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(MSNBC)   OH you better believe that's a strongly worded letter   (worldnews.msnbc.msn.com) divider line 112
    More: Obvious, chemical weapons, Syrian Ali Bakran, Bashar al-Assad, Bashar, United Nations Security Council, Zawiya, Assad, NBC News  
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16933 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jul 2012 at 10:40 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-13 11:23:11 PM

Mantour: BronyMedic: there their theyre: We also don't have any biological weapons either....honestly I am sure we destroyed those stockpiles and burned the research.

The United States maintains a "defensive" bioweapons program at USAMRIID in Fort Detrick, Maryland. The UK does the same thing at Porton Down Military Complex. The US also maintains one of three known samples of Smallpox virus there, which would be a bioweapons wet dream.

Fun fact: The Russians maintain the other 1/3. And it's not like the Russians have ever sold anything nefarious.

using smallpox in wartime, It's been done:

[www.history.org image 400x497]

[rangersoftheohiocompany.org image 689x682]



/Sir Jeffrey Amherst (he became the Comander-in-chief of the Forces after the death of General Wolfe in Quebec City) shown here in Joseph Blackburn's 1758 painting, suggested Bouquet infect the Indians with smallpox.

//He was also the first British Governor General in the territories that eventually became Canada. Numerous places and streets are named for him, both in Canada and the United States. Amherst is also infamous for catalyzing the first historical incidents of biological warfare, as he endorsed and commanded giving blankets infected with smallpox to American Indians.


That's actually pretty seriously in doubt. The letter says "give them blankets from the smallpox hospital." Nothing in the letter suggests that they were to be USED blankets. But it has become legendary by now, and it's useless to expect people to care about what the original document said. Especially when it's a PC "white man evil villain" situation. Zinn said it, must be right! Matt Damon!
 
2012-07-13 11:26:42 PM

Infernalist: fark'emfeed'emfish: Infernalist: Well, it's a sticky subject.

Let's say Assad goes 'full retard' and gasses his own people and the rebel forces...

Do we drop a tactical nuke on him? Do we have the 'right' to do so?

How would Russia/China react to seeing that? I sincerely doubt that they'd respond with a cool head.

Better yet, Assad contacts the Chinese/Russians first and has them play interference...The Russians and Chinese preemptively let NATO know that any attack on Syria will be seen as an attack on their interests...

In all actuality, if Assad does use those weapons, we'll help cover up that fact simply to avoid having to retaliate as we've said that we would...Because no President is going to want to be the first President since Truman to drop nukes on a foreign country.

you think nuking a civilian population is an effective means to retaliate for gassing the same?

Despite the image of huge mushroom clouds rising up over shattered cities, you might be surprised to learn that a good number of our nuclear weapons are not the city-killer types, but smaller tactical weapons designed to be used in the field against military forces.


so they say, have you tested 'em?
/PR
 
2012-07-13 11:28:52 PM

EnviroDude: You know, there are some that would believe these chemicals once belonged to Saddam


They probably did. But we'll never know because you know...we let the Iraqi's hang the son-of-a-biatch.
 
2012-07-13 11:30:46 PM

BronyMedic: And it's not like the Russians have ever sold anything nefarious.


For example?
 
2012-07-13 11:30:53 PM

JohnAnnArbor: Mantour: BronyMedic: there their theyre: We also don't have any biological weapons either....honestly I am sure we destroyed those stockpiles and burned the research.

The United States maintains a "defensive" bioweapons program at USAMRIID in Fort Detrick, Maryland. The UK does the same thing at Porton Down Military Complex. The US also maintains one of three known samples of Smallpox virus there, which would be a bioweapons wet dream.

Fun fact: The Russians maintain the other 1/3. And it's not like the Russians have ever sold anything nefarious.

using smallpox in wartime, It's been done:

[www.history.org image 400x497]

[rangersoftheohiocompany.org image 689x682]



/Sir Jeffrey Amherst (he became the Comander-in-chief of the Forces after the death of General Wolfe in Quebec City) shown here in Joseph Blackburn's 1758 painting, suggested Bouquet infect the Indians with smallpox.

