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(Fox News)   Fox news: 2004 murder scene DNA linked to Occupy Wall Street subway vandalism. Article: there is no immediate evidence that the DNA belongs to one of the OWS protestors who chained open the gates   (foxnews.com ) divider line
    More: Fail, Occupy Wall Street, DNA, NBC 4 New York, murder scene, emergency exits, DNA linked, Juilliard  
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3048 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jul 2012 at 9:18 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-11 09:21:36 AM  
6 votes:
OWS is obviously innocent, as murdering someone would involve actual accomplishment.
2012-07-11 09:30:04 AM  
2 votes:

Moosecakes: To be fair, even NPR news reported it this way


That doesn't matter! Just whine and howl and gnash your teeth about Fox.
2012-07-11 08:58:24 AM  
2 votes:
Subby, I'm assuming you have no experience in law enforcement, so I'll try to explain this to you. In a crime investigation, "immediate" evidence refers to evidence that is insubstantial, fleeting and swift. Evidence that, like a fleet-footed rabbit, scampers out in front of you, twitches its ears in a what seems to be a promising invite, and then, just as you begin to approach it with your hand out and your heart open, vanishes like a brown lightning flash into the twisted thicket. It is evidence, in short, that seems promising at first but ultimately does not pan out. A crime scene investigator does not want "immediate" evidence. He wants "solid" evidence. "Stable" evidence. "Long-term evidence with a stamina and lasting power." He wants to feel the evidence in his hands, firm yet malleable. Hot -- yes, even pulsing -- with possibility. He wants to attack that evidence from every angle, to turn it on its head and penetrate it as deeply as he can, penetrate all the way to its very center because he knows that only then will it yield its bountiful clues up to him, time and time and time again, until finally, exhausted from the effort, he's able to set it aside, utterly drained, and turn his mind finally to the hunt for the next invaluable lead. No immediate evidence? That's a good thing, a very good thing.
2012-07-11 03:03:16 PM  
1 vote:

halfof33: protip: No one cares about OWS anymore


You do.

How is your boyfriend Julian doing?
2012-07-11 09:31:00 AM  
1 vote:

Pocket Ninja: Subby, I'm assuming you have no experience in law enforcement, so I'll try to explain this to you. In a crime investigation, "immediate" evidence refers to evidence that is insubstantial, fleeting and swift. Evidence that, like a fleet-footed rabbit, scampers out in front of you, twitches its ears in a what seems to be a promising invite, and then, just as you begin to approach it with your hand out and your heart open, vanishes like a brown lightning flash into the twisted thicket. It is evidence, in short, that seems promising at first but ultimately does not pan out. A crime scene investigator does not want "immediate" evidence. He wants "solid" evidence. "Stable" evidence. "Long-term evidence with a stamina and lasting power." He wants to feel the evidence in his hands, firm yet malleable. Hot -- yes, even pulsing -- with possibility. He wants to attack that evidence from every angle, to turn it on its head and penetrate it as deeply as he can, penetrate all the way to its very center because he knows that only then will it yield its bountiful clues up to him, time and time and time again, until finally, exhausted from the effort, he's able to set it aside, utterly drained, and turn his mind finally to the hunt for the next invaluable lead. No immediate evidence? That's a good thing, a very good thing.


I'll be in my bunk.
 
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