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(Scientific American)   Humanity pushes yet another species to the brink of extinction: The vile, dreaded guinea worm   (scientificamerican.com) divider line 101
    More: Spiffy, parasitic diseases, South Sudan, Carter Center, Emory University  
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8770 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Jul 2012 at 7:21 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-15 06:58:49 PM
Good. Those things creep me out, two to three feet long in your leg by the time it's ready to come out and play.

And such a simple solution, filter the water and splash a little larvicide around. Good all around.
 
2012-07-15 07:27:08 PM
www.foxnews.com

Nope.

NopeNopeNope
NopeNopeNope
 
2012-07-15 07:28:11 PM
I first read that as "Hannity pushes yet another species to the brink of extinction:"
 
2012-07-15 07:29:04 PM
Why can't we push all the helminths to extinction? They are one of the nastiest things about living on this planet.
 
2012-07-15 07:30:37 PM

Fiberglassgem: Why can't we push all the helminths to extinction? They are one of the nastiest things about living on this planet.


I think the platyhelminthes are quite amusing.
 
2012-07-15 07:31:13 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
Fun fact(-ish): The symbol of the Rod of Asclepius mostly likely originates from ancient physicians winding a Guinea worm around a stick as they pulled it from the body.
 
2012-07-15 07:32:36 PM
Kids need to get an immunity naturally.
 
2012-07-15 07:35:08 PM

the_chief: Kids need to get an immunity naturally.


That's why responsible parents throw guinea worm parties.
 
2012-07-15 07:35:45 PM
Prayer is the answer!
 
2012-07-15 07:35:56 PM

FunkOut: Fiberglassgem: Why can't we push all the helminths to extinction? They are one of the nastiest things about living on this planet.

I think the platyhelminthes are quite amusing.


That is the exception, a fluke, if you will.
 
2012-07-15 07:35:59 PM
MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
 
2012-07-15 07:37:11 PM
images4.wikia.nocookie.net

Come at me bro
 
2012-07-15 07:42:45 PM
A what worm?

animal.discovery.com
 
2012-07-15 07:42:47 PM
If only guinea worms had a wormed space exploration program, they could escape extinction.
 
2012-07-15 07:43:58 PM
I remember these things from my biology course, in the late sixties.
In the last couple of years, I've finally started getting a full night's sleep.
Thanks for reminding me, Fark.
Now, please don't mention the Loa Loa.
 
2012-07-15 07:44:26 PM

zato_ichi: [www.foxnews.com image 320x240]

Nope.

NopeNopeNope
NopeNopeNope


kinda lends support to the "out of Africa" theory regarding early human migration, IMHO. If I lived near those things, I'd pick up my meager possessions and start walking north, ASAP
 
2012-07-15 07:44:39 PM
Is it really good to completely extinguish this? I mean, yes, suffering is ended, but how does this affect the larger ecosystem?

Just asking, overall I think this is a good thing.
 
2012-07-15 07:45:14 PM
You pretty much suck as a species if humans in this day and age are trying to kill every last one of you, and not even Greenpeace is complaining about it.
 
2012-07-15 07:46:13 PM
I misread the headline as "Hannity pushes yet another species to the brink of extinction: The vile, dreaded guinea worm". Strangely, the article still seemed oddly germane.
 
2012-07-15 07:46:16 PM
While I'm happy that our hamster friends don't have to worry about diseases, couldn't they focus on something a little more pressing?

/I read the article
//I just choose to ignore it
 
2012-07-15 07:46:46 PM

uncleacid: A what worm?

[animal.discovery.com image 540x380]


weep weep!
 
2012-07-15 07:48:38 PM

Tillmaster: I remember these things from my biology course, in the late sixties.
In the last couple of years, I've finally started getting a full night's sleep.
Thanks for reminding me, Fark.
Now, please don't mention the Loa Loa.


Sweet dreams.

t1.gstatic.com
 
2012-07-15 07:50:42 PM

iaazathot: Is it really good to completely extinguish this? I mean, yes, suffering is ended, but how does this affect the larger ecosystem?

Just asking, overall I think this is a good thing.


The headline sounded sarcastic, so I was going to say something like this, but then I found out what a guinea worm is, and I know what my nightmares are going to be about for the next few weeks.
 
