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(Washington Post)   Pepco would like its hundreds of thousands of customers who recently went without power for a week or more to know it thinks it did really super well in responding to outages this time and you're welcome   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 100
    More: Followup, Pepco, sun outage, customer satisfaction  
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6926 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jul 2012 at 4:59 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-09 03:49:22 PM  
"This was a regional event, a severe weather event," she said. "We are gonna have to let the process play out. I am comfortable that we will be able to demonstrate that our performance, considering the event" - and then a slight pause- "that we performed well considering the severity of the event."

If you're the customer advocate, the customer spokesperson shouldn't you be saying things like "I am comfortable that THEY will be able to demonstrate that THEIR performance...that THEY performed well considering the severity of the event"?

If you don't, if you makes one wonder who you're advocating for.

OK. Sure. But you should at least try to create the illusion that you're not just another one in a long line of typical company spokespersons.
 
2012-07-09 04:06:34 PM  
I don't doubt that Pepco did as well as it possibly could under the circumstances.

But Pepco's best is farking terrible.
 
2012-07-09 04:33:59 PM  

FishyFred: I don't doubt that Pepco did as well as it possibly could under the circumstances.

But Pepco's best is farking terrible.


My power was out for three days. Here's my take:

1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

2.) The douchebags at Pepco central who've decided that regular tree trimming and lack of underground power lines are a way to run the company should be horsewhipped
 
2012-07-09 04:58:31 PM  
You can't say the extent of damage was unforeseen when you cut all the maintenance and stop removing all obstacles that are likely to fall onto the power lines during a storm. That's entirely foreseeable and a direct product of the company's negligence and malfeasance.

Also that advocate position needs to be re-worded, it's the companies advocate to the customer. I like how the company hires a cheerleader for the company then declares that cheerleader to represent the customers and since the cheerleader is cheering for the company ergo the customers must be extremely happy and proud of the company's response!
 
2012-07-09 05:03:27 PM  
Pepco had Florida Power help out so the process took twice as long

\\has Florida Power and the electric goes out at least once a month
 
2012-07-09 05:03:43 PM  

AzDownboy: FishyFred: I don't doubt that Pepco did as well as it possibly could under the circumstances.

But Pepco's best is farking terrible.

My power was out for three days. Here's my take:

1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

2.) The douchebags at Pepco central who've decided that regular tree trimming and lack of underground power lines are a way to run the company should be horsewhipped


Rerouting lines underground is prohibitively expensive, astronomically expensive to be more exact.
 
2012-07-09 05:07:12 PM  
I think what's important in this whole Pepco ordeal is the establishment that companies will short the hell out of everyone if at all possible, even if the shiat hits the fan like this case they wont suffer for it, and they will continue to carry on like this as business as usual. There is nothing to see here, people. A large corporation squeezed as much as they could from their base to enrich their top, while neglecting the infrastructure that makes them money. This is standard business operation model now. About the only thing that Pepco can't do is cry and take their ball to another country when they get called on the carpet to quit being scumbags.
 
2012-07-09 05:09:30 PM  

AzDownboy: 1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect


Look, if I was a field commander and I threw 50 light infantrymen in a daylight charge over a minefield against a division of tanks backed by close air support, I don't think the historians will care how hard they fought, "at all hours in terrible heat" or otherwise.

PEPCO doesn't get a passing grade for effort because they overworked their rank & file. They deliberately understaffed their disaster response team and you think they deserve a gold star for that?
 
2012-07-09 05:09:49 PM  
The beautiful sound of de-regulated monopoly! Isn't it nice that basic services are run by profit-seeking corporations?
 
2012-07-09 05:09:50 PM  
What they mean is, you should be glad the power came back on at all.
 
2012-07-09 05:12:47 PM  
.....we performed well
Everyone cares about our customers. They care deeply.


B*tch is on crack....possibly mixed with bath salts.

People not in this area don't even know how badly PEPCO f*cked up. People would get robocalls saying "Your power is now on" when it wasn't on. When the people called to get a live person to tell them it's not on, the PEPCO person would argue with them saying it's on. PEPCO also has an app that people used...that failed miserably. Also telling people their power was back on when it wasn't. PEPCO turned power back on to live wires hanging onto a house and ground. They are beyond incompetent and definitely did NOT perform well. They performed like the Three Stooges, but not as funny.
 
