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(Georgia Institute of Technology)   Scientists, having never seen a horror movie, splice 500 million year old DNA strand with E. coli bacteria. What could go wrong?   (gatech.edu) divider line 65
    More: Interesting, DNA, bacteria, E. coli, existence, Georgia Institute of Technology, genetic sequence, bacterial strains, Astrobiology  
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2012-07-13 10:55:15 AM  
That's pretty cool. I'm going to have to read that paper.
 
2012-07-13 10:56:47 AM  
well, since labs do this every day with many other genes, it's not really that bizarre. i do this with chicken genes. and mouse genes. it's called recombinant dna and it's used to express a gene; it's nothing like the (fake) genetics of jurassic park. the point of that (fake) science was to replace dna that had degraded in the mosquitos and create an animal with a full genome (which is impossible at this point). we have whole dna sequences of wooly mammoths, yet we have no wooly mammoths because having the complete dna sequence is useless at this point. it's like having a blueprint for a house--you don't just throw the blueprint of the house on the ground an expect a house to build itself.
 
2012-07-13 11:01:33 AM  

talulahgosh: well, since labs do this every day with many other genes, it's not really that bizarre. i do this with chicken genes. and mouse genes. it's called recombinant dna and it's used to express a gene; it's nothing like the (fake) genetics of jurassic park. the point of that (fake) science was to replace dna that had degraded in the mosquitos and create an animal with a full genome (which is impossible at this point). we have whole dna sequences of wooly mammoths, yet we have no wooly mammoths because having the complete dna sequence is useless at this point. it's like having a blueprint for a house--you don't just throw the blueprint of the house on the ground an expect a house to build itself.


Thanks Dr. Buzzkill

/you could have waited for at least a FEW Zombie Apocalypse jokes
 
2012-07-13 11:08:35 AM  
When the researchers looked closer, they noticed that every EF-Tu gene did not accumulate mutations. Instead, the modern proteins that interact with the ancient EF-Tu inside of the bacteria had mutated and these mutations were responsible for the rapid adaptation that increased the bacteria's fitness. In short, the ancient gene has not yet mutated to become more similar to its modern form, but rather, the bacteria found a new evolutionary trajectory to adapt.

That is f*ckin' cool.
 
2012-07-13 11:11:57 AM  
.....splice 500 million year old DNA strand with E. coli bacteria......

im.glogster.com
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-07-13 11:16:44 AM  

talulahgosh: well, since labs do this every day with many other genes, it's not really that bizarre. i do this with chicken genes. and mouse genes. it's called recombinant dna and it's used to express a gene; it's nothing like the (fake) genetics of jurassic park. the point of that (fake) science was to replace dna that had degraded in the mosquitos and create an animal with a full genome (which is impossible at this point). we have whole dna sequences of wooly mammoths, yet we have no wooly mammoths because having the complete dna sequence is useless at this point. it's like having a blueprint for a house--you don't just throw the blueprint of the house on the ground an expect a house to build itself.


Do you do it in a lab or, uh, recreationally?
 
2012-07-13 11:21:31 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thanks Dr. Buzzkill

/you could have waited for at least a FEW Zombie Apocalypse jokes


hey that doesn't mean it's not cool!!! it's just not mad science or anything crazy.

vpb: Do you do it in a lab or, uh, recreationally?


heigho!!!
oh wait, you mean recombinant dna work. in a lab. that's right, i get paid (very little) to do cool shiat!!
 
2012-07-13 11:21:54 AM  
"Welcome...to Jurassic dysentery."
 
2012-07-13 11:27:03 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: talulahgosh: well, since labs do this every day with many other genes, it's not really that bizarre. i do this with chicken genes. and mouse genes. it's called recombinant dna and it's used to express a gene; it's nothing like the (fake) genetics of jurassic park. the point of that (fake) science was to replace dna that had degraded in the mosquitos and create an animal with a full genome (which is impossible at this point). we have whole dna sequences of wooly mammoths, yet we have no wooly mammoths because having the complete dna sequence is useless at this point. it's like having a blueprint for a house--you don't just throw the blueprint of the house on the ground an expect a house to build itself.

Thanks Dr. Buzzkill

/you could have waited for at least a FEW Zombie Apocalypse jokes


This.

Someone hasn't had enough coffee to be tolerable yet.
 
2012-07-13 11:41:11 AM  

gopher321: "Welcome...to Jurassic dysentery."


Ha, 500 million years ago was during the Cambrian Explosion.
 
2012-07-13 12:16:46 PM  

Richard Freckle: gopher321: "Welcome...to Jurassic dysentery."

Ha, 500 million years ago was during the Cambrian Explosion.


Description of what happens if your gut gets colonized by one of these recombinant e coli strains?
 