//He was also the first British Governor General in the territories that eventually became Canada. Numerous places and streets are named for him, both in Canada and the United States. Amherst is also infamous for catalyzing the first historical incidents of biological warfare, as he endorsed and commanded giving blankets infected with smallpox to American Indians.

That's actually pretty seriously in doubt. The letter says "give them blankets from the smallpox hospital." Nothing in the letter suggests that they were to be USED blankets. But it has become legendary by now, and it's useless to expect people to care about what the original document said. Especially when it's a PC "white man evil villain" situation. Zinn said it, must be right! Matt Damon!


Bad memory. Amherst had that sterling idea, but the doubt comes as to whether it was actually carried out (it's always presented as fact that it was). The writing I was thinking of was from a subordinate discussing what was supposed to be a "keeping the peace" type meeting with the Indians. See the indented text, the direct quote.

/Amherst still had that idea, so he's a bad guy no matter how you slice it.
 
2012-07-13 11:31:53 PM

fark'emfeed'emfish: Infernalist: fark'emfeed'emfish: Infernalist: Well, it's a sticky subject.

Let's say Assad goes 'full retard' and gasses his own people and the rebel forces...

Do we drop a tactical nuke on him? Do we have the 'right' to do so?

How would Russia/China react to seeing that? I sincerely doubt that they'd respond with a cool head.

Better yet, Assad contacts the Chinese/Russians first and has them play interference...The Russians and Chinese preemptively let NATO know that any attack on Syria will be seen as an attack on their interests...

In all actuality, if Assad does use those weapons, we'll help cover up that fact simply to avoid having to retaliate as we've said that we would...Because no President is going to want to be the first President since Truman to drop nukes on a foreign country.

you think nuking a civilian population is an effective means to retaliate for gassing the same?

Despite the image of huge mushroom clouds rising up over shattered cities, you might be surprised to learn that a good number of our nuclear weapons are not the city-killer types, but smaller tactical weapons designed to be used in the field against military forces.

so they say, have you tested 'em?
/PR


Did 'I' test 'em? No, of course not.

Have they been tested? Of course they have, in all the usual ways, back when such weapons were designed and regularly tested.

Considering these are the experts who get paid obscene amounts of money to be right, I think I can trust them to know what they're talking about when they give estimates of blast radius and damage estimates.

Despite what people might think, nuclear weapons were/are a varied species of devices, with any number of potential targets from strategic weapons targeting strategic targets like cities. And tactical weapons designed to be used in the field against military targets.
 
2012-07-13 11:32:00 PM

JohnAnnArbor: Mantour: BronyMedic: there their theyre: We also don't have any biological weapons either....honestly I am sure we destroyed those stockpiles and burned the research.

The United States maintains a "defensive" bioweapons program at USAMRIID in Fort Detrick, Maryland. The UK does the same thing at Porton Down Military Complex. The US also maintains one of three known samples of Smallpox virus there, which would be a bioweapons wet dream.

Fun fact: The Russians maintain the other 1/3. And it's not like the Russians have ever sold anything nefarious.

using smallpox in wartime, It's been done:

[www.history.org image 400x497]

[rangersoftheohiocompany.org image 689x682]



/Sir Jeffrey Amherst (he became the Comander-in-chief of the Forces after the death of General Wolfe in Quebec City) shown here in Joseph Blackburn's 1758 painting, suggested Bouquet infect the Indians with smallpox.

//He was also the first British Governor General in the territories that eventually became Canada. Numerous places and streets are named for him, both in Canada and the United States. Amherst is also infamous for catalyzing the first historical incidents of biological warfare, as he endorsed and commanded giving blankets infected with smallpox to American Indians.

That's actually pretty seriously in doubt. The letter says "give them blankets from the smallpox hospital." Nothing in the letter suggests that they were to be USED blankets. But it has become legendary by now, and it's useless to expect people to care about what the original document said. Especially when it's a PC "white man evil villain" situation. Zinn said it, must be right! Matt Damon!


In doubt?

Documents
 
2012-07-13 11:32:13 PM

Daedalus27: The world stood by when Saddam Hussein gassed the Kurdish civilians in rebellion.


