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(Slate)   It's 95 degrees and you're miserable, and yet your body's internal temp is 98.6 degrees... How does this make sense? Sure it doesn't, but here comes the science   (slate.com) divider line 126
    More: Interesting, core temperature, metabolic rates, warm air, heat stress, cloud cover  
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20134 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jul 2012 at 3:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-13 07:45:15 AM

Mose: ChubbyTiger: Mose: There are so many people who do not grasp even the basics of heat transfer.

This surprises you?

No. But I'm perfectly baffled as to why this section of 10 inch ductil iron water main I have in the lab downstairs fractured, so I needed to write something that I knew was correct for a small victory this morning.

/don't steal my moment, on a Friday no less


Sorry, man. If it makes you feel any better, I've been that lab guy before, too. What do you mean 400 gallons of water landed on my three week experiment and all the notes?
 
2012-07-13 07:46:34 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: DownDaRiver: If it is, I don't want to sound prudish here, but if it is, they may want to seek some sort of phsyc eval or something. Sticking something up someone elses butt, even if it is just a cat, should be consensual. Again, I'm a dog person, I don't know a lot about cats, but I think I can say with some confidence that a cat can't give its consent to you, to sticking a thermometer up its butt.

Clearly you've never spent a few minutes skritching and scratching the base of a cat's tail. They are totally asking for a thermometer up the butt afterwards.

And don't even get Master Orphius started about wet q-tips and cats in heat.


Ya, I know about that base of the tail thing. I swear I used to give this one cat I knew orgasms doing that to it. But it would end up attacking my hand and running away when it couldn't take it anymore. Still, it never gave me any thought to grab a thermometer and stick it up its butt. I'd think a thermomiter probably isn't the safest thing to use anyway. Hate to have it snap off if the cat decided to turn and bolt off. That would not be good. The vet would probably have me arrested or something if I brought the cat in to have a broken thermometer removed from a cats butt. And not wanting to have the poor thing suffer. I'd have to get out my .22 and put it down. So, well probably just best not to risk the whole idea of sticking a thermometer up a cats butt.

Wet Q-tips? Cat in heat!? I don't even wanna. No don't wanna know much about that I'm pretty sure.
 
2012-07-13 07:46:51 AM

Boatmech: got to be one of the lamest strawman arguments ever made.


Tons, ounces, and fortnights are English units, but are inconvenient -- even to those well familiar with them -- when they give us awkward numbers to work with.

Unfamiliar metric units may be better than familiar English units if they give us easier numbers.

Celsius may be better than Fahrenheit, even if you are more familiar with the latter. It depends on what you're trying to do.

I'm sorry I confused you.
 
2012-07-13 07:53:33 AM

danduran: Entire article is written in Fahrenheit... too much conversion to bother reading....


Google is your friend when dealing with seppos.

profplump: HotWingAgenda: The lazy fark invented his own scale from 1 to 100 because he couldn't be arsed to do simple arithmetic.


I seem to recall that Anders Celsius' scale originally had the melting point of water at 100° and the boiling point at 0°, until someone else pointed out that that was silly.

Celsius did do other cromulent science, such as work on post-glacial rebound.

Also because he didn't understand instrument making -- Fahrenheit choose a scale that has 2^6 degrees between body temperature (which he defined as 96) and the freezing point of water. This allowed him to make very accurate scale markings by repeatedly bisecting the distance between those two points.

Also 0°F represents the temperature of a specific frigorific mixture, providing a third point of reference exactly 2^5 degrees from another known point, again allowing for simple bisection when producing scale markings.


And how exactly is this numerological wankery simpler or better than defining two points as 0 and 100 and bisecting for 50, again for 25 and 75 and so on?
 
2012-07-13 07:53:39 AM
0 degrees Fahrenheit is dangerously cold. 100 degrees Fahrenheit is dangerously hot. 50 is a pleasantly survivable, if crisp, medium. You can easily intuit the comfort level at any point between or beyond those limits.

