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(The Verge)   This might not be as powerful as the LM-1 documentary, but it will $3500 cheaper and in 32 years a lot more popular   (theverge.com) divider line 11
    More: Sick, Nintendo 3DS, New Order, Afrika Bambaataa  
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3702 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Jul 2012 at 9:19 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



11 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-07-14 09:20:46 AM  
The "be" verb, how does it work?
 
2012-07-14 09:47:58 AM  
Somebody translate that headline, please? Subby fails to drive english good.
 
2012-07-14 10:19:35 AM  
I'd look forward to the film, there was a good doc on Bob Moog, and Synth Britannia on synth bands of the late '70s and early '80s in post-punk England. And say what you will subs, but in hip hop I'm sure cost was a factor, and the 808 really did power music forward for a decade. If affordable drum machines hadn't been available in the '80s, would rap music have gotten as many artists coming out with as many great (and many terrible) tracks?

The correct way to do platform evangelism beyond the grave is demonstrated by the Atari ST user: "It's one THIRD the price and the same specs, plus it's in color, and we have MIDI. We can run Mac OS too! Guys? Guys?"
 
2012-07-14 10:56:51 AM  
Will this film explain why the 808 kick drum makes the girlies get dumb?
 
2012-07-14 11:24:07 AM  
Unfortunately, the entire 2 hour documentary is made up of 10 minutes worth of video "sampled" and repeated throughout. repeated throughout. repeated throughout.
 
2012-07-14 01:46:07 PM  
Equally as pleasant as watching a documentary about Auschwitz, I'm sure.
 
2012-07-14 02:25:21 PM  
+++ Subby! Nicely played!

(to others, the Roland TR-808 is a drum machine, and the Linn LM-1 is a drum machine that, at the time, was the most realistic sounding drum machine on the market... about 32 years ago).

/synth geek
 
2012-07-14 02:39:26 PM  
I wonder how long until this documentary will be emulated flawlessly on my android tablet.
 
2012-07-14 03:02:03 PM  

xrayspx: I'd look forward to the film, there was a good doc on Bob Moog, and Synth Britannia on synth bands of the late '70s and early '80s in post-punk England. And say what you will subs, but in hip hop I'm sure cost was a factor, and the 808 really did power music forward for a decade. If affordable drum machines hadn't been available in the '80s, would rap music have gotten as many artists coming out with as many great (and many terrible) tracks?

The correct way to do platform evangelism beyond the grave is demonstrated by the Atari ST user: "It's one THIRD the price and the same specs, plus it's in color, and we have MIDI. We can run Mac OS too! Guys? Guys?"


I still used my Atari ST for the bulk of my MIDI processing until about 2 years ago when I finally and reluctantly retired the machine. Without the serial MIDI expansion port for Master Tracks Pro the ST, limited to only 16 midi channels, just didn't provide enough channels to run all my synths. My Korg Microstation, Kawai K5-m, Yamaha TG-100, and Casio LD-80 could each eat up a full 16 channels by themselves.

I remember when I bought my first drum machine. It was a Yamaha RX-21. The had a LinnDrum for $100 more at the time and I was sorely tempted to buy it, but the lack of MIDI made me go for the RX-21. I regretted it for some time until I got my Ensoniq Mirage and could build my own drum samples with it. The RX-21 had a horribly anemic, thin 80's digital sound but in the end that turned out to be a bit of a blessing because it made it a perfect machine for processed drums. It was like a blank canvas to be painted with effects processors. I still have it to this day and have used it now and then processed to the hilt. In the end I don't regret not buying the LinnDrum.

My biggest regret is not buying a dozen or so TB-303s and TR-606s for $50 each back in 87. I was in a pawnshop in Toronto and they had a stack of 606s and 303s piled up on the floor. There were at least a dozen of each. They were $50 each and I remember thinking "why the hell would someone pay 50 bucks for these weak non-MIDI machines that were a pain in the ass to program" (well at least the 303 was, the 606 wasn't too bad).

If only I had known what was lying in store for the 303, I would have bought every last one of them.

As for me personally, I think I much prefer using the emulated versions on my Toshiba Thrive over the real thing.
 
2012-07-16 09:41:30 AM  

Ghastly: xrayspx: I'd look forward to the film, there was a good doc on Bob Moog, and Synth Britannia on synth bands of the late '70s and early '80s in post-punk England. And say what you will subs, but in hip hop I'm sure cost was a factor, and the 808 really did power music forward for a decade. If affordable drum machines hadn't been available in the '80s, would rap music have gotten as many artists coming out with as many great (and many terrible) tracks?

The correct way to do platform evangelism beyond the grave is demonstrated by the Atari ST user: "It's one THIRD the price and the same specs, plus it's in color, and we have MIDI. We can run Mac OS too! Guys? Guys?"

I still used my Atari ST for the bulk of my MIDI processing until about 2 years ago when I finally and reluctantly retired the machine. Without the serial MIDI expansion port for Master Tracks Pro the ST, limited to only 16 midi channels, just didn't provide enough channels to run all my synths. My Korg Microstation, Kawai K5-m, Yamaha TG-100, and Casio LD-80 could each eat up a full 16 channels by themselves.


I love hearing about stuff staying in use that long, because it's good at what it does.

I often really wish I hadn't gotten rid of my ST, with the $400 170MB ammo-box hard drive. The only thing I ever used the super-awesome MiDi ports for was MidiMaze, and even then only like twice. That machine really did set me up for a career early on. I broke my first copy protection (Lemmings), and can't even begin to calculate the hours spent in a terminal exploring phone networks and Internet connected Unix machines at 1200bps.

The only downsides were having to adjust the power supply voltage live as the machine heated up and having to hand-solder RAM chips to each other to do a memory upgrade :-) Emulation just isn't the same, since it can't replicate the frustration accurately enough.

There's a whole lot of inside-info at Dad Hacker about the history of Atari pre-and post buyout, and the genesis of the ST, why certain things were kept in or out of the machine (money and expediency were unsurprisingly about the only answers), and a real explanation of some of the weird floppy disk controller hackery we all encountered, usually as we hurled useless disks at something expensive.

/Can still work up a good "B....B...BUT Mick Fleetwood!" (Really, the best they could come up with was Mick Fleetwood? Oh, and Tangerine Dream.)
//OT, all these years and I've still only favorited one Farker, and it's a Canadian, go figure. Always look forward to seeing green.
 
2012-07-16 11:34:13 PM  

xrayspx:
I love hearing about stuff staying in use that long, because it's good at what it does.


The only reason I really stopped using it was because I simply didn't have the room for two PCs at my music workstation anymore and I was able to get the Master Tracks Pro software for the PC.
 
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