Hey, that's not true! Bush Sr was so upset that he almost interrupted his golf game!
 
2012-07-13 11:32:58 PM
Wait, this is Fark. Am I allowed to correct a mistake, or should I defend it to the ends of the Internet, insisting my original thought was correct against all evidence?

Thoughts?
 
2012-07-13 11:34:38 PM
It should be also noted that biological warfare has humble beginnings.

There are Middle-Age records of catapults being used to fling dead animal carcasses into besieged castles and wells in order to poison their water supplies.
 
2012-07-13 11:36:32 PM

Infernalist: It should be also noted that biological warfare has humble beginnings.

There are Middle-Age records of catapults being used to fling dead animal carcasses into besieged castles and wells in order to poison their water supplies.


sf.looneylabs.com
 
2012-07-13 11:38:54 PM

JohnAnnArbor: Infernalist: It should be also noted that biological warfare has humble beginnings.

There are Middle-Age records of catapults being used to fling dead animal carcasses into besieged castles and wells in order to poison their water supplies.

[sf.looneylabs.com image 216x302]


Oh, he looks so excited. I'm guessing he sees that he's going to land in the well.

/water park!
 
2012-07-13 11:40:54 PM
The best way to respond to an evil regime using wmds on their civilians would be to kill some of the remaining civikiand with nukes and let what happens after kill the rest. That is obviously the best response.
 
2012-07-13 11:41:39 PM
Civilians and.

/phone
 
2012-07-13 11:41:57 PM

BronyMedic: http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/syria/facility.htm


Hey, the filter didn't break up your URL. Is this a new feature?
 
2012-07-13 11:41:58 PM

JohnAnnArbor: Wait, this is Fark. Am I allowed to correct a mistake, or should I defend it to the ends of the Internet, insisting my original thought was correct against all evidence?

Thoughts?


Just go full on Derp and then get an alt... It's what all the cool kids do.
 
2012-07-13 11:43:19 PM

Mantour: He was also the first British Governor General in the territories that eventually became Canada. Numerous places and streets are named for him, both in Canada and the United States. Amherst is also infamous for catalyzing the first historical incidents of biological warfare, as he endorsed and commanded giving blankets infected with smallpox to American Indians.


What is not clear is this: in 1758, was it understood that smallpox was transmissible via blanket?
Miasma theory of infectious disease was still mainstream in the 1800's. Louis Pasteur was not on the scene yet.
 
2012-07-13 11:45:11 PM

Infernalist: fark'emfeed'emfish: Infernalist: fark'emfeed'emfish: Infernalist: Well, it's a sticky subject.

Let's say Assad goes 'full retard' and gasses his own people and the rebel forces...

Do we drop a tactical nuke on him? Do we have the 'right' to do so?

How would Russia/China react to seeing that? I sincerely doubt that they'd respond with a cool head.

Better yet, Assad contacts the Chinese/Russians first and has them play interference...The Russians and Chinese preemptively let NATO know that any attack on Syria will be seen as an attack on their interests...

In all actuality, if Assad does use those weapons, we'll help cover up that fact simply to avoid having to retaliate as we've said that we would...Because no President is going to want to be the first President since Truman to drop nukes on a foreign country.

you think nuking a civilian population is an effective means to retaliate for gassing the same?

Despite the image of huge mushroom clouds rising up over shattered cities, you might be surprised to learn that a good number of our nuclear weapons are not the city-killer types, but smaller tactical weapons designed to be used in the field against military forces.

so they say, have you tested 'em?
/PR

Did 'I' test 'em? No, of course not.

Have they been tested? Of course they have, in all the usual ways, back when such weapons were designed and regularly tested.

Considering these are the experts who get paid obscene amounts of money to be right, I think I can trust them to know what they're talking about when they give estimates of blast radius and damage estimates.

Despite what people might think, nuclear weapons were/are a varied species of devices, with any number of potential targets from strategic weapons targeting strategic targets like cities. And tactical weapons designed to be used in the field against military targets.


'till they've tested one in your backyard you should probably take the word of the military industrial complex with a grain of salt. they're not paid to increase anyone's standard of living.
 