I'd say Fahrenheit is perfectly calibrated for the weather. Celsius is the one that has the problem. Why would you use a scale for the weather where 40 degrees is really hot and even temperate areas routinely drop below zero in the winter? Might as well display the weather in Kelvin if you want to be scientific about it.

/It's 308 outside? Jesus Christ!
 
2012-07-13 07:54:21 AM

DownDaRiver: Uchiha_Cycliste: DownDaRiver: If it is, I don't want to sound prudish here, but if it is, they may want to seek some sort of phsyc eval or something. Sticking something up someone elses butt, even if it is just a cat, should be consensual. Again, I'm a dog person, I don't know a lot about cats, but I think I can say with some confidence that a cat can't give its consent to you, to sticking a thermometer up its butt.

Clearly you've never spent a few minutes skritching and scratching the base of a cat's tail. They are totally asking for a thermometer up the butt afterwards.

And don't even get Master Orphius started about wet q-tips and cats in heat.

Ya, I know about that base of the tail thing. I swear I used to give this one cat I knew orgasms doing that to it. But it would end up attacking my hand and running away when it couldn't take it anymore. Still, it never gave me any thought to grab a thermometer and stick it up its butt. I'd think a thermomiter probably isn't the safest thing to use anyway. Hate to have it snap off if the cat decided to turn and bolt off. That would not be good. The vet would probably have me arrested or something if I brought the cat in to have a broken thermometer removed from a cats butt. And not wanting to have the poor thing suffer. I'd have to get out my .22 and put it down. So, well probably just best not to risk the whole idea of sticking a thermometer up a cats butt.

Wet Q-tips? Cat in heat!? I don't even wanna. No don't wanna know much about that I'm pretty sure.


I was mostly joking about the butt skritching being an UTIA invitation.
Also, I take it you don't watch the venture brothers... which is a damn shame.
There was a scene where Orpheus was explaining that one time he tried to satiate his cat in heat, and that they could look at each other for weeks afterwards because she was a walking constant reminder of their shared shame.
 
2012-07-13 07:56:02 AM

Alonjar: Uchiha_Cycliste: It's really tough to pull down 5K cal/day, every day and without junk food or fast food. It's a hell of a lot of food. It takes a lot of time to cook and a lot of time to eat, and frankly it's a pain in the ass. Especially since whatever you are doing that requires such consumption levels is almost certain to leave you exhausted to the point that you don't want to cook or eat.

It is indeed very hard. I had to eat somewhere around 4k-5k calories a day or something during a bulking phase once, and god was it a pain in the ass. I had to eat the equivalent of a basic cheeseburger every hour that I was awake.


It sure is. When I get my miles up to 250+/week it's a constant struggle to eat.
There is first breakfast, ride to work, protein, second breakfast, lunch in cafeteria, bring the second lunch to the office, eat in a couple of hours, ride home, first dinner and protein, second dinner (the nightly lb of pasta) and third dinner before bed.
Get's the job done, but you have to be eating all the time everywhere. =(
 
2012-07-13 08:00:19 AM

crazydave023: I love running in 100 degree heat. It is intense. But you convince yourself that you cannot be stopped and you will complete your run.

/then again, I am crazy.



I've always loved playing sports in overcast, damp, drizzle. Can go on forever. Why yes, I've been told I'm cold as ice.
 
2012-07-13 08:02:08 AM

ShannonKW: English units aren't necessarily convenient, a fact you can verify by trying to buy your lunch meat by the ton, your motor fuel by the ounce, and your phone calls by the fortnight. You pick your units because you want easy numbers to work with, and Celsius gives you that.


I wasn't making any point about which temperature scale was more convenient in general or for any particular purpose -- just that °F was selected for very practical reasons related to reproducibility and accuracy, in contrast to people's general assumptions about non-SI units.

But if you're going to argue about convenience I'd suggest a temperature scale that put room temperature at 0 and medium-rare at 100 would provide more useful for many people.
 
2012-07-13 08:05:18 AM

iron de havilland: And how exactly is this numerological wankery simpler or better than defining two points as 0 and 100 and bisecting for 50, again for 25 and 75 and so on?


