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(e! Science News)   Caltech and JPL create new amplifier that will boost electrical signals for space exploration, blow the trunk completely off a '64 Impala   ( ) divider line 21
    More: Interesting, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, electrical signals, amplifiers, radio signals, space exploration, Nature Physics, machines  
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1635 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Jul 2012 at 3:57 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»

21 Comments   (+0 »)
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Archived thread
2012-07-14 09:36:31 AM
Likes the sound of this
2012-07-14 04:23:08 PM  
.jpg I be rollin, they be ____.

2012-07-14 04:57:02 PM  
Does it go to 11?
2012-07-14 05:24:20 PM
NOW we'll find them!
2012-07-14 05:39:07 PM  
"Back to the Future" ultimate amp.gif

/assuming there is one out there

//or in here
2012-07-14 06:42:03 PM

These guys have dibs...
2012-07-14 08:24:32 PM  
These are actually highly sensitive, so sensitive they can listen to the universe and hear there is no god.

These are so tuneable we might finally find the quantum radio channels that span the galaxy and reveal the existence of an advanced galatic civilization. At least highly civilized until you hear what they have for morning drive time radio.

Unfortunately these are built from superconductors, so you won't have access to them in handheld devices any time soon. It would be a neat way to get more out of radio spectrum. Imagine being able to transmit and receive 100 channels in a single MHz tick.
2012-07-14 08:51:00 PM  
"...blow the trunk completely off a '64 Impala"

Sounds like a chick I used to date.
2012-07-14 09:37:56 PM  

SmackLT: [ image 400x300]
Likes the sound of this

That's a 63. Miss mine.
2012-07-14 10:35:21 PM  
Speaking as an RF engineer with a passing familiarity with this sort of thing, I was stunned to click on the link and, for the first time in many years, read an actually well-written piece which was both highly accurate and accessible to laypersons.

See that it doesn't happen again.
2012-07-14 10:51:33 PM  
Is very interested.
2012-07-14 10:52:35 PM  
JPL or JBL? We are talking amplifiers here, right?
2012-07-14 11:06:50 PM
2012-07-14 11:27:25 PM  
Ah, subby... Thanks for the laugh. I, too, have witnessed the "Dancefloor Impalifornia" known as the Impala trunk. This was with totally like, totally pimped-out 12v strip lights, UV incandescents, SERIOUS 6x9s...

and in the '80s

Awesome. Totally.
2012-07-14 11:39:59 PM  

AbiNormal: Is very interested.
[ image 500x281]

Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for saving me the work.
2012-07-15 12:31:19 AM  
Parametric amplifiers are one of the most clever circuits I've encountered. I like reading about the early 1960s amplifiers used to track the early probes. Great fun. Lots of physics, no software retards to make everything toxically complex.
2012-07-15 02:42:04 AM  
The team built the instrument to boost microwave signals...

All that just to heat their Hot Pockets a little faster?

Jeez, those are some impatient researchers.
2012-07-15 04:39:48 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: no software retards to make everything toxically complex.

2012-07-15 04:43:34 AM
2012-07-15 10:17:43 PM  

browser_snake: JPL or JBL? We are talking amplifiers here, right?

I read it JBL at first. I was thinking JBL is making space amps now? I had to read it twice.
2012-07-16 07:17:25 AM  
I'm just wondering if I can build one for 20 meters.
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