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(MSNBC)   NYC mayor challenges builders to see how small of a craphole people would be willing to live in just for the privilege of living in NYC   (bottomline.msnbc.msn.com) divider line 119
    More: Dumbass, nyc mayor, privileges  
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8627 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jul 2012 at 4:18 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-10 01:31:10 AM  
pass
 
2012-07-10 02:24:34 AM  
Corbin Dallas would rent one.
 
2012-07-10 02:32:15 AM  
Good. Let NYC lead the country in jamming everybody into a small space. We need guinea pigs. Plenty of Guinea's in NYC.
 
2012-07-10 02:34:26 AM  

jaylectricity: Plenty of Guinea's in NYC.


You need a wop along side the head!
 
2012-07-10 04:20:41 AM  

robmilmel: jaylectricity: Plenty of Guinea's in NYC.

You need a wop along side the head!


Why did ya have dago there?
 
2012-07-10 04:31:09 AM  
Pizza thread?
 
2012-07-10 04:36:16 AM  
After he has lived in one of these boxes for a couple of years (and then continues to do so because he likes it), only then I would be comfortable with such a person making a suggestion like this.

Why not go all the way and make those single bed tubes they have in some Japanese airport hotels?

Actually I changed my mind, make some of those types of hotels and allow the homeless to claim one and live in it.
 
2012-07-10 04:40:05 AM  

Langdon_777: After he has lived in one of these boxes for a couple of years (and then continues to do so because he likes it), only then I would be comfortable with such a person making a suggestion like this.

Why not go all the way and make those single bed tubes they have in some Japanese airport hotels?

Actually I changed my mind, make some of those types of hotels and allow the homeless to claim one and live in it.


Yeah, and those wouldn't be hives of scum and villainy. The idea of jamming tons of people into their own coffin-like spaces to live sickens me. People will go nuts with such a small amount of breathing room and absolutely zero privacy, crime will skyrocket.

/referring to your joke scenario
//and to tiny ass apartments becoming the new norm in NYC.
 
2012-07-10 04:45:57 AM  
But hey, it'll probably only cost $1500/mo to rent one, so at least they're probably going to be really inexpensive.
 
2012-07-10 04:46:36 AM  
If NY is going to compete with Tokyo they're *really* going to have to step up their game.
 
2012-07-10 04:49:51 AM  
New slogan:

Live in NYC. It's like being in prison!
 
2012-07-10 04:50:19 AM  
 
2012-07-10 04:51:36 AM  

Jaws_Victim: People will go nuts with such a small amount of breathing room and absolutely zero privacy, crime will skyrocket.


And yet the crime rate in Hong Kong is minuscule compared to American cities.
 
2012-07-10 04:54:15 AM  
In every city I've lived in there has been few small cheap places to live in that you won't be found dead in within the month. Apartment buildings with small units for singles would be nice. If there were more places like that maybe people can start moving out of their parents basements. Small spaces cost less to heat/cool.

/dont live in the basement
//too many spiders
 
2012-07-10 04:56:22 AM  

cretinbob: pass



*This*
 
2012-07-10 04:57:48 AM  

BafflerMeal: A Tiny Apartment Transforms into 24 Rooms


If he puts all of those CDs on his "phone" he can double his space.
/his kitchen is bigger than mine.
 
2012-07-10 05:01:39 AM  

0Icky0: Jaws_Victim: People will go nuts with such a small amount of breathing room and absolutely zero privacy, crime will skyrocket.

And yet the crime rate in Hong Kong is minuscule compared to American cities.


The actual crime rate, or the reported crime rate?

/I hear you can buy your way out of trouble in Hong Kong
 
2012-07-10 05:02:12 AM  
San te Million Meguro Toyama

A one room apartment with kitchen
A steal at 14,500,000yen

A whopping 18.36 square meters of living space
A huge 3.41 square meter balcony

Only an 8 minute walk to Ikejiri station
and a convenient 19 minute walk to Shibuya station

Buy it today!
 
2012-07-10 05:10:14 AM  

untaken_name: The actual crime rate, or the reported crime rate?

/I hear you can buy your way out of trouble in Hong Kong


Actual.
You can buy your way out in China if you don't go too far. And white-collar..probably the same as most places. But violent crime? We had 12 homicides last year in a city the size of Chicago - and Chicago was in the news because they went one single day without a homicide.
 
2012-07-10 05:21:37 AM  

BafflerMeal: I'm ok with this.

A Tiny Apartment Transforms into 24 Rooms


I'd like some aspects of this. Put this idea into a two bedroom apartment that has more space than that tiny hole and I'd be sold. For instance an office room that can transform into a spare bedroom without the use of a futon. Or the ability to "knock out" the wall between the kitchen and living room to expand that space. or the opposite when you want to watch tv or a movie. Or the ability to convert most of the living room into a decent dining space (which most apartments lack).