2012-07-09 05:13:06 PM  
Mikey's comments to the original article are quite entertaining. What a loser.
 
2012-07-09 05:13:59 PM  
Pepco has announced the hiring of another consumer advocate. He has many years experience of serving the public.
www.welovetheiraqiinformationminister.com
 
2012-07-09 05:15:04 PM  

dragonchild: AzDownboy: 1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

Look, if I was a field commander and I threw 50 light infantrymen in a daylight charge over a minefield against a division of tanks backed by close air support, I don't think the historians will care how hard they fought, "at all hours in terrible heat" or otherwise.

PEPCO doesn't get a passing grade for effort because they overworked their rank & file. They deliberately understaffed their disaster response team and you think they deserve a gold star for that?


I thought he was giving props to the work crews rather than the team-leaders back at base or the entire corporation.

However, your point is also valid.
 
2012-07-09 05:15:16 PM  

dragonchild: AzDownboy: 1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

Look, if I was a field commander and I threw 50 light infantrymen in a daylight charge over a minefield against a division of tanks backed by close air support, I don't think the historians will care how hard they fought, "at all hours in terrible heat" or otherwise.

PEPCO doesn't get a passing grade for effort because they overworked their rank & file. They deliberately understaffed their disaster response team and you think they deserve a gold star for that?



I think he is talking about the local work crews getting thanks, not their middle or upper management that understaffed them and worked them to death.
 
2012-07-09 05:17:41 PM  

dragonchild: AzDownboy: 1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

Look, if I was a field commander and I threw 50 light infantrymen in a daylight charge over a minefield against a division of tanks backed by close air support, I don't think the historians will care how hard they fought, "at all hours in terrible heat" or otherwise.

PEPCO doesn't get a passing grade for effort because they overworked their rank & file. They deliberately understaffed their disaster response team and you think they deserve a gold star for that?


Shouldn't both the line crews and your 50 infantrymen get gold stars for doing a hard job in rotten conditions?

None of that speaks to either PEPCO's management or your ability to command.
 
2012-07-09 05:18:09 PM  

max_pooper: AzDownboy: FishyFred: I don't doubt that Pepco did as well as it possibly could under the circumstances.

But Pepco's best is farking terrible.

My power was out for three days. Here's my take:

1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

2.) The douchebags at Pepco central who've decided that regular tree trimming and lack of underground power lines are a way to run the company should be horsewhipped

Rerouting lines underground is prohibitively expensive, astronomically expensive to be more exact.


Pepco central can suck a thousand cocks. I was out of power for two days, and I had friends out for much longer. But yeah, the crews themselves are pretty awesome, especially those guys who came from far away states to give us a hand.

As for rerouting power lines, the District city council considered simply allowing Pepco to bury lines when roadwork was already being done, thus allivating much of the cost. Pepco nixed the idea.
 
2012-07-09 05:18:54 PM  
Verizon farked me over for 6.5 days. No internet (BOOHOO) but that is how I get files to print. I am a struggling business and it was farked up. The verizon call center is in Costa rica. Holding times were from 1.5 hrs to 10 minutes Bastards lied all the time. It was not the stress of losing power but, something is wrong. If verizons infrastructure is so vulnerable, they need new management.

/incoherent anger placed here.

//eastern shore of MD with a 410-820-````` phone line.
 
2012-07-09 05:22:12 PM  

steve20832: Pepco had Florida Power help out so the process took twice as long

\\has Florida Power and the electric goes out at least once a month


I had so called "Florida Flicker and Flash" when we lived in Port Charlotte. Lights never went out, even during the regular lightning storms.

Then we moved into Lee County Electric Cooperative service area and we've had 4 multi-hour outages (they they pointed fingers at FPL over) plus flickers and flashes during the storms. Their rates are 10% higher than FPL and their customer service is pretty much "If you don't like the service, go with the other power company. Ohwait......."
 
