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(CNN)   Oregon rules that restaurant workers do not have to wear gloves, thinks that the whole hand washing thing may just be a moneymaking racket foisted upon people by the soap industry   (eatocracy.cnn.com) divider line 133
    More: Interesting, FDA Retail Food Code, Foodborne Illness Prevention Program  
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6998 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Jul 2012 at 8:02 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-15 02:38:40 PM

JeffreyScott: /germ freak
/washes hands at least 10 times during the course of preparing my own meals at home.


you have an immune system (hopefully)

I'm only a germophobe when it comes to certain things. I guarantee you all the dishes and silverware in my kitchen are cleaned extremely well, but I'll happily prepare food without washing my hands if they don't feel dirty.

I figure they're my germs - I usually don't cook food for others.
 
2012-07-15 03:00:51 PM
The thing in the article that irritated me was the statement that plastic bags are banned in Oregon. I guess I just broke the law when I bagged up 10 bags of groceries in plastic bags at the Winco just now.
 
2012-07-15 03:17:48 PM
Headline that was greenlit was not even farking close to the actual article.

/HGNCTFA
 
2012-07-15 03:19:53 PM

windowseat: I'm so strict that there's even a piece of hygiene theatre every employee must perform. The restrooms are located in a hallway down from the bar, off the dining room. When an employee leaves the restroom they must do so with a paper towel in their hands continually making a drying motion until they reach the trash bin at the bar service window.


I always did this in my restaurant days. The way I see it, it's a small gesture to assure guests that I'm looking out for them. It requires no effort on my part (dude, I'm walking with a paper towel) and makes the restaurant look better. People notice little sh*t like that.

During my stint in management (why anyone would choose a crappy salary over $200 cash tips per night is beyond me), I often looked the other way regarding hangovers, one-hitters on smoke breaks, etc. All of my guys were hustlers and they got the sh*t done, so I wasn't big on riding someone's ass for drinking a 40oz on the way in. But there was one thing guaranteed to get you on my sh*tlist: Not washing your hands in the restroom (or other glaring sanitary issues).
One night I'm making the sort of typical small-talk guys make in the bathroom and the employee just waltzed out as I was washing up. This is why I hate bathroom door handles, btw. Anyway, I hunted him down and screamed at him in front of the entire kitchen and all the service staff who were in there at the time. "NO ONE TOUCH ANYTHING THIS ASSHOLE HAS TOUCHED." Shamed the hell out him, but that guy started washing his hands like every ten minutes.

Don't be a dick. Wash your farking hands.
 
2012-07-15 03:52:03 PM
I run a banquet/catering kitchen and we use gloves on anything raw that stays raw - veg, fruit, bread, apps, salads, etc - but we change them for each thing we do. We don't keep the same gloves on for multiple items (fruit, then veg, etc) or hours at a time. We still hand wash and hand sanitize regularly, so the gloves are probably moot... Just a good way to get an overall good hygiene practice ingrained in the employees, whether they stay or move on.

Otherwise, we only really use gloves to keep us clean when handling messy things - traying up raw meats, sauced items, etc - so that we don't waste time washing every five minutes, and have less contamination on our bodies to clean off.

We burn through a 100ct box of gloves in a night, with only myself and 2 other preps in the kitchen. If you've got the same gloves on as when you showed up 4 hours ago, that's when you are causing many more problems than protecting against.
 
2012-07-15 04:04:06 PM
So the Rajneeshees were innocent?
 
2012-07-15 04:19:42 PM
It's all fine and dandy until

www.gunandgame.com
 
2012-07-15 04:32:42 PM

windowseat:

As it happens I own a restaurant where it's a potential firing offense to not wash your hands thoroughly or change your gloves in between tasks. My staff has HACCP drummed into them day one. This means temps are checked on the line every hour, everything is day dotted and the coolers and walkin are arranged properly. Everything is done by the book and people who skate on the rules don't last long. Neither do their direct supervisors if it becomes a regular occurrence.

I'm so strict that there's even a piece of hygiene theatre every employee must perform. The restrooms are located in a hallway down from the bar, off the dining room. When an employee leaves the restroom they must do so with a paper towel in their hands continually making a drying motion until they reach the trash bin at the bar service window.

Anyone who objects to this doesn't understand my business and again, doesn't last long.