Because if you can bisect 64 repeatedly to get exactly 1 (and then 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, etc.). If you bisect 100 repeatedly you get 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25, 3.125, etc.
 
2012-07-13 08:15:24 AM

eraser8: All I know is that in summer, I'm constantly turning my pillows because my head makes them too hot.


www.sz-wholesaler.com

This thing is pretty decent. You fill it with water, put it between your pillow and pillow case and it acts like a heat sink for your head. You can actualy feel it drawing away the heat. Maybe about 6 or so hours later, it has warmed up to head temp, so then you just flip the pillow over to the normal side. An hour later you can flip it back.
 
2012-07-13 08:16:13 AM

profplump: But if you're going to argue about convenience I'd suggest a temperature scale that put room temperature at 0 and medium-rare at 100 would provide more useful for many people.


That comes dangerously close to gibberish. It must be time to stop posting (it is 5 AM). But first one more shot:

A temperature scale that defines room temperature as 0 and medium-rare as 100 would provide more convenience for many people.

/ Plus it would discourage people from overcooking their steaks
 
2012-07-13 08:21:41 AM

DownDaRiver: Did a GIS for a funny pic of a thermometer up someones butt.


Missed one.

i521.photobucket.com
 
2012-07-13 08:30:18 AM

crazydave023: I love running in 100 degree heat. It is intense. But you convince yourself that you cannot be stopped and you will complete your run.

/then again, I am crazy.


I did 2.5 miles in the last 100° day out here and I was easily convinced to stop. Had to walk the 2.5 miles home.

/you crazy! :)
 
2012-07-13 08:30:34 AM
^ Damn, I had no idea Tribbles were real!
 
2012-07-13 08:30:58 AM

ShannonKW: English units aren't necessarily convenient, a fact you can verify by trying to buy your lunch meat by the ton,


Clearly, you've never been to costco.
 
2012-07-13 08:44:44 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: DownDaRiver: Uchiha_Cycliste: DownDaRiver: If it is, I don't want to sound prudish here, but if it is, they may want to seek some sort of phsyc eval or something. Sticking something up someone elses butt, even if it is just a cat, should be consensual. Again, I'm a dog person, I don't know a lot about cats, but I think I can say with some confidence that a cat can't give its consent to you, to sticking a thermometer up its butt.

Clearly you've never spent a few minutes skritching and scratching the base of a cat's tail. They are totally asking for a thermometer up the butt afterwards.

And don't even get Master Orphius started about wet q-tips and cats in heat.

Ya, I know about that base of the tail thing. I swear I used to give this one cat I knew orgasms doing that to it. But it would end up attacking my hand and running away when it couldn't take it anymore. Still, it never gave me any thought to grab a thermometer and stick it up its butt. I'd think a thermomiter probably isn't the safest thing to use anyway. Hate to have it snap off if the cat decided to turn and bolt off. That would not be good. The vet would probably have me arrested or something if I brought the cat in to have a broken thermometer removed from a cats butt. And not wanting to have the poor thing suffer. I'd have to get out my .22 and put it down. So, well probably just best not to risk the whole idea of sticking a thermometer up a cats butt.

Wet Q-tips? Cat in heat!? I don't even wanna. No don't wanna know much about that I'm pretty sure.

I was mostly joking about the butt skritching being an UTIA invitation.
Also, I take it you don't watch the venture brothers... which is a damn shame.
There was a scene where Orpheus was explaining that one time he tried to satiate his cat in heat, and that they could look at each other for weeks afterwards because she was a walking constant reminder of their shared shame.


Glad to hear that you were kidding about the uninvited thermometer in the butt thing. (Would have used your UTIA thing, which I think is rather clever. But I'm going for a personal 1 day best at using thermometer, cat and butt. Kinda lost count, but I'm sure I'm closing in on my previous best). So anyway glad you were kidding. Don't think I'd be able to meet your cat without snickering a bit. Also probably make me feel a bit uncomfortable when I went to use your bathroom and saw a thermometer in your medicine cabinet.