2012-07-09 05:23:10 PM  
And I wish WashPost would harass metro half as much as they are doing Pepco.....

/Only lost power for a very short time - so I was lucky.
 
2012-07-09 05:26:15 PM  

Gyrfalcon: dragonchild: AzDownboy: 1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

Look, if I was a field commander and I threw 50 light infantrymen in a daylight charge over a minefield against a division of tanks backed by close air support, I don't think the historians will care how hard they fought, "at all hours in terrible heat" or otherwise.

PEPCO doesn't get a passing grade for effort because they overworked their rank & file. They deliberately understaffed their disaster response team and you think they deserve a gold star for that?

Shouldn't both the line crews and your 50 infantrymen get gold stars for doing a hard job in rotten conditions?

None of that speaks to either PEPCO's management or your ability to command.


Only if Lord Tennyson happens to hear of it.
 
2012-07-09 05:27:03 PM  

Gyrfalcon: dragonchild: AzDownboy: 1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

Look, if I was a field commander and I threw 50 light infantrymen in a daylight charge over a minefield against a division of tanks backed by close air support, I don't think the historians will care how hard they fought, "at all hours in terrible heat" or otherwise.

PEPCO doesn't get a passing grade for effort because they overworked their rank & file. They deliberately understaffed their disaster response team and you think they deserve a gold star for that?

Shouldn't both the line crews and your 50 infantrymen get gold stars for doing a hard job in rotten conditions?

None of that speaks to either PEPCO's management or your ability to command do the reading comprehension.

 
2012-07-09 05:29:01 PM  
Obligatory, video link posted earlier this week for those that missed it. NSFW language.
 
2012-07-09 05:29:10 PM  

nelsonal: Gyrfalcon: dragonchild: AzDownboy: 1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

Look, if I was a field commander and I threw 50 light infantrymen in a daylight charge over a minefield against a division of tanks backed by close air support, I don't think the historians will care how hard they fought, "at all hours in terrible heat" or otherwise.

PEPCO doesn't get a passing grade for effort because they overworked their rank & file. They deliberately understaffed their disaster response team and you think they deserve a gold star for that?

Shouldn't both the line crews and your 50 infantrymen get gold stars for doing a hard job in rotten conditions?

None of that speaks to either PEPCO's management or your ability to command.

Only if Lord Tennyson happens to hear of it.


More like The Charge of the No Lights Brigade, right??
 
2012-07-09 05:29:22 PM  

6655321: Pepco has announced the hiring of another consumer advocate. He has many years experience of serving the public.
[www.welovetheiraqiinformationminister.com image 300x225]


I admit...I larfed
 
2012-07-09 05:29:36 PM  
This article in the Atlantic (pops) gives a good argument for why Pepco failed. It compares their performance to other power companies (like Virginia Power) that were in the same region and hit by the same storm.
 
2012-07-09 05:32:10 PM  
I like my socialized electricity (my power is provided by the city and is extremely reliabile).

Of course, I live in California where we don't have massive storms. We do have earthquakes occassionally, though, and the city is very good at trimming trees around the power lines.
 
2012-07-09 05:32:11 PM  

max_pooper: AzDownboy: FishyFred: I don't doubt that Pepco did as well as it possibly could under the circumstances.

But Pepco's best is farking terrible.

My power was out for three days. Here's my take:

1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

2.) The douchebags at Pepco central who've decided that regular tree trimming and lack of underground power lines are a way to run the company should be horsewhipped

Rerouting lines underground is prohibitively expensive, astrologically expensive to be more exact.


FTFY

/if you're going to use superlatives and call them "exact", you should really go for it
 
2012-07-09 05:32:55 PM  
I thought all you east coasty types were all bootstrappy? Couldn't you just generate your own power from Obammy unicorn farts and Solyndra solar panels?
 
2012-07-09 05:35:07 PM  

nelsonal: Gyrfalcon: dragonchild: AzDownboy: 1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

Look, if I was a field commander and I threw 50 light infantrymen in a daylight charge over a minefield against a division of tanks backed by close air support, I don't think the historians will care how hard they fought, "at all hours in terrible heat" or otherwise.