2012-07-13 11:46:00 PM

fusillade762: BronyMedic: http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/syria/facility.htm

Hey, the filter didn't break up your URL. Is this a new feature?


Longer urls will now fit into the wider allowed space. So yes and no. I'm sure at some point it will cut off. Go test it in the sandbox (thread #69) if you want to see just how long it will go.

But you should do links anyway just to be a nice guy.
 
2012-07-13 11:46:17 PM

cloud_van_dame: Louis Pasteur was not on the scene yet.


He was working on a cure for Anthrax...........never mind that shiat, Here comes Mongo!
 
2012-07-13 11:49:50 PM

BSABSVR: Today the UN. Is a powerless organization. Yesterday they were 5 minutes from confiscating your guns.


That's doublethink for you.
 
2012-07-13 11:53:56 PM
I'm pretty sure that there was a casual basic cause and effect being noticed re: smallpox and its transmission via blankets and other things that came in close contact with the infected/uninfected but they didn't know how or why it did what it did, just that it did it. People weren't stupid back then, just uninformed about the mechanics of nature.
 
2012-07-13 11:59:32 PM

cloud_van_dame: Mantour: He was also the first British Governor General in the territories that eventually became Canada. Numerous places and streets are named for him, both in Canada and the United States. Amherst is also infamous for catalyzing the first historical incidents of biological warfare, as he endorsed and commanded giving blankets infected with smallpox to American Indians.

What is not clear is this: in 1758, was it understood that smallpox was transmissible via blanket?
Miasma theory of infectious disease was still mainstream in the 1800's. Louis Pasteur was not on the scene yet.


Pasteur, pillar of microbiology, along with Koch became famous for his victory and complete refutation of the Aristotelian ''Spontaneous Generation'' theory with the use of the microscope and infecting healthy rats with TB using needles.

''Bad Air'' theory was indeed the mainstream but I imagine they believed that clothing of the dead were contaminated with ''Bad Air'' too. They knew bodies had to be buried and the clothing of the infected be burned and not reused,
 
2012-07-14 12:01:19 AM

EnviroDude: You know, there are some that would believe these chemicals once belonged to Saddam


HERP DERP
 
2012-07-14 12:02:44 AM

Mantour: ''Bad Air'' theory was indeed the mainstream but I imagine they believed that clothing of the dead were contaminated with ''Bad Air'' too. They knew bodies had to be buried and the clothing of the infected be burned and not reused,


That is what I wanted to know. Thanks.
 
2012-07-14 12:07:07 AM

Infernalist: sycraft: BronyMedic: Nadie_AZ: Let me guess. They are moving WMDs and chemical weapons to Syria Iraq some evil place and we have to stop them before their reply comes in the form of a mushroom cloud?

I'm gonna pass on this one.

The fact that Syria maintains an offensive military NBC program is not really a secret. We've known for decades they did.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/syria/facility.htm

On the other hand, the fact remains that US and NATO doctrine regarding the use of NBC weapons on allied forces, UN peacekeping forces, or on a civilian population, would provoke overwhelming retribution. Probibly, as you mentioned before, something that generates a mushroom cloud.

They gas you with Sarin, you introduce them to the five 300KT MIRVs ontop of a Minuteman III missile. That's the American way.

It's because the US doctrine allows for WMD use in response to the use of WMDs, and the US only has one kind anymore: Nukes.

'Officially', we have no chemical arsenal. Unofficially, it's a whole other story.


In 1993, the United States signed the Chemical Weapons Treaty, which required the destruction of all chemical weapon agents, dispersal systems, chemical weapons production facilities by April 2012. The U.S. prohibition on the transport of chemical weapons has meant that destruction facilities had to be constructed at each of the U.S.'s nine storage facilities. The U.S. met the first three of the treaty's four deadlines, destroying 45% of its stockpile of chemical weapons by 2007. However, official expectations for the date of complete elimination of all chemical weapons was after the treaty deadline of 2012.
 