I'll eat at your restaurant any day. The hygiene thing is theater, but also mandatory. Perception IS reality.
CSB:

Guy I worked with many years ago summarized it this way: Imagine if a brain surgeon performed one surgery a day for a year (we know this isn't realistic, but stay with me for a minute). In that case he has the opportunity to kill 365 people a year. We, as line cooks, have the opportunity to kill that many people in an afternoon. If you don't think this job is serious then collect your check and move on. We don't need you.

/CSB

Welcome to TF.
 
2012-07-15 04:36:08 PM

dickfreckle: windowseat: I'm so strict that there's even a piece of hygiene theatre every employee must perform. The restrooms are located in a hallway down from the bar, off the dining room. When an employee leaves the restroom they must do so with a paper towel in their hands continually making a drying motion until they reach the trash bin at the bar service window.

I always did this in my restaurant days. The way I see it, it's a small gesture to assure guests that I'm looking out for them. It requires no effort on my part (dude, I'm walking with a paper towel) and makes the restaurant look better. People notice little sh*t like that.

During my stint in management (why anyone would choose a crappy salary over $200 cash tips per night is beyond me), I often looked the other way regarding hangovers, one-hitters on smoke breaks, etc. All of my guys were hustlers and they got the sh*t done, so I wasn't big on riding someone's ass for drinking a 40oz on the way in. But there was one thing guaranteed to get you on my sh*tlist: Not washing your hands in the restroom (or other glaring sanitary issues).
One night I'm making the sort of typical small-talk guys make in the bathroom and the employee just waltzed out as I was washing up. This is why I hate bathroom door handles, btw. Anyway, I hunted him down and screamed at him in front of the entire kitchen and all the service staff who were in there at the time. "NO ONE TOUCH ANYTHING THIS ASSHOLE HAS TOUCHED." Shamed the hell out him, but that guy started washing his hands like every ten minutes.

Don't be a dick. Wash your farking hands.


Wow. So it was ok to show up drunk or get wasted on a break in your restaurant but God help them if they didn't wash their hands after using the restroom. How about if they didn't wash their hands after taking a "one hitter" while on break? And I love how you called the offending employee an "ASSHOLE" in a really loud voice in front of everyone to show what a tough guy you were. Something tells me your "hustlers" did pretty much whatever they wanted and you went along because you were too much of a wuss to say anything different.
 
2012-07-15 05:05:46 PM
MrHelpful:

MrHelpful, you're not helping. Seriously, go to bed. It is WAY past your bedtime.
 
2012-07-15 05:20:21 PM
Didn't read the thread yet, but just wanted to say that as a former food safety manager, I'm in favour of this, except in certain high-risk cases, such as making food for those with compromised immune systems. Conscientious handwashing, together with a comprehensive food safety programme, should be sufficient in most cases. And yes, I agree that gloves can actually make the problem worse, for all the reasons given -- including that gloves themselves can be contaminated, and help to transport contamination around a kitchen. And I'm also bothered by the added waste involved.
 
2012-07-15 05:29:51 PM
further proof that Oregonians are filth
 
2012-07-15 06:00:54 PM

windowseat: indarwinsshadow: Interesting. I blearily write this after spending the entire night awake with my 10 year old son, who has been projectile vomiting since 12:30 a.m. My guess is Staphylococcus aureus food poisoning from some idiot who didn't wash their hands properly and handled our food at the Wendys restaurant last night. So, here's a big middle finger to the morons on the court who don't believe people need to wear gloves to handle food.

I'm really sorry the boy is sick and I hope he makes a fast recovery. Alas, the person who handled your food was probably wearing gloves and they never bothered to change them. Gloves are no good if they're not changed as the worker encounters different food items and equipment.

I've been in the business for over thirty years and gloves have their place in the kitchen, but not at the final assembly of your order and especially not by staff that multitask between the line and registers.


Ontario does not require gloves for food handling. But it's unlikely this illness came from Wendy's. Companies like Wendy's pretty much know what they're doing, and have systems in place that even their dumbest employees would have trouble screwing up. They didn't get to be a huge North American restaurant company by being morans about food safety.

Only a doctor can tell you what the illness and agent really are. A food safety expert can give you a good guess, based on supplied details such as time of onset, symptoms, and so on. But realistically, a kid can get a foodborne illness from almost anything. And in most cases, it's actually okay: exposure to pathogens is part of how we build up our immune systems, so if you get sick as a kid you're less likely to get sick as an adult, when it may matter more.