PEPCO doesn't get a passing grade for effort because they overworked their rank & file. They deliberately understaffed their disaster response team and you think they deserve a gold star for that?

Shouldn't both the line crews and your 50 infantrymen get gold stars for doing a hard job in rotten conditions?

None of that speaks to either PEPCO's management or your ability to command.

Only if Lord Tennyson happens to hear of it.


Well, sure, but epic poems are few & far between these days.
 
2012-07-09 05:36:36 PM  
It continues to baffle me. I've lived in the Northern Virginia for fourteen years now. The same thunderstorms, ice storms, shiat storms, blizzards, whatever hit us that hit Montgomery and Prince George counties. Sure, there's minor variations and micro-climates and What Not, and you can get an inch of rain in one part of Fairfax county and nothing just a few miles away in the same county, but overall, Dominion Virginia Power always beats PepCo at getting the juice back on. Always. And usually by a significant margin.

Why is that.
 
2012-07-09 05:39:18 PM  
You farkers with 2 and 3 day power outages need to shut up. In 2006 we had a bad derecho here in St. Louis and I was without power for 6 days. Later that winter we had a horrible ice storm: 5 days without electricity.

And be careful what you ask for when it comes to tree trimming. After those two outages the St. Louis based Ameren did some of the ugliest trim jobs ever. And 6 years later they've still got crews out.
 
2012-07-09 05:39:30 PM  

Dee Snarl: nelsonal: Gyrfalcon: dragonchild: AzDownboy: 1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

Look, if I was a field commander and I threw 50 light infantrymen in a daylight charge over a minefield against a division of tanks backed by close air support, I don't think the historians will care how hard they fought, "at all hours in terrible heat" or otherwise.

PEPCO doesn't get a passing grade for effort because they overworked their rank & file. They deliberately understaffed their disaster response team and you think they deserve a gold star for that?

Shouldn't both the line crews and your 50 infantrymen get gold stars for doing a hard job in rotten conditions?

None of that speaks to either PEPCO's management or your ability to command.

Only if Lord Tennyson happens to hear of it.

More like The Charge of the No Lights Brigade, right??


"From 2008 to 2010, Pepco CEO Joe Rigby earned $8.8 million and Pepco top officers earned more than $22 million. During that same period, Pepco reported $882 million in profits, paid no federal and state income taxes and received $817 million in tax refunds." Yet as the money rolled in, the Maryland Public Service Commission allowed Pepco to cut back on maintenance, in order to divert funds to dividends and management bonuses.

In 2011, there were Maryland statehouse hearings resulting in what was spun as a crackdown on Pepco. The "crackdown" was ridiculously modest -- a rule that Pepco must improve reliability by three percent per year. But the rule doesn't take effect until 2013, and the fine for a violation is $10,000, chickenfeed to a company with a $260 million net income in 2011.

Pepco faces a simple reliability equation: The more it spends on improving service, the less is available for dividends and executive bonuses. CEO Rigby is a major shareholder, so in effect awards himself a commission when he keeps infrastructure spending low and dividends high. After the mega-thunderstorm, Dominion Power took 14 hours to restore all its transformers and main feeder lines -- this is the first step in any utility's storm recovery -- while Pepco took 36 hours. That's because Pepco transformers were in poor repair when the storm hit, despite an advertising campaign promising improvements. Within 48 hours of the storm, Dominion had 2,000 out-of-state workers present to assist in restoration; Pepco had just 300. If Pepco drags its feet on recovery, the utility avoids paying doubletime or tripletime, plus expenses, to out-of-state crews. And Pepco knows it can drag its feet without any risk of action by Maryland regulators.
 
2012-07-09 05:43:16 PM  
East coasters use snarky passive aggressive signs to get their points across? If I was a crew man and saw that, I'd say let's do this area last.
 
2012-07-09 05:43:30 PM  
Aug. 30, 2010:
"Pepco has responded to criticisms with a beefed-up five-year plan, and sought to get ahead of Monday's barrage with a long list of ongoing and planned improvement projects."