2012-07-14 12:08:33 AM

Mantour: ''Bad Air'' theory was indeed the mainstream but I imagine they believed that clothing of the dead were contaminated with ''Bad Air'' too. They knew bodies had to be buried and the clothing of the infected be burned and not reused,


There was an Austrian doctor who committed suicide after his discovery that having the medical residents go from the morgue to the labor ward without washing their hands was the reason why deaths in childbirth were much higher in hospitals than home births with midwives. I think that was after 1758.

At least he got them to start washing their hands before he killed himself.
 
2012-07-14 12:10:20 AM

cloud_van_dame: Mantour: ''Bad Air'' theory was indeed the mainstream but I imagine they believed that clothing of the dead were contaminated with ''Bad Air'' too. They knew bodies had to be buried and the clothing of the infected be burned and not reused,

That is what I wanted to know. Thanks.


They even had primitive long-nosed "gas masks" during plague times, with spices stuffed in the nose part in an attempt to ward off the "bad air."
 
2012-07-14 12:10:47 AM

humanshrapnel: You know, there are some that would believe the sun revolves around the earth.


Especially if you point out that scientists are liberal and invoke Jesus.
 
2012-07-14 12:11:05 AM

BronyMedic: there their theyre: We also don't have any biological weapons either....honestly I am sure we destroyed those stockpiles and burned the research.

The United States maintains a "defensive" bioweapons program at USAMRIID in Fort Detrick, Maryland. The UK does the same thing at Porton Down Military Complex. The US also maintains one of three known samples of Smallpox virus there, which would be a bioweapons wet dream.

Fun fact: The Russians maintain the other 1/3. And it's not like the Russians have ever sold anything nefarious.


Who owns the third one?
 
2012-07-14 12:12:35 AM

Mazzic518: Who owns the third one?


Would not be surprised if it was France. Sanofi-Pasteur.
 
2012-07-14 12:13:21 AM

cloud_van_dame: Mantour: ''Bad Air'' theory was indeed the mainstream but I imagine they believed that clothing of the dead were contaminated with ''Bad Air'' too. They knew bodies had to be buried and the clothing of the infected be burned and not reused,

There was an Austrian doctor who committed suicide after his discovery that having the medical residents go from the morgue to the labor ward without washing their hands was the reason why deaths in childbirth were much higher in hospitals than home births with midwives. I think that was after 1758.

At least he got them to start washing their hands before he killed himself.


Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis
 
2012-07-14 12:16:18 AM

Mazzic518: Infernalist: sycraft: BronyMedic: Nadie_AZ: Let me guess. They are moving WMDs and chemical weapons to Syria Iraq some evil place and we have to stop them before their reply comes in the form of a mushroom cloud?

I'm gonna pass on this one.

The fact that Syria maintains an offensive military NBC program is not really a secret. We've known for decades they did.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/syria/facility.htm

On the other hand, the fact remains that US and NATO doctrine regarding the use of NBC weapons on allied forces, UN peacekeping forces, or on a civilian population, would provoke overwhelming retribution. Probibly, as you mentioned before, something that generates a mushroom cloud.

They gas you with Sarin, you introduce them to the five 300KT MIRVs ontop of a Minuteman III missile. That's the American way.

It's because the US doctrine allows for WMD use in response to the use of WMDs, and the US only has one kind anymore: Nukes.

'Officially', we have no chemical arsenal. Unofficially, it's a whole other story.

In 1993, the United States signed the Chemical Weapons Treaty, which required the destruction of all chemical weapon agents, dispersal systems, chemical weapons production facilities by April 2012. The U.S. prohibition on the transport of chemical weapons has meant that destruction facilities had to be constructed at each of the U.S.'s nine storage facilities. The U.S. met the first three of the treaty's four deadlines, destroying 45% of its stockpile of chemical weapons by 2007. However, official expectations for the date of complete elimination of all chemical weapons was after the treaty deadline of 2012.


Logistical issue. We don't have a trained chemical corps like in the old days. And the weapons themselves are all old, many leaking or otherwise unfit for actual use. Even if we wanted to, mounting a chemical attack would be very hard.
 
2012-07-14 12:17:48 AM
Mazzic518: Who owns the third one?

The CDC in Atlanta.
 