If you think you got sick from a restaurant, call them as soon as possible about it and speak directly to whoever's in charge (not any underlings, no matter how much they insist -- in fact, don't say anything to them at all about why you're calling). They'll want to know, so they can look into it. But I'll tell you right now, despite stereotypes, most foodborne illness doesn't come from fast food joints. The kind of foods they prepare are carefully selected for minimum risk. For example, uncooked chicken and pork -- two major sources of illness in 'nice' restaurants -- are all but unknown in the QSR industry. And you can forget about fresh shellfish, an even more insidious culprit.)
 
2012-07-15 06:08:57 PM
Everyone knows that human skin has bacteria on it and disposable glove don't right? Ok carry on. ;P

It is quite funny though. "Well making people wear gloves didn't work because they became less cautious. So instead of educating/enforcing proper hygiene we'll just tell them they don't have to wear gloves. Sounds good to me. Cheap, simple policy."
 
2012-07-15 06:12:41 PM

Gunderson: Any good NY Pizzeria would scoff at the notion of wearing gloves while tossing a pie.


Pizza is a special case. A pizza oven is around 500F. Anything that goes in and comes back out in five minutes is free of foodborne contamination, I don't care if it's fresh dogshiat. It might not be good to eat, but it won't include any active microorganisms. Even jurisdictions with strict glove rules don't require pizza cooks to use them before the pie goes in the oven -- and most will let you serve a 'hot' slice afterwards, on the same theory: If it was 500F awhile ago, and never went below 145F since, it's good to eat no matter who touched it. There are very few agents of concern that can survive those temperatures
 
2012-07-15 06:19:54 PM

spacelord321: Had a glass chillum in my fifth pocket while working at a subway styled place.


I didn't know what a glass chillum was so I did a GIS. I get that they're a version of a one-hitter but they all looked surprisingly phallic to me, like a much smaller version of a pyrex-glass dildo (which looks cool but is not really fun to use). Interesting.
 
2012-07-15 06:36:41 PM

ExperianScaresCthulhu: McManus_brothers: spacelord321: Real cooks don't wear gloves. That is all.

JohnnyC: Good cooks/chefs know to keep their hands clean.

Properly trained chefs are one thing, and I have no problem with them not wearing gloves. However, the 19 year old line cook who just came back in from the alley after smoking a joint, yeah that's an issue.

The men -- and women! -- of New Mexico who believe washing their hands after taking a piss, taking a crap, changing a tampon, sneezing, or wiping their nose.... they're also an issue.

Yeah, it's dumb to see folks handle cash and food with the same gloves; but I had to report one place because one of the women was using her bare hands to personally pick over some fries before handing them off at the drive through. I guess she thought that the customers were receiving too much, or maybe she liked uniformity of presentation. Who knows.

This entire state was raised by wolves.*

/* no offense meant to wolves


From everything I've read about it, money appears to be a poor transmission vehicle for agents of all kinds, but even where it does appear to contain them (along with BPA, cocaine, etc.), it seems to also trap and kill them. This depends a lot on the composition. Polymer currency has a smooth surface and doesn't seem to catch much of anything. Fabric currency (like ours) catches a lot more (on average, about four times as much), but commonly 'traps' it in the fibres, and also kills it by drying it out. (Just like us, these microbes cannot survive without water.) Further, the number of bacteria is less relevant than the *kind* of bacteria, and the few studies done on this have found mostly harmless bacteria. Put it all together, and money just doesn't seem to be the dirty, horrible communicator of disease that a lot of people think it is. These are still good ideas -- every little thing can help -- but it seem unnecessary to be fearful about it.

One bit of nonscientific evidence is purely empirical: given how common the practice is, if it really was a serious health risk, you'd expect to see a lot more people getting sick from it.
 
2012-07-15 06:49:33 PM

Submitted First With a Better Headline: (seriously, if your hands are remotely wet, those things are a biatch to get on)


This is why I was forced to switch to poly gloves, which are crappy for, well, everything, but much easier to get on an off if your hands are wet.
 
2012-07-15 06:50:14 PM
Aren't most food poisoning cases caused by under-cooking food? (other than the salmonella spinach, eggs etc.) Other than ordering a hamburger not well done, as long as the meat was cooked to proper temp to kill any microbes, it doesn't matter if the prep guy washed his hands after wiping or not.
 