Dec. 4, 2010:
"Pepco says it is embarking on a five-year program to improve reliability"

Dec. 21, 2011:
"This year, Pepco officials acknowledged their reliability problems and announced a five-year, multimillion-dollar effort to improve."

July 9, 2012:
"Anyone who has been out of power for a week certainly has a right to be upset, but we are investing $910 million in reliability enhancements and improvements over the next five years."

So...when exactly are they planning to get this 5-year plan going? You know, the one they announced 2 years ago?
 
2012-07-09 05:49:53 PM  
multivu.prnewswire.com
Not particularly useful after a thunderstorm
 
2012-07-09 05:50:01 PM  
When I lived in Painesville the city provided the power through the local power plant. After a wind storm knocked over one of the towers, the service was quickly restored. That being said about two summers ago the neighborhood kept losing power on a very hot day. The crews came out and replaced the transformer, which failed in a loud "bizzzzzzzzt" about an hour after it was replaced. Another transformer was brought out, and replaced, and that one worked for a few hours, before that lovely "bzzzzzzzzzzzzt" noise.

Finally, on day two, a bigger transformer was installed. Power resumed. Considering day one was a Sunday, I was impressed. Even though it took three tries.
 
2012-07-09 05:54:18 PM  
farm1.static.flickr.com

don't fark with me, fellas
 
2012-07-09 05:56:04 PM  

ayanami: max_pooper: AzDownboy: FishyFred: I don't doubt that Pepco did as well as it possibly could under the circumstances.

But Pepco's best is farking terrible.

My power was out for three days. Here's my take:

1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

2.) The douchebags at Pepco central who've decided that regular tree trimming and lack of underground power lines are a way to run the company should be horsewhipped

Rerouting lines underground is prohibitively expensive, astronomically expensive to be more exact.

Pepco central can suck a thousand cocks. I was out of power for two days, and I had friends out for much longer. But yeah, the crews themselves are pretty awesome, especially those guys who came from far away states to give us a hand.

As for rerouting power lines, the District city council considered simply allowing Pepco to bury lines when roadwork was already being done, thus allivating much of the cost. Pepco nixed the idea.


Digging and repaving is a small cost of installing underground electric line. There are separation requirements that means you just can't put them anywhere. In urban areas, underground space beneath roadways can sometimes be very crowded with gas lines, water lines, sewer lines and other utilities. Navigating a mess of underground utilities can be difficult, particularly when your talking about routing 30,000+ volts.

Also the actual cable used underground is much much expensive than the ones used overhead. Overhead cables are bare aluminum exposed to the open air which allows the heat to dissipate easily. Underground lines need to be insulated and protected against physical damage since they are in contact with earth. Also the ground around them provides such good thermal insulation the diameter of the cables needs to be larger to carry the same amount of current, more aluminum mean higher cost.

If those underground lines ever need to be repair or replaced, you are going to incur all the cost of excavation and replacement.
 
2012-07-09 05:57:07 PM  

Eriond: Aug. 30, 2010:
"Pepco has responded to criticisms with a beefed-up five-year plan, and sought to get ahead of Monday's barrage with a long list of ongoing and planned improvement projects."

Dec. 4, 2010:
"Pepco says it is embarking on a five-year program to improve reliability"

Dec. 21, 2011:
"This year, Pepco officials acknowledged their reliability problems and announced a five-year, multimillion-dollar effort to improve."

July 9, 2012:
"Anyone who has been out of power for a week certainly has a right to be upset, but we are investing $910 million in reliability enhancements and improvements over the next five years."

So...when exactly are they planning to get this 5-year plan going? You know, the one they announced 2 years ago?


They're using the Soviet model of a 5-year plan: When it doesn't work, pretend it never happened and start over.
 
2012-07-09 05:57:22 PM  

max_pooper: AzDownboy: FishyFred: I don't doubt that Pepco did as well as it possibly could under the circumstances.

But Pepco's best is farking terrible.

My power was out for three days. Here's my take:

1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

2.) The douchebags at Pepco central who've decided that regular tree trimming and lack of underground power lines are a way to run the company should be horsewhipped

Rerouting lines underground is prohibitively expensive, astronomically expensive to be more exact.