The problem with such super tiny spaces is that you ALWAYS have to be tidy. I like tidy, but sometimes I'm working on a project and don't want to put everything away just to boil some water.
 
2012-07-10 05:23:13 AM  

0Icky0: untaken_name: The actual crime rate, or the reported crime rate?

/I hear you can buy your way out of trouble in Hong Kong

Actual.
You can buy your way out in China if you don't go too far. And white-collar..probably the same as most places. But violent crime? We had 12 homicides last year in a city the size of Chicago - and Chicago was in the news because they went one single day without a homicide.


That's impressive.

/not snarking, that's seriously cool.
 
2012-07-10 05:25:02 AM  

0Icky0: BafflerMeal: A Tiny Apartment Transforms into 24 Rooms

If he puts all of those CDs on his "phone" he can double his space.
/his kitchen is bigger than mine.


That's what I was thinking, a small NAS server could hold all his movies and music and is the size of a toaster. He might be able to fit a pool table in with that stuff gone.
 
2012-07-10 05:31:06 AM  

untaken_name: That's impressive.
/not snarking, that's seriously cool.


I grew up (outside Chicago) knowing without a doubt that cities are dangerous places because of all the people crowded together in an unnatural state.
But life in Hong Kong has taught me that it isn't the crowding that's the problem. It's something else that makes American cities dangerous.
 
2012-07-10 05:34:59 AM  

0Icky0: It's something else that makes American cities dangerous.


Well, I'll say it. It's because most Americans are farking selfish assholes.
 
2012-07-10 05:35:08 AM  

pedobearapproved: BafflerMeal: I'm ok with this.

A Tiny Apartment Transforms into 24 Rooms

I'd like some aspects of this. Put this idea into a two bedroom apartment that has more space than that tiny hole and I'd be sold. For instance an office room that can transform into a spare bedroom without the use of a futon. Or the ability to "knock out" the wall between the kitchen and living room to expand that space. or the opposite when you want to watch tv or a movie. Or the ability to convert most of the living room into a decent dining space (which most apartments lack).

The problem with such super tiny spaces is that you ALWAYS have to be tidy. I like tidy, but sometimes I'm working on a project and don't want to put everything away just to boil some water.


My friends' house is designed this way. They have a Murphy Bed with a table on the backside, so they can flip down the bed or table for like four people.They also installed folding doors, so that if a visitor is using the Murphy Bed, they can transform the space into a guest room. There are bookcases/storage on both sides for chairs/pillows/linens.

It would be nice to see these kinds of technologies built into an apartment, but I don't exactly have money to buy a Murphy Bed system burning a hole in my wallet. As for TV's, I really think projection screens are much more efficient that anything that could mount to a wall. Seems like someone could bump the quality if that's an issue.

But yes, I agree on having to be very very tidy in in such small spaces, which makes me nuts because I'm forever leaving things out for the next day or whatever.
 
2012-07-10 05:36:45 AM  

0Icky0: It's something else that makes American cities dangerous.


It's all the Americans.
 
2012-07-10 05:39:55 AM  
getting a kick....
 
2012-07-10 05:51:27 AM  
They're already doing this with micro-homes in my area. The Division 43 site in Southeast Portland has units from 364-687 square feet.
 
2012-07-10 06:05:38 AM  

0Icky0: I grew up (outside Chicago) knowing without a doubt that cities are dangerous places because of all the people crowded together in an unnatural state.
But life in Hong Kong has taught me that it isn't the crowding that's the problem. It's something else that makes American cities dangerous.


I hope you don't go to a Latin American city, South Africa or even some places in Europe.

LOL at an American thinking his cities are dangerous.
 
2012-07-10 06:09:23 AM  
Headline has a typo.

NYC mayor challenges builders to see how small of a craphole people would be willing to live in just for the privilege of TELLING OTHERS they live in NYC.
 
2012-07-10 06:21:24 AM  

rocky_howard: LOL at an American thinking his cities are dangerous.


I dunno man, I'd say the people in Detroit are entitled to that belief.
 
2012-07-10 06:23:11 AM  

Gawdzila: rocky_howard: LOL at an American thinking his cities are dangerous.

I dunno man, I'd say the people in Detroit are entitled to that belief.


Are there any people left in Detroit?
 
2012-07-10 06:24:21 AM  
People from all over the world want to live in New York City,

Not to mention the New Yorkers who waste over an hour getting into Manhattan
 
2012-07-10 06:28:26 AM  

0Icky0: Jaws_Victim: People will go nuts with such a small amount of breathing room and absolutely zero privacy, crime will skyrocket.