2012-07-13 12:17:39 PM  

make me some tea: When the researchers looked closer, they noticed that every EF-Tu gene did not accumulate mutations. Instead, the modern proteins that interact with the ancient EF-Tu inside of the bacteria had mutated and these mutations were responsible for the rapid adaptation that increased the bacteria's fitness. In short, the ancient gene has not yet mutated to become more similar to its modern form, but rather, the bacteria found a new evolutionary trajectory to adapt.

That is f*ckin' cool.


Um. Yeah but what if it gets out of the lab and kills us all with the super dysentery?
 
2012-07-13 12:18:38 PM  
Cool. Someone get started on power armor, I want to kill some super mutants.
 
2012-07-13 12:18:52 PM  
e-coli???

arseholes
 
2012-07-13 12:19:05 PM  
Scientists, having never seen a horror movie, splice 500 million year old DNA strand with E. coli bacteria. What could go wrong?

I'll tell you what can go wrong. It can give people memory loss. So much so that this thread will be forgotten
 
2012-07-13 12:20:41 PM  
I smell chicken..
 
2012-07-13 12:20:44 PM  

gopher321: "Welcome...to Jurassic dysentery."


Dysentery (Amoebic) is caused by Entamoeba histolytica,not http://E.coli/ Think the Falkland Island and why the Argentinians attacked the boat carrying potable water.

http://E.coli/ can cause Hamburger's disease, or in this case, Brontosaurus burger's disease!

images.wikia.com
 
2012-07-13 12:25:11 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Scientists, having never seen a horror movie, splice 500 million year old DNA strand with E. coli bacteria. What could go wrong?

I'll tell you what can go wrong. It can give people memory loss. So much so that this thread will be forgotten


It's just a headline mutation. Let the fittest survive.
Oh, this is Fark. Should it be the least fit?
 
2012-07-13 12:28:31 PM  
I have always thought as this gene splicing becomes more of a regular thing, that some day they are going to create something which is going to be very bad and it will get away from them.
 
2012-07-13 12:29:22 PM  

WelldeadLink: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Scientists, having never seen a horror movie, splice 500 million year old DNA strand with E. coli bacteria. What could go wrong?

I'll tell you what can go wrong. It can give people memory loss. So much so that this thread will be forgotten

It's just a headline mutation. Let the fittest survive.
Oh, this is Fark. Should it be the least fit?


Try "drunkest".
 
2012-07-13 12:30:08 PM  
"Get your own dirt".
 
2012-07-13 12:30:50 PM  
I sure hope the article's ending was a rhetorical question. "Do organisms have a predetermined state to evolve to?"

They're evolving based on what the organism is subjected to. It's is a reactionary process, and indeed is the essential definition of life itself. That's been established a long time ago.

Is someone suggesting the organism is psychic or a traveler between dimensions and will react to things that don't exist, based on a blueprint that maps out these mutations that adequately solve the survival question at every stage of it's future?

I mean seriously.. what did anyone think was the other viable option here?
 
2012-07-13 12:30:59 PM  

bim1154: I have always thought as this gene splicing becomes more of a regular thing, that some day they are going to create something which is going to be very bad and it will get away from them.


Like this little guy?:
images.wikia.com
 
2012-07-13 12:31:20 PM  

talulahgosh: well, since labs do this every day with many other genes, it's not really that bizarre. i do this with chicken genes. and mouse genes. it's called recombinant dna and it's used to express a gene; it's nothing like the (fake) genetics of jurassic park. the point of that (fake) science was to replace dna that had degraded in the mosquitos and create an animal with a full genome (which is impossible at this point). we have whole dna sequences of wooly mammoths, yet we have no wooly mammoths because having the complete dna sequence is useless at this point. it's like having a blueprint for a house--you don't just throw the blueprint of the house on the ground an expect a house to build itself.



www.linearrecumbent.com

My father calls these "recombinant" bikes. I find it funny, so I don't correct him.
 
2012-07-13 12:32:05 PM  
Pictured: Next Friday.

i48.tinypic.com
 
2012-07-13 12:33:42 PM  
It fixes the cable?
 
2012-07-13 12:34:14 PM  

Dead-Guy: I sure hope the article's ending was a rhetorical question. "Do organisms have a predetermined state to evolve to?"

They're evolving based on what the organism is subjected to. It's is a reactionary process, and indeed is the essential definition of life itself. That's been established a long time ago.

Is someone suggesting the organism is psychic or a traveler between dimensions and will react to things that don't exist, based on a blueprint that maps out these mutations that adequately solve the survival question at every stage of it's future?

I mean seriously.. what did anyone think was the other viable option here?


God?
 
2012-07-13 12:35:51 PM  
What could go wrong? A string of repeats...
 
2012-07-13 12:36:39 PM  
The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?
 
2012-07-13 12:38:05 PM  
And don't say "your mom".
 
2012-07-13 12:38:59 PM  

big pig peaches: The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?


Not sure how good it would be, but insects stuck in amber would be a good start.
 
2012-07-13 12:39:02 PM  

big pig peaches: The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?