Also, when they are underground, it is so much harder to figure out what and where the problem is and then they have to dig to get at the lines (which, in winter, is hell).

So while there are advantages to buried lines, there are disadvantages. Don't be surprised when it takes even longer for the power to get restored when they have to troubleshoot & repair underground lines.

//worked for an electric company about 10 years ago and that is what the service guys used to tell me.
 
2012-07-09 06:00:05 PM  

Eriond: Aug. 30, 2010:
"Pepco has responded to criticisms with a beefed-up five-year plan, and sought to get ahead of Monday's barrage with a long list of ongoing and planned improvement projects."

Dec. 4, 2010:
"Pepco says it is embarking on a five-year program to improve reliability"

Dec. 21, 2011:
"This year, Pepco officials acknowledged their reliability problems and announced a five-year, multimillion-dollar effort to improve."

July 9, 2012:
"Anyone who has been out of power for a week certainly has a right to be upset, but we are investing $910 million in reliability enhancements and improvements over the next five years."

So...when exactly are they planning to get this 5-year plan going? You know, the one they announced 2 years ago?


graphics8.nytimes.com
Did someone say 'five-year plan'?
 
2012-07-09 06:02:08 PM  

max_pooper: AzDownboy: FishyFred: I don't doubt that Pepco did as well as it possibly could under the circumstances.

But Pepco's best is farking terrible.

My power was out for three days. Here's my take:

1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

2.) The douchebags at Pepco central who've decided that regular tree trimming and lack of underground power lines are a way to run the company should be horsewhipped

Rerouting lines underground to celestial bodies is prohibitively expensive, astronomically expensive to be more exact.

 
2012-07-09 06:05:10 PM  

max_pooper: ayanami: max_pooper: AzDownboy: FishyFred:


So I read all this nonsense and obviously, you didn't see this, so reposting: From 2008 to 2010, Pepco CEO Joe Rigby earned $8.8 million and Pepco top officers earned more than $22 million. During that same period, Pepco reported $882 million in profits, paid no federal and state income taxes and received $817 million in tax refunds." Yet as the money rolled in, the Maryland Public Service Commission allowed Pepco to cut back on maintenance, in order to divert funds to dividends and management bonuses.

In 2011, there were Maryland statehouse hearings resulting in what was spun as a crackdown on Pepco. The "crackdown" was ridiculously modest -- a rule that Pepco must improve reliability by three percent per year. But the rule doesn't take effect until 2013, and the fine for a violation is $10,000, chickenfeed to a company with a $260 million net income in 2011.

Pepco faces a simple reliability equation: The more it spends on improving service, the less is available for dividends and executive bonuses. CEO Rigby is a major shareholder, so in effect awards himself a commission when he keeps infrastructure spending low and dividends high. After the mega-thunderstorm, Dominion Power took 14 hours to restore all its transformers and main feeder lines -- this is the first step in any utility's storm recovery -- while Pepco took 36 hours. That's because Pepco transformers were in poor repair when the storm hit, despite an advertising campaign promising improvements. Within 48 hours of the storm, Dominion had 2,000 out-of-state workers present to assist in restoration; Pepco had just 300. If Pepco drags its feet on recovery, the utility avoids paying doubletime or tripletime, plus expenses, to out-of-state crews. And Pepco knows it can drag its feet without any risk of action by Maryland regulators.

fark them, they can afford it. I had tree branches in the wires outside my house for 3 farking days. Not that needed to be cut, but were just hanging there.
 
2012-07-09 06:05:45 PM  
FTA: Being the customer advocate must surely, I thought, place Greer in frequent disagreement with company leadership, especially considering how frustrated customers and elected officials often are with company leadership. But Greer said nope.
I can really believe that since she is a blatant shill for the company.
 
2012-07-09 06:09:34 PM  

bglove25: max_pooper: ayanami: max_pooper: AzDownboy: FishyFred:

So I read all this nonsense and obviously, you didn't see this, so reposting: From 2008 to 2010, Pepco CEO Joe Rigby earned $8.8 million and Pepco top officers earned more than $22 million. During that same period, Pepco reported $882 million in profits, paid no federal and state income taxes and received $817 million in tax refunds." Yet as the money rolled in, the Maryland Public Service Commission allowed Pepco to cut back on maintenance, in order to divert funds to dividends and management bonuses.