And yet the crime rate in Hong Kong is minuscule compared to American cities.


You know who else has a relatively low crime rate? New York City. Not compared to Hong Kong maybe, but it's doing pretty okay. Oh and you know what contributes to crimes? Homelessness.

Seriously, if you're going to make housing cheaper in more parts of the city, that should be better for most of its citizens. This may be one of the few decent ideas he's had as mayor.
 
2012-07-10 06:31:13 AM  
"You were lucky to find this place," Rossiter, the most regular visitor, never tired of telling him. He reclined back on the bed, gesturing at the cubicle. "It's enormous, the perspectives really zoom. I'd be surprised if you haven't got at least five metres here, perhaps six."Ward shook his head categorically. Rossiter was his closest friend, but the quest for living space had forged powerful reflexes. "Just over four and a half, I've measured it carefully. There's no doubt about it."Rossiter lifted one eyebrow. "I'm amazed. It must be the ceiling then."Manipulating the ceiling was a favourite trick of unscrupulous landlords-most assessments of area were made upon the ceiling, out of convenience, and by tilting back the plywood partitions the rated area of a cubicle could be either increased, for the benefit of a prospective tenant (many married couples were thus bamboozled into taking a single cubicle), or decreased temporarily on the visits of the housing inspectors. Ceilings were criss-crossed with pencil marks staking out the rival claims of tenants on opposite sides of a party wall. Someone timid of his rights could be literally squeezed out of existence-in fact, the advertisement "quiet clientele" was usually a tacit invitation to this sort of piracy.

"The wall does tilt a little," Ward admitted. "Actually, it's about four degrees out-I used aplumb-line. But there's still plenty of room on the stairs for people to get by."

Rossiter grinned. "Of course, John. I'm just envious, that's all. My room is driving me crazy." Like everyone, he used the term "room" to describe his tiny cubicle, a hangover from the days fifty years earlier when people had indeed lived one to a room, sometimes, unbelievably, one to an apartment or house. The microfilms in the architecture catalogues at the library showed scenes of museums, concert halls and other public buildings in what appeared to be everyday settings, often virtually empty, two or three people wandering down an enormous gallery or staircase. Traffic moved freely along the centre of streets, and in the quieter districts sections of sidewalk would be deserted for fifty yards or more.

Now, of course, the older buildings had been torn down and replaced by housing batteries, or converted into apartment blocks. The great banqueting room in the former City Hall had been split horizontally into four decks, each of these cut up into hundreds of cubicles.

...

"I hear they may reduce the allocation to three and a half metres," Rossiter remarked.Ward paused to allow a party of tenants from the sixth floor to pass down the staircase, holding the door to prevent it jumping off its latch. "So they're always saying," he commented. "I can remember that rumour ten years ago."

"It's no rumour," Rossiter warned him. "It may well be necessary soon. Thirty million people are packed into this city now, a million increase in just one year. There's been some pretty serious talk at the Housing Department."

Ward shook his head. "A drastic revaluation like that is almost impossible to carry out. Every single partition would have to be dismantled and nailed up again, the administrative job alone is so vast it's difficult to visualize. Millions of cubicles to be redesigned and certified, licences to be issued, plus the complete resettlement of every tenant. Most of the buildings put up since the last revaluation are designed around a four-metre modulus-you can't simply take half a metre off the end of each cubicle and then say that makes so many new cubicles. They may be only six inches wide." He laughed. "Besides, how can you live in just three and a half metres?"
 
2012-07-10 07:01:21 AM  
As a New Yorker, I think this is a great idea:

1) There is so much to do in the city that you're doing something wrong if you're sitting around your apartment thinking about how small it is.

1a) Location and subway access are way more important than apartment size.

2) Most studios are horribly inefficiently laid out. These places will probably end up feeling more spacious than studios nearly twice the size.
 
2012-07-10 07:09:26 AM  
I wouldn't live in New York if a 3000sqft place was $50 a month.
 
2012-07-10 07:11:53 AM  
I think that if you build it from the start with a small size in mind you can pack quite a bit of living into a small space. Think of it like living on a boat, and keep in mind that boats waste quite a bit of living space due to the hull shape, granted that space is used for storage in many cases but usually it's fairly awkward to get to the stuff in the locker or whatever due to the odd shapes they have to fit into.

I have spent a few years living in spaces that would make 375 square feet look like heaven and it was liveable for the most part, granted we didn't have to pack in a kitchen and bathroom into it but it could be done as long as a lot of forethought went into it and it was built that way from the ground up. I would add a bit of secure storage space somewhere off the beaten path in the same building for out of season clothing or whatever but that wouldn't have to be all that large to work for most people.