The haunted depths of subby's mom's vagina?
 
2012-07-13 12:39:20 PM  
Is this Repeat Week here on Fark?
 
2012-07-13 12:39:45 PM  
Has something changed from when they did this like two days ago? And it was posted to Fark?
 
2012-07-13 12:42:52 PM  

big pig peaches: The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?



Time scoop.
 
2012-07-13 12:43:28 PM  
Is this Repeat Week here on Fark?
 
2012-07-13 12:43:42 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Is this Repeat Week here on Fark?


25 seconds

/shakes 500 million year old fist
 
2012-07-13 12:44:09 PM  

big pig peaches: The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?


big pig peaches: And don't say "your mom".


From your, uh, son?
 
2012-07-13 12:52:17 PM  

make me some tea: When the researchers looked closer, they noticed that every EF-Tu gene did not accumulate mutations. Instead, the modern proteins that interact with the ancient EF-Tu inside of the bacteria had mutated and these mutations were responsible for the rapid adaptation that increased the bacteria's fitness. In short, the ancient gene has not yet mutated to become more similar to its modern form, but rather, the bacteria found a new evolutionary trajectory to adapt.

That is f*ckin' cool.


EF-Tu you too, buddy.

/and the horse you rode in on
 
2012-07-13 12:53:55 PM  

big pig peaches: The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?


I can think of only one man who has a time machine and a desire to kill us all.

3.bp.blogspot.com

WTF is this guy's problem?
 
2012-07-13 12:54:53 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: talulahgosh: well, since labs do this every day with many other genes, it's not really that bizarre. i do this with chicken genes. and mouse genes. it's called recombinant dna and it's used to express a gene; it's nothing like the (fake) genetics of jurassic park. the point of that (fake) science was to replace dna that had degraded in the mosquitos and create an animal with a full genome (which is impossible at this point). we have whole dna sequences of wooly mammoths, yet we have no wooly mammoths because having the complete dna sequence is useless at this point. it's like having a blueprint for a house--you don't just throw the blueprint of the house on the ground an expect a house to build itself.

Thanks Dr. Buzzkill

/you could have waited for at least a FEW Zombie Apocalypse jokes


This.
 
2012-07-13 12:55:55 PM  

bim1154: big pig peaches: The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?

Not sure how good it would be, but insects stuck in amber would be a good start.


500 Ma there weren't insects or plants, so that's kinda out of the question.

It sounds like they basically reverse engineered the DNA from a gene that's present in all living bacteria. If they could look at all the variants of this gene in use today, they might be able to deduce its ancestral form that everything diverged from. But that sounds pretty insane, so I don't really know how exactly it was done. Here's the website for the guy that did that part, where it explains it a bit. That's way out of my field though.
 
2012-07-13 12:57:40 PM  

bim1154: big pig peaches: The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?

Not sure how good it would be, but insects stuck in amber would be a good start.


500 million year old insects? I don't think so.
 
2012-07-13 01:01:02 PM  
They allow this stuff in Georgia? I thought they outlawed evolution so it will never occur there.
 
2012-07-13 01:02:37 PM  

big pig peaches: The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?


They didn't get it from anywhere. The DNA sequence was extrapolated backwards from modern-day organisms using phylogenetic analysis, and then synthesized chemically. It would be like comparing all of the present-day Germanic languages and reconstructing the language spoken in northern Europe thousands of years ago: it might bear some resemblance to what was actually spoken, but it's certainly not the real thing.

Eric Gaucher is a charlatan with a good PR department.
 
2012-07-13 01:02:54 PM  
We're science: We're all about coulda, not shoulda.
 
2012-07-13 01:02:59 PM  
I didn't rape her your honor, I just spliced her jeans.
 
2012-07-13 01:06:29 PM  

Erix: bim1154: big pig peaches: The article leaves out one detail:

Where the hell did they get 500 million year old DNA from?

Not sure how good it would be, but insects stuck in amber would be a good start.

500 Ma there weren't insects or plants, so that's kinda out of the question.

It sounds like they basically reverse engineered the DNA from a gene that's present in all living bacteria. If they could look at all the variants of this gene in use today, they might be able to deduce its ancestral form that everything diverged from. But that sounds pretty insane, so I don't really know how exactly it was done. Here's the website for the guy that did that part, where it explains it a bit. That's way out of my field though.


I stand corrected... looked at the numbers wrong and was thinking something else. Thanks
 
2012-07-13 01:09:21 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Scientists, having never seen a horror movie, splice 500 million year old DNA strand with E. coli bacteria. What could go wrong?

I'll tell you what can go wrong. It can give people memory loss. So much so that this thread will be forgotten


I for one base all my experiments off of movie by people who have a very poor understanding how science actually works. Oddly none of my experiments have worked.

/Maybe I could get a paper out of it.
 
2012-07-13 01:09:27 PM  
The Red queen is going to be pissed.
 
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