Ya, but no. Not really ashame that I don't know much about that Orpheous venture capililist brothers thing. Never had much of an understanding about the whole beasteality thing. I try not to judge others too much. Everybodies got their own thing. And I'm quite sure I have plenty of querks that others don't understand. So, if, ya know, thats your thing OK. I don't get it. Personally I find it a bit disturbing. But that just me. And if I gotta accept you for liking it well, guess its no harm in you accepting that I don't. Seems reasonable to me. So is this a regular show? Must be cable. cause I don't think there is much of a place on regular TV for show based on beastiality.

Yes I know my spelling is way off today I just don't really care. I'm not writting a report for my boss)
 
2012-07-13 08:50:24 AM

logieal: DownDaRiver: Did a GIS for a funny pic of a thermometer up someones butt.

Missed one.


Dude, I saw a whole crap load of them. That's what got me to wondering if there is this whole thing out there I never knew about where people go around sticking thermometers up cats butts.
 
2012-07-13 08:53:39 AM
Oh it certainly wasn't bestiality. Just so you know. According to the show, it was supposed to be a way to get the cat in heat to stop being such a little biatch. As it was explained. Orpheus just held up the q-tip, looked away and let the cat do her thing. He didn't enjoy it, and never did it again.

I just wanted to clarify that there was nothing kinky going on, Orpheus was merely trying to calm down his cat. The venture brothers is a lot of things, but not sick (in that way).
 
2012-07-13 08:55:13 AM
It's not the heat Paul, it's the humidity.
 
2012-07-13 08:56:04 AM

ShannonKW: Unfamiliar metric units may be better than familiar English units if they give us easier numbers.


I use the unit "metric shiat-ton." It works great for both quantity and mass and nearly never requires more than one to completely describe the need.

Others like "shiat-load", as in, "Somebody's got to go back and get a shiat-load of dimes!"

I'm not entirely sure of the conversion factors for shiat-load, shiat-ton, and metric shiat-ton, however.
 
2012-07-13 08:58:36 AM

slykens1: ShannonKW: Unfamiliar metric units may be better than familiar English units if they give us easier numbers.

I use the unit "metric shiat-ton." It works great for both quantity and mass and nearly never requires more than one to completely describe the need.

Others like "shiat-load", as in, "Somebody's got to go back and get a shiat-load of dimes!"

I'm not entirely sure of the conversion factors for shiat-load, shiat-ton, and metric shiat-ton, however.


Roughtly 10 shiat tons per fark load. Depending on the inclination of the Earth and if the Sox are playing a home game.

/Don't even ask about fark tons.
 
2012-07-13 09:01:11 AM

Scruffinator: vossiewulf: Um maybe because we're endothermic with baseline functions constantly generating excess heat? How does this not make sense? We're all comfy somewhere around 70 degrees, that's the temp where the amount of heat you're dumping exactly equals the excess heat you're generating doing normal stuff.

I prefer it to be closer to 60.

/I sound fat


I prefer mid to upper 70s.

/I AM fat
 
2012-07-13 09:02:39 AM

danduran: Entire article is written in Fahrenheit... too much conversion to bother reading....


60 = cool
70 = room temperature
80 = warm
90 = hot
100 = body temperature / hot as fark

You're welcome.
 
2012-07-13 09:04:44 AM

danduran: HotWingAgenda: danduran: Entire article is written in Fahrenheit... too much conversion to bother reading....

That was actually Celsius' attitude towards Fahrenheit, too. The lazy fark invented his own scale from 1 to 100 because he couldn't be arsed to do simple arithmetic. He just arbitrarily made 0 freezing of water and 100 boiling of water.

Works for me. And the rest of the world :p


The only difference is that Fahrenheit put 0 at the temp that salted water freezes and 100 at body temp.
 
2012-07-13 09:05:26 AM

Joshudan: crazydave023: I love running in 100 degree heat. It is intense. But you convince yourself that you cannot be stopped and you will complete your run.

/then again, I am crazy.

I did 2.5 miles in the last 100° day out here and I was easily convinced to stop. Had to walk the 2.5 miles home.