2012-07-15 07:51:20 PM
Groovy
 
2012-07-15 07:53:41 PM
Personal aside: Jimmy Carter was making a presentation at Emory University Medical School about Guinea Worm disease, around 19 or 20 years ago. Showed lots of slides featuring these nasty creatures. My office was in charge of the luncheon for dignitaries that followed. To our horror, we discovered as we entered the dining hall, that the fancy Asian salad we had ordered was on display at each place setting, featuring long, white, dangling noodles that looked EXACTLY like...you guessed it. Ugh!!
 
2012-07-15 07:54:24 PM
I was worried for a second that this was an anti-Italian article.
 
2012-07-15 07:57:49 PM

iaazathot: Is it really good to completely extinguish this? I mean, yes, suffering is ended, but how does this affect the larger ecosystem?

Just asking, overall I think this is a good thing.


I think this is a good question. I don't have any deep knowledge or insight into these worms, or other parasites, but you might not realize they have some value until they're gone. Who knows what other disease or ecological problems they're keeping in check? Would eliminating the worm increase autoimmune diseases in some areas?

I imagine whatever the pluses and negatives, eliminating these worms would probably be a net positive. At the same time though, playing with ecology like that reminds me of the Supreme Court case Devil You Know v. Devil You Don't. I guess that's easy for me to say when I don't have parasites crawling through me, though.
 
2012-07-15 08:00:36 PM

Kuoxasar: iaazathot: Is it really good to completely extinguish this? I mean, yes, suffering is ended, but how does this affect the larger ecosystem?

Just asking, overall I think this is a good thing.

I think this is a good question. I don't have any deep knowledge or insight into these worms, or other parasites, but you might not realize they have some value until they're gone. Who knows what other disease or ecological problems they're keeping in check? Would eliminating the worm increase autoimmune diseases in some areas?

I imagine whatever the pluses and negatives, eliminating these worms would probably be a net positive. At the same time though, playing with ecology like that reminds me of the Supreme Court case Devil You Know v. Devil You Don't. I guess that's easy for me to say when I don't have parasites crawling through me, though.


Oh, we have parasites. Most of them collect welfare and WIC.
 
2012-07-15 08:01:05 PM

iaazathot: Is it really good to completely extinguish this? I mean, yes, suffering is ended, but how does this affect the larger ecosystem?

Just asking, overall I think this is a good thing.


These things apparently only infect humans, and in terms of biomass I don't think they ever amounted to much, so it's not like they were an important foodsource for anything. The effect on the ecosystem should be negligible.
 
2012-07-15 08:02:37 PM

iaazathot: Is it really good to completely extinguish this? I mean, yes, suffering is ended, but how does this affect the larger ecosystem?

Just asking, overall I think this is a good thing.


I know people who actually think this way. No vermin and no viral plague is beyond consideration for rescue. My ALF auntie is one of them too. I weep for humanity.

/Glad I'm old.
 
2012-07-15 08:05:20 PM
I worked in West Africa in 2003 with the Peace Corps and World Vision on a program to educate villagers about avoiding Guinea Worm. There were three people at one of the small meetings (of about 25 people total) who were at various stages, and they were just joking around about it like it was no big deal. Some had the attitude that using the nylon filters was just too much trouble. Glad to see it has changed.
 
2012-07-15 08:05:33 PM
Wait, are these the worm parasites that make you smart enough to impress Leela?
 
2012-07-15 08:06:17 PM

Matthew Keene: Tillmaster: I remember these things from my biology course, in the late sixties.
In the last couple of years, I've finally started getting a full night's sleep.
Thanks for reminding me, Fark.
Now, please don't mention the Loa Loa.

Sweet dreams.

[t1.gstatic.com image 267x189]


www.cazurro.com
 
2012-07-15 08:06:24 PM
The comments of TFA are hilarious.

Arguments over "nematode roundworm' as a redundancy, earthworms are annelids.

Arguments over the origin of the caduceus.

All in an effort to avoid being creeped out.
 
2012-07-15 08:13:56 PM
"Oh Claire, would you ever consider dating a guy who looked like this?"
"Can't you just leave me alone?"
"I mean even if he had a nice personality and a cool car... although you'd probably have to ride in the backseat because his nuts would ride shotgun."


In all seriousness, the idea that exterminating a parasite species wouldn't possibly have some kind of unforeseen and unpleasant downstream effects seems a little naive. I say this as a biologist... but of course I also say this as a guy living in a country with a safe water supply.
 