2012-07-14 12:18:38 AM
JohnAnnArbor: Logistical issue. We don't have a trained chemical corps like in the old days. And the weapons themselves are all old, many leaking or otherwise unfit for actual use. Even if we wanted to, mounting a chemical attack would be very hard.

The United States Army Chemical Corps would beg to differ on that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Corps

(fark won't let me link things)
 
2012-07-14 12:20:50 AM

Mazzic518:
In 1993, the United States signed the Chemical Weapons Treaty, which required the destruction of all chemical weapon agents, dispersal systems, chemical weapons production facilities by April 2012. The U.S. prohibition on the transport of chemical weapons has meant that destruction facilities had to be constructed at each of the U.S.'s nine storage facilities. The U.S. met the first three of the treaty's four deadlines, destroying 45% of its stockpile of chemical weapons by 2007. However, official expectations for the date of complete elimination of all chemical weapons was after the treaty deadline of 2012.


Now, why may we have missed the deadline, given the bolded text above. I'll give you a hint: NIMBY
Every time they have proposed building an on-site thermal destruction system, people come out of the woodwork to oppose it, with no real solution on how to get rid of what is sitting there. Nobody wants it transported elsewhere, nobody wants it destroyed on site, nobody wants it stored where it already sits in secured bunkers. WTF are we supposed to do with it?

/Rant off
//Kinda drunk right now
 
2012-07-14 12:23:54 AM

BronyMedic: JohnAnnArbor: Logistical issue. We don't have a trained chemical corps like in the old days. And the weapons themselves are all old, many leaking or otherwise unfit for actual use. Even if we wanted to, mounting a chemical attack would be very hard.

The United States Army Chemical Corps would beg to differ on that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Corps

(fark won't let me link things)


Our mutual acquiescence, JohnAnnnArbor is having a bad night.
 
2012-07-14 12:27:12 AM

BronyMedic: JohnAnnArbor: Logistical issue. We don't have a trained chemical corps like in the old days. And the weapons themselves are all old, many leaking or otherwise unfit for actual use. Even if we wanted to, mounting a chemical attack would be very hard.

The United States Army Chemical Corps would beg to differ on that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Corps

(fark won't let me link things)


Yeah, but they're defensive-only now. I should have added the word "offensive." I'd be interested to hear when was the last time they trained to actually execute a chemical attack.
 
2012-07-14 12:27:16 AM

buzzcut73: Mazzic518:
In 1993, the United States signed the Chemical Weapons Treaty, which required the destruction of all chemical weapon agents, dispersal systems, chemical weapons production facilities by April 2012. The U.S. prohibition on the transport of chemical weapons has meant that destruction facilities had to be constructed at each of the U.S.'s nine storage facilities. The U.S. met the first three of the treaty's four deadlines, destroying 45% of its stockpile of chemical weapons by 2007. However, official expectations for the date of complete elimination of all chemical weapons was after the treaty deadline of 2012.

Now, why may we have missed the deadline, given the bolded text above. I'll give you a hint: NIMBY
Every time they have proposed building an on-site thermal destruction system, people come out of the woodwork to oppose it, with no real solution on how to get rid of what is sitting there. Nobody wants it transported elsewhere, nobody wants it destroyed on site, nobody wants it stored where it already sits in secured bunkers. WTF are we supposed to do with it?

/Rant off
//Kinda drunk right now


Send it all my way i'll "destroy" all of it....
 
2012-07-14 12:29:12 AM

Mantour: using smallpox in wartime, It's been done:

[www.history.org image 400x497]
[rangersoftheohiocompany.org image 689x682]

//He was also the first British Governor General in the territories that eventually became Canada. Numerous places and streets are named for him, both in Canada and the United States. Amherst is also infamous for catalyzing the first historical incidents of biological warfare, as he endorsed and commanded giving blankets infected with smallpox to American Indians.


JohnAnnArbor: That's actually pretty seriously in doubt. The letter says "give them blankets from the smallpox hospital." Nothing in the letter suggests that they were to be USED blankets. But it has become legendary by now, and it's useless to expect people to care about what the original document said. Especially when it's a PC "white man evil villain" situation. Zinn said it, must be right! Matt Damon!