/you crazy! :)


It depends a lot on where you grew up, and what you grew up doing.
I grew up in So Cal, and was/am a mountain biker. Down there, almost all the trails are in chaparral, exposed, dry, open, hot, and shade-less. You get used to it after a while and come to enjoy it (assuming you have enough fluids). In fact there is a ride I used to do that took be from the coast (where my HS was) then home, then I switched bikes, then rode 20 miles to the base of the Saddleback mountains. Then 13 miles to the top along Harding truck trail which is at 5700 feet. Descended Joplin (in the saddle between Modjeska and Santiago peak) which leads you to old camp, and then I descended a single track down to Cooks corner. then back home. It was 70 miles and had 7000' feet of climbing. As long as the temp was under 99 or over 40 it was quite pleasant, even when dealing with a foot of snow.
I acclimated to heat through those rides. Though hands down the nastiest ride I've ever done was in Arizona, riding between Golden shores and Bullhead (iirc) about 20+ miles each way. It was probably 110 when I did it, but it was sort of pleasant. (I had enough water) and there was no one on the road.
Next nastiest was probably racing in Reno in August, that was hell and I started cramping like a mofo before the end.
Worst in the other direction was racing in Upstate new york (at plattekill) in a blizzard. temp was in the 20s there was over a foot of snow onthe ground, and most of the race was held in white out conditions. Beng from So Cal, and only having been at Cal for a couple of months, I had no cold weather gear at all! I wore leg warmers, 2 jerseys and a jacket. That was the most I've ever suffered in a race.

Long story short, hot good, cold bad. ramble on...

Anyways
 
2012-07-13 09:11:44 AM

Mose: ChubbyTiger: Mose: There are so many people who do not grasp even the basics of heat transfer.

This surprises you?

No. But I'm perfectly baffled as to why this section of 10 inch ductil iron water main I have in the lab downstairs fractured, so I needed to write something that I knew was correct for a small victory this morning.

/don't steal my moment, on a Friday no less


Flaw in the iron from casting that fractured due to thermal expansion/contraction stress over a period of time?
 
2012-07-13 09:22:13 AM

Kit Fister: Mose: ChubbyTiger: Mose: There are so many people who do not grasp even the basics of heat transfer.

This surprises you?

No. But I'm perfectly baffled as to why this section of 10 inch ductil iron water main I have in the lab downstairs fractured, so I needed to write something that I knew was correct for a small victory this morning.

/don't steal my moment, on a Friday no less

Flaw in the iron from casting that fractured due to thermal expansion/contraction stress over a period of time?


No inclusions, voids or other irregularities from what I can tell. The main was below frost line and takes water directly from the muni supply for the fire protection system. Section was connected to two straight runs on each end (that were fine, apparently), buried at proper depth (supposedly) with no vehicle traffic above. There may have been the odd rock against it or other stress riser in the area, but these pipes are overbuilt to account for things like that. No pressure surges we know of.

Leaning towards graphitic corrosion since it's about the last card in my hand. Need to get a small sample to put in the XRF. But usually if there's enough graphitization to weaken enough to fracture, it's easy to hear when you clang on it with a wrench or hammer.
 
2012-07-13 09:22:36 AM

logieal: i521.photobucket.com


MOOOOOON RIVERRRRRRR

Usin' the whole hand, doc?

/just relax
 
kab
2012-07-13 09:28:26 AM
I'm miserable in 95 degree weather?

News to me, I guess.
 
2012-07-13 09:29:18 AM

ShannonKW: Boatmech: got to be one of the lamest strawman arguments ever made.

Tons, ounces, and fortnights are English units, but are inconvenient -- even to those well familiar with them -- when they give us awkward numbers to work with.

Unfamiliar metric units may be better than familiar English units if they give us easier numbers.

Celsius may be better than Fahrenheit, even if you are more familiar with the latter. It depends on what you're trying to do.

I'm sorry I confused you.