Where the problems come up is when you try to make 10 apartments out of a structure originally meant for 2 or 3 apartments. Plumbing and electricity is shoehorned into places where it was never intended to be, structural supports end up smack dab in the middle of rooms and other crappy living situations will almost always end up happening when you do that.

With that being said that type of living arrangement is not suited for some types of people. If you're a shut in type, a hoarder in training or a lard assed fatty then you probably should realize that this type of place wouldn't be for you.
 
2012-07-10 07:15:07 AM  
I am starting to feel guilty, now. Four bedroom, 2 bathroom house on 7 acres. 25 minute scenic drive to work though the country, with one stoplight. $130K in 2004. Lived in a 200 sf camper for 4 months, before we bought the house. No thanks. Getting a kick, etc.
 
2012-07-10 07:16:11 AM  
"NYC smells like pee and the people are rude."
 
2012-07-10 07:25:58 AM  

0Icky0: untaken_name: The actual crime rate, or the reported crime rate?

/I hear you can buy your way out of trouble in Hong Kong

Actual.
You can buy your way out in China if you don't go too far. And white-collar..probably the same as most places. But violent crime? We had 12 homicides last year in a city the size of Chicago - and Chicago was in the news because they went one single day without a homicide.


I'm curious...how confident are you in the accuracy of the reported crime stats? Is the press free, free-ish? do they massage those stats?

NYC did for awhile, with the interesting result that, since people THOUGHT the streets were safer, the streets eventually BECAME safer, since more people would go out instead of huddling in their apartments.
 
2012-07-10 07:28:27 AM  

paraigmshift: "NYC smells like pee and the people are rude."


Ever been?

Worst that's ever happened to me in NYC over numerous visits is slow service.

Rudest Americans I've EVER met were tourists from Ohio in Boston. The SWUBA made me ashamed to share nationality with 'em.
 
2012-07-10 07:33:56 AM  

thornhill: As a New Yorker, I think this is a great idea:

1) There is so much to do in the city that you're doing something wrong if you're sitting around your apartment thinking about how small it is.

1a) Location and subway access are way more important than apartment size.

2) Most studios are horribly inefficiently laid out. These places will probably end up feeling more spacious than studios nearly twice the size.


Agreed, college grads will be all over this. 20 years ago I knew someone who lived in a studio so narrow that you could almost touch either wall when you spread your hands. But it was in a great neighborhood, close to the subway, and he was paying $600/mo. As far as he was concerned he discovered plutonium. It would still be a steal at twice the price today.
 
2012-07-10 07:34:39 AM  
FTFA: One couple paid $150,000 for a 175-square-foot (16-square-meter) studio in Manhattan in 2009

I wonder who got the place in the divorce settlement.
 
2012-07-10 07:34:56 AM  
Christopher Lowell did this years ago on his tv show. Took a studio apt the size of an average bedroom and divied up the space into little "rooms".

It looked pretty cool. He had a den, living area, sleeping area, ect.

Just takes a little imagination.
 
2012-07-10 07:38:28 AM  

Discordulator: robmilmel: jaylectricity: Plenty of Guinea's in NYC.

You need a wop along side the head!

Why did ya have dago there?


53.img.v4.skyrock.net
Frowns on your racist puns.
 
2012-07-10 07:42:51 AM  
My first place in NY was 12 x 16 plus a tiny bathroom. There are actually smaller places in the building. It's actually doable if you plan right and go vertical (really tall shelves). The biggest pain for me was that I like to cook and needed more space for food/gadgets/kitchen stuff.

Even in a 2,000 sf house I spent most of my time in 2-3 spots.
 
2012-07-10 07:43:30 AM  

paraigmshift: "NYC smells like pee and the people are rude."


Whatever. I bet he hasn't been there in like 100 years.
 
2012-07-10 07:45:15 AM  

PunGent: paraigmshift: "NYC smells like pee and the people are rude."

Ever been?

Worst that's ever happened to me in NYC over numerous visits is slow service.

Rudest Americans I've EVER met were tourists from Ohio in Boston. The SWUBA made me ashamed to share nationality with 'em.


I have, actually. Three times. Once for a music thing so I didnt get out of rehearsal much, but everyone there seemed to have a holier than thou sense of entitlement. Like living in NYC meant that they were different than everyone else somehow.....different from everyone else living in NYC, and heaven forbid you wait for a cross signal. I just felt like if you moved there, you would have to be an angry, self righteous farktard. Now, this doesn't mean that everyone there may be that way or that it is the rudest city out there. Just my experience......and I laughed at that quote when I heard it on True Blood this week.

/just sayin
 
2012-07-10 07:51:57 AM  
And by NYC, they mean Manhattan, and select areas of Queens and Brooklyn that are close to Manhattan.
 
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