2012-07-15 08:16:55 PM

Matthew Keene: Oh, we have parasites. Most of them collect welfare and WIC.


You poor dear.
 
2012-07-15 08:19:46 PM

buzzcut73: You pretty much suck as a species if humans in this day and age are trying to kill every last one of you, and not even Greenpeace is complaining about it.


But has PETA heard about this yet? I look forward to their reaction.

/PETA: People Eradicating Terrible Animals?
 
2012-07-15 08:40:04 PM
ITALIAN AMERICAN worms.
 
2012-07-15 08:45:03 PM

No Such Agency:
In all seriousness, the idea that exterminating a parasite species wouldn't possibly have some kind of unforeseen and unpleasant downstream effects seems a little naive. I say this as a biologist... but of course I also say this as a guy living in a country with a safe water supply.


I agree with this as a layman, I'm not comfortable seeing something die out completely.
I assume there will be some strains will be kept secure somewhere like smallpox
 
2012-07-15 08:50:55 PM
I say this as someone deeply concerned about the holistic effects on the environment:

Good, and I hope they all burn in Hell.
 
2012-07-15 08:55:51 PM
Go Science. Go Jimmy Carter. Yay Human Race.
 
2012-07-15 08:57:01 PM

iaazathot: Is it really good to completely extinguish this? I mean, yes, suffering is ended, but how does this affect the larger ecosystem?

Just asking, overall I think this is a good thing.


I highly doubt it would be completely extinct. Even smallpox still exists in laboratories, just not in the wild.

Someone will undoubtably keep guinea worms as lab critters for centuries to come.
 
2012-07-15 09:03:03 PM

Matthew Keene: Tillmaster: I remember these things from my biology course, in the late sixties.
In the last couple of years, I've finally started getting a full night's sleep.
Thanks for reminding me, Fark.
Now, please don't mention the Loa Loa.

Sweet dreams.

[t1.gstatic.com image 267x189]


Thanks, jerk!

/had an itchy eye the other day and started to wonder if this was the cause
 
2012-07-15 09:04:31 PM
Are guinea worms just like regular worms only they wear wife-beater t-shirts, talk with their hands, and wear lots of gold jewelry?
 
2012-07-15 09:08:43 PM

No Such Agency: In all seriousness, the idea that exterminating a parasite species wouldn't possibly have some kind of unforeseen and unpleasant downstream effects seems a little naive. I say this as a biologist... but of course I also say this as a guy living in a country with a safe water supply./i>


Being that you are a biologist, would you please lsit for us the many awful consequences of the elimination of this particualr species? I really do hope tha you will provide a long list for us to read and ponder.
img9.imageshack.us
If that stumps you, how about an easier list. Take on fleas and ticks. And on an even smaller scale, what negative consequeces would result from the total eradication of the bubonic plague, and HIV?

You're the bioligist. We are the uneducated slobs waiting for your expounded wisdom. We need your insights here.
 
2012-07-15 09:12:17 PM
Why destroy a wholly containable species if it could somehow be beneficial to us in the future?
 
2012-07-15 09:18:25 PM
To all those joking about whether PETA has heard about this:

Save The Guinea Worm Foundation

Poe's Law. I just... can't tell.
 
2012-07-15 09:19:27 PM
Jesus, some of these posters are ignorant. It's a human parasite that has no intermediate hosts. Just because some benefit might be found for the parasite doesn't mean that it should be allowed to continue in the wild. I'm sure there are more than enough specimens in laboratories around the world to have any of its genetic markers replicated and spliced into e.coli or lab rats. The eggs or larva are also in a deep freeze so it could be bred if it was ever required.

/Kill it with fire
 
2012-07-15 09:20:00 PM
i26.photobucket.com
 
2012-07-15 09:20:54 PM

iaazathot: Is it really good to completely extinguish this? I mean, yes, suffering is ended, but how does this affect the larger ecosystem?

Just asking, overall I think this is a good thing.


upload.wikimedia.org

Well, it seems to only interact with human beings and a microscopic crustecean. So as long as the copepod doesn't starve from lack of food supply the side effects should be fairly limited.

And seeing the pictures I'd say .... fark the copepods interests; let 'em find something else to chew on.
 
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