The argument, though, breaks down when it comes to Celsius versus Fahrenheit. It's not like Fahrenheit is measured in 12s or something. Sure, the gallon/quart/pint/cup thing is stupid as hell. Miles/yards/feet/inches? Dude, why the fark does anyone still use that? But Fahrenheit versus Celsius? The only difference between the two is starting point and Fahrenheit being a smaller unit.
 
2012-07-13 09:31:28 AM
Oh, where should I ramble with this one...

I've been setting my apartment AC to 90 during the day and 80 at night. Now it rarely runs during the day because the walls are actually insulated, and I can stand to sweat it out.

There has been frequent correlation between fat and high amounts of AC. Either it's a coincidence or the body can dump a load of fat in a hurry to beat heat stress. But it is stress, which will drive those able to turn down the AC if able or die if old. I don't think there is anywhere in the USA where you can get a good sized sample of people eating our diet with high temperatures and no AC, so it's hard to study.

One last observation... Crews of Mexican roofers working in 100+ Dallas heat wearing dark sweatshirts. These guys have conquered heat stress and made it their biatch.
 
2012-07-13 09:33:34 AM
The world and everything in it is a great mystery to Slate readers?
 
2012-07-13 09:33:42 AM

meanmutton: The argument, though, breaks down when it comes to Celsius versus Fahrenheit. It's not like Fahrenheit is measured in 12s or something. Sure, the gallon/quart/pint/cup thing is stupid as hell. Miles/yards/feet/inches? Dude, why the fark does anyone still use that? But Fahrenheit versus Celsius? The only difference between the two is starting point and Fahrenheit being a smaller unit.


And the fact that a lot of metric units and formulae are set up to nicely mesh with the Celsius scale. If you're not interested in doing science though, those points aren't an issue.
 
2012-07-13 09:37:21 AM
"wet bulb globe temperature index"

Is it safe to Google 'wet bulb' at work?
 
2012-07-13 09:45:55 AM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy:
I'd say Fahrenheit is perfectly calibrated for the weather. Celsius is the one that has the problem. Why would you use a scale for the weather where 40 degrees is really hot and even temperate areas routinely drop below zero in the winter?


Yep, I completely agree. Fahrenheit is perfect for weather, and it gives you a better 'resolution' on the temps without using decimals.
 
2012-07-13 09:49:26 AM

BurnShrike: meanmutton: The argument, though, breaks down when it comes to Celsius versus Fahrenheit. It's not like Fahrenheit is measured in 12s or something. Sure, the gallon/quart/pint/cup thing is stupid as hell. Miles/yards/feet/inches? Dude, why the fark does anyone still use that? But Fahrenheit versus Celsius? The only difference between the two is starting point and Fahrenheit being a smaller unit.

And the fact that a lot of metric units and formulae are set up to nicely mesh with the Celsius scale. If you're not interested in doing science though, those points aren't an issue.


In the US, scientists and engineers use metric units exclusively when working in a professional setting. No one here suggests that they do otherwise. Side note: all our food products are labeled with metric units, too, and beverages in particular tend to be sold in metric units (liquor and wine in 750 mL bottles, soft drinks in 2L bottles, etc.) except for milk, which still comes in gallon measurements (with the 3.78L slapped on the side of it next to the 1 gallon).

In normal conversation like "what temperature feels comfortable?" or "How hot is it outside?" or "Do I need a coat?" or "Should we turn on the air conditioning?" and stuff like that, what scale you use is irrelevant to everyday life.
 
2012-07-13 10:07:17 AM

meanmutton: BurnShrike: meanmutton: The argument, though, breaks down when it comes to Celsius versus Fahrenheit. It's not like Fahrenheit is measured in 12s or something. Sure, the gallon/quart/pint/cup thing is stupid as hell. Miles/yards/feet/inches? Dude, why the fark does anyone still use that? But Fahrenheit versus Celsius? The only difference between the two is starting point and Fahrenheit being a smaller unit.

And the fact that a lot of metric units and formulae are set up to nicely mesh with the Celsius scale. If you're not interested in doing science though, those points aren't an issue.