2012-07-15 06:58:40 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Submitted First With a Better Headline: (seriously, if your hands are remotely wet, those things are a biatch to get on)

This is why I was forced to switch to poly gloves, which are crappy for, well, everything, but much easier to get on an off if your hands are wet.


I'm a lab tech and when I have to do phlebotomy it is a real pain. You have to switch out gloves every patient so like every 3-5 minutes you're putting new gloves on. Meanwhile your hands are a little sweaty from wearing gloves constantly and it takes like a minute to put them on while the patient is getting impatient. lol

The wearing gloves thing for drawing blood is basically a perception for the patient. They think if you don't have new gloves on that you are contaminating them. No, they're actually for my protection. The site is swabbed with alcohol and the needle is sterile the gloves have nothing to do with it. I'm sure if someone campaigned to educate the public we could save that time putting new gloves on every patient and make the bigwigs look better/more money.
 
2012-07-15 07:05:46 PM

dickfreckle: windowseat: I'm so strict that there's even a piece of hygiene theatre every employee must perform. The restrooms are located in a hallway down from the bar, off the dining room. When an employee leaves the restroom they must do so with a paper towel in their hands continually making a drying motion until they reach the trash bin at the bar service window.

I always did this in my restaurant days. The way I see it, it's a small gesture to assure guests that I'm looking out for them. It requires no effort on my part (dude, I'm walking with a paper towel) and makes the restaurant look better. People notice little sh*t like that.

During my stint in management (why anyone would choose a crappy salary over $200 cash tips per night is beyond me), I often looked the other way regarding hangovers, one-hitters on smoke breaks, etc. All of my guys were hustlers and they got the sh*t done, so I wasn't big on riding someone's ass for drinking a 40oz on the way in. But there was one thing guaranteed to get you on my sh*tlist: Not washing your hands in the restroom (or other glaring sanitary issues).
One night I'm making the sort of typical small-talk guys make in the bathroom and the employee just waltzed out as I was washing up. This is why I hate bathroom door handles, btw. Anyway, I hunted him down and screamed at him in front of the entire kitchen and all the service staff who were in there at the time. "NO ONE TOUCH ANYTHING THIS ASSHOLE HAS TOUCHED." Shamed the hell out him, but that guy started washing his hands like every ten minutes.

Don't be a dick. Wash your farking hands.


Yep the paper towel gesture is definately noticed. A must if customers can see you enter the restroom.
 
2012-07-15 07:47:26 PM

JeffreyScott: /germ freak


You could have saved yourself a lot of trouble by just writing that.

I don't mean to denigrate you, but:
1) If this is a pathology that you understand is likely irrational, seek help.
2) If you think it's perfectly sensible, get educated:

Germs are a part of life. And there is no such thing as perfect cleanliness. In fact, perfect cleanliness, if it was even attainable, would be fatal.

First, bear in mind what 'foreign' bodies really are and are not. A 'foreign' body is one that is not a product of your own genome. Yet our human genome contains an enormous amount of data that is likely of foreign origin. And all complex lifeforms (eukaryotes) derive from the incidence of one body inhabiting another. The mitochondria inside our cells, that produce the ATP providing all our body's energy, originated as foreign bodies; they are an extremely ancient symbiotic parasite of sorts, without which we would die. Less obviously symbiotic are our gut flora -- fully independent microorganisms that inhabit our GI tract, and deliver beneficial effects for us, such as helping us digest food and fighting off bad germs. There's good reason to believe we need these to survive also, or at least are much less healthy without them.

Our human bodies are covered and filled with foreign bodies, at a ratio of nearly ten to one of them to every one of our cells. Though, our cells are much larger, by a huge ratio, so the end product is that a typical healthy adult is carrying around about three or four pounds of foreign biomatter at a time. But don't let that trouble you: these are 'good' germs, not bad ones. And one of their important jobs is fighting off bad ones. Since it's impossible for us to be fully free of germs, that's very valuable.

Second, understand that most of the germs in the world won't hurt you. They're there, yes, but only some of them pose any real threat to us. You really don't need to worry about most of it most of the time, and in fact, a little can be good for you, in keeping your immune system informed about what's in your daily environment. Constant washing deprives your body of an important stream of information about your bioenvironment that may prove important later.