It's "pretty seriously in doubt" the same way the Theory of Evolution and the Holocaust are "pretty seriously in doubt."

To be fair, the "it" here is that Amherst TOLD Bouquet to infect Native Americans with smallpox. What one can honestly doubt is whether or not Bouquet went through with it.

But hey, historical revisionism and denial: it's not just for Nazi sympathizers anymore.
 
2012-07-14 12:31:08 AM

buzzcut73: Mazzic518:
In 1993, the United States signed the Chemical Weapons Treaty, which required the destruction of all chemical weapon agents, dispersal systems, chemical weapons production facilities by April 2012. The U.S. prohibition on the transport of chemical weapons has meant that destruction facilities had to be constructed at each of the U.S.'s nine storage facilities. The U.S. met the first three of the treaty's four deadlines, destroying 45% of its stockpile of chemical weapons by 2007. However, official expectations for the date of complete elimination of all chemical weapons was after the treaty deadline of 2012.

Now, why may we have missed the deadline, given the bolded text above. I'll give you a hint: NIMBY
Every time they have proposed building an on-site thermal destruction system, people come out of the woodwork to oppose it, with no real solution on how to get rid of what is sitting there. Nobody wants it transported elsewhere, nobody wants it destroyed on site, nobody wants it stored where it already sits in secured bunkers. WTF are we supposed to do with it?

/Rant off
//Kinda drunk right now


For a while, we were destroying them in the middle of the Pacific, at Johnston Atoll. Not anymore, though.
 
2012-07-14 12:32:38 AM

ciberido: Mantour: using smallpox in wartime, It's been done:

[www.history.org image 400x497]
[rangersoftheohiocompany.org image 689x682]

//He was also the first British Governor General in the territories that eventually became Canada. Numerous places and streets are named for him, both in Canada and the United States. Amherst is also infamous for catalyzing the first historical incidents of biological warfare, as he endorsed and commanded giving blankets infected with smallpox to American Indians.

JohnAnnArbor: That's actually pretty seriously in doubt. The letter says "give them blankets from the smallpox hospital." Nothing in the letter suggests that they were to be USED blankets. But it has become legendary by now, and it's useless to expect people to care about what the original document said. Especially when it's a PC "white man evil villain" situation. Zinn said it, must be right! Matt Damon!

It's "pretty seriously in doubt" the same way the Theory of Evolution and the Holocaust are "pretty seriously in doubt."

To be fair, the "it" here is that Amherst TOLD Bouquet to infect Native Americans with smallpox. What one can honestly doubt is whether or not Bouquet went through with it.

But hey, historical revisionism and denial: it's not just for Nazi sympathizers anymore.


Scroll down.....
 
2012-07-14 12:33:15 AM

JohnAnnArbor: Infernalist: It should be also noted that biological warfare has humble beginnings.

There are Middle-Age records of catapults being used to fling dead animal carcasses into besieged castles and wells in order to poison their water supplies.

[sf.looneylabs.com image 216x302]


Fetchez la vache!
 
2012-07-14 12:46:53 AM
not to worry, they can't use them because they can't read the Iraqi instructions.
 
2012-07-14 12:47:03 AM

JohnAnnArbor: Scroll down.....


*shrug*

Such is the nature of real-time communication.
 
2012-07-14 01:07:07 AM
Size 14 type...

... ITALIC
 
2012-07-14 01:33:03 AM
upload.wikimedia.org

Oh hai guyz. What is up yo?
 
2012-07-14 01:39:35 AM

RoxtarRyan: My enlistment ends in 11 months... please don't start another farking stupid war over oil and "evidence".


The eldest son of a friend of mine begins his (Army) in October. Oy.
 
2012-07-14 02:09:28 AM
When it come to the US govt claiming a country has WMDs, I only have one thing to say about that...

Fool me once, shame on - shame on you. Fool me - you can't get fooled again.
 
2012-07-14 02:17:54 AM
The Southern Dandy: When it come to the US govt claimingstating a known fact about Syria that is not subject to the same debate as it was in Iraq, a country has WMDs, I only have one thing to say about that...

Fool me once, shame on - shame on you. Fool me - you can't get fooled again.
 
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