In the US, scientists and engineers use metric units exclusively when working in a professional setting. No one here suggests that they do otherwise. Side note: all our food products are labeled with metric units, too, and beverages in particular tend to be sold in metric units (liquor and wine in 750 mL bottles, soft drinks in 2L bottles, etc.) except for milk, which still comes in gallon measurements (with the 3.78L slapped on the side of it next to the 1 gallon).

In normal conversation like "what temperature feels comfortable?" or "How hot is it outside?" or "Do I need a coat?" or "Should we turn on the air conditioning?" and stuff like that, what scale you use is irrelevant to everyday life.


I wouldn't say exclusively. In quantities where legacy units aren't a defining measure somehow, sure. We do all our fire test analysis in Kelvin, kJ, kW, kW/m^2, kg, m/s, etc. But engineers still design buildings in feet and inches. Pipes, fittings, threaded hardware, bulk fluid flow, etc. are often still done in English, even by engineers. Still a lot of engineering design is done in decimated inches, just to make things a bit easier.
 
2012-07-13 10:15:59 AM

meanmutton: BurnShrike: meanmutton: The argument, though, breaks down when it comes to Celsius versus Fahrenheit. It's not like Fahrenheit is measured in 12s or something. Sure, the gallon/quart/pint/cup thing is stupid as hell. Miles/yards/feet/inches? Dude, why the fark does anyone still use that? But Fahrenheit versus Celsius? The only difference between the two is starting point and Fahrenheit being a smaller unit.

And the fact that a lot of metric units and formulae are set up to nicely mesh with the Celsius scale. If you're not interested in doing science though, those points aren't an issue.

In the US, scientists and engineers use metric units exclusively when working in a professional setting. No one here suggests that they do otherwise. Side note: all our food products are labeled with metric units, too, and beverages in particular tend to be sold in metric units (liquor and wine in 750 mL bottles, soft drinks in 2L bottles, etc.) except for milk, which still comes in gallon measurements (with the 3.78L slapped on the side of it next to the 1 gallon).

In normal conversation like "what temperature feels comfortable?" or "How hot is it outside?" or "Do I need a coat?" or "Should we turn on the air conditioning?" and stuff like that, what scale you use is irrelevant to everyday life.


I think you would be surprised that a lot of engineers in the United States do not actually use metric units that frequently. When I got out of college and into rocket science there was a rude awakening for me in that respect. Nearly everything is in English units, and that even changes some of your working equations because you have to take the whole gravity constant into effect that is mostly normalized out in metric units. You wanna know why it was even possible for that Mars lander to have a bad unit conversion cause it to crash, that is the root cause.

In my experience, scientists and students use metric, but when you actually have to build something and make it work, you end up using English units in America. (All the components and machining and measurement devices are in English so its better to work in it natively than risk a unit conversion screwing you)
 
2012-07-13 10:19:10 AM
I once read that once the outside heat exceeds the body's temperature, we're less bothered by it. So 96 degrees feels hotter than 100 degrees.
 
2012-07-13 10:21:22 AM

sircedric4: meanmutton: BurnShrike: meanmutton: The argument, though, breaks down when it comes to Celsius versus Fahrenheit. It's not like Fahrenheit is measured in 12s or something. Sure, the gallon/quart/pint/cup thing is stupid as hell. Miles/yards/feet/inches? Dude, why the fark does anyone still use that? But Fahrenheit versus Celsius? The only difference between the two is starting point and Fahrenheit being a smaller unit.

And the fact that a lot of metric units and formulae are set up to nicely mesh with the Celsius scale. If you're not interested in doing science though, those points aren't an issue.

In the US, scientists and engineers use metric units exclusively when working in a professional setting. No one here suggests that they do otherwise. Side note: all our food products are labeled with metric units, too, and beverages in particular tend to be sold in metric units (liquor and wine in 750 mL bottles, soft drinks in 2L bottles, etc.) except for milk, which still comes in gallon measurements (with the 3.78L slapped on the side of it next to the 1 gallon).