In 2011, there were Maryland statehouse hearings resulting in what was spun as a crackdown on Pepco. The "crackdown" was ridiculously modest -- a rule that Pepco must improve reliability by three percent per year. But the rule doesn't take effect until 2013, and the fine for a violation is $10,000, chickenfeed to a company with a $260 million net income in 2011.

Pepco faces a simple reliability equation: The more it spends on improving service, the less is available for dividends and executive bonuses. CEO Rigby is a major shareholder, so in effect awards himself a commission when he keeps infrastructure spending low and dividends high. After the mega-thunderstorm, Dominion Power took 14 hours to restore all its transformers and main feeder lines -- this is the first step in any utility's storm recovery -- while Pepco took 36 hours. That's because Pepco transformers were in poor repair when the storm hit, despite an advertising campaign promising improvements. Within 48 hours of the storm, Dominion had 2,000 out-of-state workers present to assist in restoration; Pepco had just 300. If Pepco drags its feet on recovery, the utility avoids paying doubletime or tripletime, plus expenses, to out-of-state crews. And Pepco knows it can drag its feet without any risk of action by Maryland regulators.

fark them, they can afford it. I had tree branches in the wires outside my house for 3 farking days. Not that needed t ...


That's really appalling. Another good rationale for CEOs to be required to divest their stock while they're CEOs.
 
2012-07-09 06:09:51 PM  
bglove25: In 2011, there were Maryland statehouse hearings resulting in what was spun as a crackdown on Pepco. The "crackdown" was ridiculously modest -- a rule that Pepco must improve reliability by three percent per year. But the rule doesn't take effect until 2013, and the fine for a violation is $10,000, chickenfeed to a company with a $260 million net income in 2011.

They also fined them $1 million, which isn't really "ridiculously modest". I know, I know, in comparison to $882 million in profits, yadda yadda.
 
2012-07-09 06:10:10 PM  
The thing about repairing an underground line is that they go bad much less often, and a tree falling onto the pavement is not going to sever an underground line. In fact, underground cables are watertight, stress-relieved, and made of cross-linked fiberglass-embedded polyethylene which is pretty badass stuff in and of itself. Fact is, underground cables almost *never* go bad unless you're in an earthquake zone or you hire very stupid construction personnel that own large equipment.

Try to compare that to an overhead cable that can actually get severed by the wind. No serious comparison is possible. Natural monopolies like utilities are controlled by the public sector in their areas, and if a bond intitiative were put in place, it could be done. But will it? Nope. The real reason we don't have underground cabling already is because of cheap-ass conservatives who complain about manning up and paying their taxes.

//worked as a 50kV cable splicer during most of my 20's
 
2012-07-09 06:15:14 PM  
We were out of power for about 36 hours.

Not as long as many, but consider that we live within 200 yards of a major highway (I-270), in one of the most
densely populated areas of Montgomery county, MD, and unlike in 2010 no trees ripped the power couplings out
of the houses (probably because the trees still haven't grown back from when Pepco had no choice but to trim
them during repairs).

I've had friends not far from me who were out for 6+ days.

After the debacle of the storm of 2010, Pepco has absolutely no excuse to hide behind for their active malfeasance
this time around, and while I expect there will be some sacrificial lambs tossed to the crowd in the coming months,
they will continue laughing to the bank.
 
2012-07-09 06:19:08 PM  

max_pooper: AzDownboy: FishyFred: I don't doubt that Pepco did as well as it possibly could under the circumstances.

But Pepco's best is farking terrible.

My power was out for three days. Here's my take:

1.) The work crews who were out at all hours in terrible heat getting the power back on, they did a kick-ass job and get my sincere and heartfelt respect

2.) The douchebags at Pepco central who've decided that regular tree trimming and lack of underground power lines are a way to run the company should be horsewhipped

Rerouting lines underground is prohibitively expensive, astronomically expensive to be more exact.


$500,000 to $3 million per mile, in case anyone was wondering.
 
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