Third, constant washing, over the long run, has the opposite effect from the one you intend. Bugs are much simpler than we are, so they evolve much faster. Undo sanitation accelerates their evolution, and we can't actually just invent new antibiotics, but instead have to hope to discover new ones, and hope that the ones we already have remain effective. Severe sanitation results in 'superbugs' that are much harder to mitigate than their less hardy forebears. What I'm trying to tell you is that your constant handwashing and obsession with cleanliness will help introduce a series of increasingly dangerous pathogens -- ones that are less likely to emerge if we don't try to make ourselves and our world impossibly clean.
 
2012-07-15 07:58:19 PM

poughdrew: Isn't there some other silly regulation about plastic cutting boards? IIRC, it's been shown that a wooden cutting board is more safe than a gouged-with-knife-marks plastic board. But hey, regulations. Of course, these exist to prevent against the lowest common denominator, which for cutting boards would be some food truck with a PT pine slab for their cutting board, and for gloves would be for that hemophiliac line cook with open cuts on their hands.


It's weird, but yeah: plastic boards provide better transmission vectors than wooden ones. It seems that what happens is that wooden boards do 'catch' more, but they retain less when washed, and what does stick dies when the board dries. But plastic boards develop thousands of tiny little waterproof crevices that pathogens can hole up in for longer periods. At home, I just give my wooden board a quick once-over with soap and water and let it dry. Every so often I treat it with a little mineral oil, but only when it's completely dry. I have a few wooden boards, and my only other one is glass (a gift). I won't use plastic boards in my home, and when I worked in restaurants I gave them extra attention, to make sure they were as clean as I could get 'em.
 
2012-07-15 08:11:39 PM

windowseat: ExperianScaresCthulhu: windowseat: Let me break it down folks. Given a choice of two options, only two, no "none of the above" what would you rather have me put in your mouth for 30 seconds?

A) my finger after being washed in hot water and soap for as long as it takes to sing "Happy Birthday" vigorous nail-brushing included.

B) my gloved finger that may or may not be freshly gloved and in fact may have just touched a garbage can, a spoiled shrimp, the grease trap, unwashed spinach and raw hamburger.

How many restaurants have you worked in where people wash their hands long enough to go through the Happy Birthday song? LOL Yeah, the best option is A.............. but given that the usual option is not only B, but B without gloves... fk that.

See also: I don't eat at food trucks, or from salad bars/chinese bars

I get your point, but I wish it was a world with BOTH A & B.

As it happens I own a restaurant where it's a potential firing offense to not wash your hands thoroughly or change your gloves in between tasks. My staff has HACCP drummed into them day one. This means temps are checked on the line every hour, everything is day dotted and the coolers and walkin are arranged properly. Everything is done by the book and people who skate on the rules don't last long. Neither do their direct supervisors if it becomes a regular occurrence.

I'm so strict that there's even a piece of hygiene theatre every employee must perform. The restrooms are located in a hallway down from the bar, off the dining room. When an employee leaves the restroom they must do so with a paper towel in their hands continually making a drying motion until they reach the trash bin at the bar service window.

Anyone who objects to this doesn't understand my business and again, doesn't last long.


I would work for you in a heartbeat. Seriously, I had my fill of half-assery in restaurants, and I've worked with and for some seriously losers. I'd be thrilled to work for someone who actually takes this stuff seriously, and I'd be proud to work for a place that did. Almost every place I ever worked seemed to take most of it as suggestions, and even when I got to be in charge, the owner often didn't have my back, leaving me hanging. It's one of the reasons I got out of restaurants.
 
2012-07-15 08:14:30 PM

Monkey2: MrHelpful:

MrHelpful, you're not helping. Seriously, go to bed. It is WAY past your bedtime.


Really? Why do you say that?
 
2012-07-15 08:27:05 PM

Littleturtle: The thing in the article that irritated me was the statement that plastic bags are banned in Oregon. I guess I just broke the law when I bagged up 10 bags of groceries in plastic bags at the Winco just now.


This was harder to research than I thought it would be, and I can't be sure of the accuracy. According to Campaign For Recycling, two cities in Oregon have plastic bag laws:

Portland: "Portland became the first city to adopt a ban on plastic bags in July 2011, after the state legislature failed to pass a statewide ban. Effective October 15, 2011."

Corvallis: "City Council approved a plastic bag ban with five cent charge per paper bag on July 2, 2012."