In normal conversation like "what temperature feels comfortable?" or "How hot is it outside?" or "Do I need a coat?" or "Should we turn on the air conditioning?" and stuff like that, what scale you use is irrelevant to everyday life.

I think you would be surprised that a lot of engineers in the United States do not actually use metric units that frequently. When I got out of college and into rocket science there was a rude awakening for me in that respect. Nearly everything is in English units, and that even changes some of your working equations because you have to take the whole gravity constant into effect that is mostly normalized out in metric units. You wanna know why it was even possible for that Mars lander to have a bad unit conversion cause it to crash, that is the root cause.

In my experience, scientists and students use metric, but when you actually have to build something and make it work, ...


It's not our fault the stuipd machinists can only think in thousandths of an inch.

/just kidding machinists... please continue milling that bracket for me?
 
2012-07-13 10:28:14 AM

vossiewulf: We're all comfy somewhere around 70 degrees


76 with an oscillating fan on is my jam.
 
2012-07-13 10:29:21 AM

Mose: It's not our fault the stuipd machinists can only think in thousandths of an inch.

/just kidding machinists... please continue milling that bracket for me?



Pretty much hit it on the head. 100 years worth of milling machines and lathes are in thousandths of an inch, and a lot of those old work horses are still around. And like you mentioned with the plumbing, threaded hardware and all, its just simple inertia and having already gone so far down this path that not using English units is not cost effective in America.

In Europe, most of their machines and plumbing was made in SI units to begin with, so it makes sense for their engineers to do the work in SI.
 
2012-07-13 11:07:51 AM
Anytime it's hot enough that I can work up a sweat standing or sitting still I say fark you outdoors.
 
2012-07-13 11:08:24 AM
So glad we have Slate to explain that which we all learned in the 5th grade.
 
2012-07-13 11:44:05 AM

danduran: HotWingAgenda: danduran: Entire article is written in Fahrenheit... too much conversion to bother reading....

That was actually Celsius' attitude towards Fahrenheit, too. The lazy fark invented his own scale from 1 to 100 because he couldn't be arsed to do simple arithmetic. He just arbitrarily made 0 freezing of water and 100 boiling of water.

Works for me. And the rest of the world :p


Fahrenheit is better for talking about human comfort because it's finer grained. You have to get into the first decimal place to get the same gradations from celsius.

\CSS: One of my husband's old cars has a Celsius thermostat dial, and the range marked on it is 10-30, as if anyone would want their car to be either 10ºC or 30ºC.
 
2012-07-13 11:54:31 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: It's really tough to pull down 5K cal/day, every day and without junk food or fast food. It's a hell of a lot of food. It takes a lot of time to cook and a lot of time to eat, and frankly it's a pain in the ass. Especially since whatever you are doing that requires such consumption levels is almost certain to leave you exhausted to the point that you don't want to cook or eat.


I believe the traditional winter backpacking solution is lots of things like summer sausage and cheese that are high cal and ready to eat. Snarf some of that on the trail and while you melt the snow for a dehydrated warm meal and you'll rack up some calories,
 
2012-07-13 11:56:14 AM
Really Farkers...a thread on body heat and not one pic of a hot body...
 
2012-07-13 11:59:35 AM

Sultan Of Herf: Really Farkers...a thread on body heat and not one pic of a hot body...


Sorry. Here you go.

i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2012-07-13 12:42:34 PM
the human body operates most efficiently when the air temperature is about 70 degrees

Anything below 80 and I feel slightly chilly, 70 is just plain cold to me.

Could it be that people from different parts of the world (Say a tropical island that's 85 year round) have different temperatures that their bodies are efficient at.

At 75 degrees, take off jacket
At 80 degrees, ok, I don't need a T-Shirt under my polo anymore
At 85 degrees, now I can wear shorts instead of jeans, maybe
At 90 degrees, chillin in the shade
At 95 degrees, ok ok, let's turn on the AC
At 100 degrees, everybody's gonna strip, and jump in the pool.
At >100 degrees, an' what, wait a minute, wait a minute Don't take your clothes off yet, not yet Wait 'til we get home
 
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