I found a bunch of links about proposed state legislation last year and before, but nothing suggesting any resulting laws or current legislation. According to Zero Resource, Oregon has no current legislation moving on this.
 
2012-07-15 09:07:36 PM

Monkey2:
CSB:

Guy I worked with many years ago summarized it this way: Imagine if a brain surgeon performed one surgery a day for a year (we know this isn't realistic, but stay with me for a minute). In that case he has the opportunity to kill 365 people a year. We, as line cooks, have the opportunity to kill that many people in an afternoon. If you don't think this job is serious then collect your check and move on. We don't need you.

/CSB

Welcome to TF.


I had one customer fall Ill from a bad piece of fish about 18 years ago. My chef at the time acted like he'd killed someone. Luckily the customer was a friend and she laughed it off, but I thought the guy was going to fall on his boning knife.

Thanks for the TF!
 
2012-07-15 09:17:04 PM
Do you wear gloves when you cook at home? Hell, half the time I don't even bother washing my hands.

//Hardly ever get sick.
 
2012-07-15 11:24:36 PM
It isn't rocket science - if you're not wearing gloves, you should only be working with food that will be thoroughly cooked afterwards, and wash your hands in between tasks and taking care not to gets bits everywhere. If you're wearing gloves, change them in between tasks. Take special care to wash after using the restroom, handing raw foods, going outside for a smoke, taking out garbage, etc.

While I hadn't seen the research on gloves being heavily contaminated, I wouldn't be surprised. There's always comments about how many pairs of gloves I go through in a gloved environment.
 
2012-07-16 07:52:41 AM
Just an FYI to everyone, if you have eaten out at a restaurant ever, you have had food prepared without gloves.

In every kitchen I have ever worked in (from Applebee's to classy-ish restaurants) no cook/chef wore gloves unless the health inspectors were on their farking way to the restaurant. Gloves are a pain in the ass, cost a lot in resources and a well trained line cook/chef knows how to keep their hands clean.
 
2012-07-16 09:55:45 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: JeffreyScott: /germ freak

You could have saved yourself a lot of trouble by just writing that.

I don't mean to denigrate you, but:
1) If this is a pathology that you understand is likely irrational, seek help.
2) If you think it's perfectly sensible, get educated:

Germs are a part of life. And there is no such thing as perfect cleanliness. In fact, perfect cleanliness, if it was even attainable, would be fatal.

First, bear in mind what 'foreign' bodies really are and are not. A 'foreign' body is one that is not a product of your own genome. Yet our human genome contains an enormous amount of data that is likely of foreign origin. And all complex lifeforms (eukaryotes) derive from the incidence of one body inhabiting another. The mitochondria inside our cells, that produce the ATP providing all our body's energy, originated as foreign bodies; they are an extremely ancient symbiotic parasite of sorts, without which we would die. Less obviously symbiotic are our gut flora -- fully independent microorganisms that inhabit our GI tract, and deliver beneficial effects for us, such as helping us digest food and fighting off bad germs. There's good reason to believe we need these to survive also, or at least are much less healthy without them.

Our human bodies are covered and filled with foreign bodies, at a ratio of nearly ten to one of them to every one of our cells. Though, our cells are much larger, by a huge ratio, so the end product is that a typical healthy adult is carrying around about three or four pounds of foreign biomatter at a time. But don't let that trouble you: these are 'good' germs, not bad ones. And one of their important jobs is fighting off bad ones. Since it's impossible for us to be fully free of germs, that's very valuable.

Second, understand that most of the germs in the world won't hurt you. They're there, yes, but only some of them pose any real threat to us. You really don't need to worry about most of it most of the time, and in fact, a li ...


Small issue;
Washing, is not a disinfecting procedure, but a cleansing one to reduce bactrial counts and organic debris. It does not affect/induce resistance inless you foolishly routinely use antiseptic soap.
 
2012-07-16 11:27:02 AM

spacelord321: Real cooks don't wear gloves. That is all.


Came for this. From my experience, kitchen staffers who wear gloves can develop a false sense of security and don't swap them out often enough. At the restaurants I worked at in Oregon, gloves were always optional. I never used them, except if I had a cut on my hand. Bare, clean hands is best. Besides, when you get food goop on your hands, you're much more likely to wash more frequently...or at least dip your hands in the bleach bucket.
 
2012-07-16 12:06:54 PM
No GROSS tag on Fark?
 
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