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(BBC)   Worms live longer in space. Shai Hulud   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 36
    More: Interesting, Caenorhabditis elegans, University of Nottingham, Columbia disaster, space ages, space missions, International Space Station, Nathaniel Szewczyk, spaceflights  
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932 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jul 2012 at 10:38 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



36 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-07-09 10:42:32 AM
He who controls the spice, controls the universe.
 
2012-07-09 10:44:13 AM
Aw carp, my stillsuit is at the dry-cleaner's.
 
2012-07-09 10:46:50 AM
Especially if you're on the receiving end of the gom jabbar.

/Get out of my mind!
 
2012-07-09 10:46:53 AM
Ok... that headline made me snort coffee
 
2012-07-09 10:47:41 AM
images3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-07-09 10:52:12 AM
I hear it's amazing when the famous purple stuffed worm in flap-jaw space with the tuning fork does a raw blink on Hara-kiri Rock.

/I need scissors! 61!
 
2012-07-09 10:52:29 AM

wraithmare: /Get out of my mind!


"Not until you tell them both who I really am."

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-07-09 10:56:55 AM
I'm the god emperor, getting a kick out of these comments
 
2012-07-09 11:00:28 AM
walk without rhythm and you won't attract the worm
 
2012-07-09 11:09:20 AM
Bless the Maker and His water.
Bless the coming and going of Him.
May His passage cleanse the world.
May He keep the world for His people.
 
2012-07-09 11:10:18 AM
What's going on here?
 
2012-07-09 11:11:26 AM
The mystery of life isn't a problem to solve, but a reality to experience.
 
2012-07-09 11:12:47 AM
When God hath ordained a creature to die in a particular place, He causeth that creature's wants to direct him to that place.
 
2012-07-09 11:21:23 AM
What's hilarious about this story is that this is a very similar experiment to the one designed by the high school student (a few links down I think). He designed an experiment with C. elegans, got it voted up to be taken to the ISS, and then the astronauts never opened it up. That kid needs to bust out his tinfoil hat!
 
2012-07-09 11:33:59 AM
Usul, we have worm sign the likes of which even God has never seen.
 
2012-07-09 11:34:08 AM
Iiiinteresting. So space research could be used, and linked to, longeivity research. How intriguing....

I wonder if this is gonna give some people Divide By Zero errors.
 
2012-07-09 11:36:24 AM
i457.photobucket.com

i457.photobucket.com

i457.photobucket.com

i457.photobucket.com

//and I'm spent.
 
2012-07-09 11:47:42 AM
Jacurutu!
 
2012-07-09 11:52:30 AM
Based on whose clock? Earth based or NEO/LEO based?
 
2012-07-09 11:56:03 AM
Set your body ablaze!

/Nothing's obscure on Fark
 
2012-07-09 12:00:19 PM

wippit: wraithmare: /Get out of my mind!

"Not until you tell them both who I really am."

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 400x300]


Holy crap. I never realized that Alia was Alicia Witt. Damn.
 
2012-07-09 12:00:31 PM
little makers.
 
2012-07-09 12:27:48 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-07-09 12:33:08 PM
Who can turn away the Angel of Death?
 
2012-07-09 12:40:08 PM
Charles Hoy Fort speculated, tongue-in-cheek (after inventing the word "teleportation" for unexplained falls of frogs, fish, meat, etc.) that the world was originally "colonized" by such falls of living organisms. He proposed that not only simple critters like worms, insects, infusoria (bacteria, etc.) came to Earth this way, but that a sort of Providence sowed the Earth with larger animals, like elephants.

He wasn't half blowing smoke up your arses, but the proponents of Panspermia sometimes believe that organisms such as the water bear and nematodes like C. elegans could have come to Earth frozen in comets or deep in meteorites.

Some of these organisms have tremendous endurance when exposed to vacuum, high levels of radiation and prologued dessication. They could easily travel freeze-dried in a vacuum for unknown lengths of time. D. radiodurans, for example, is a bacterium that is found everywhere on Earth and survives exposure to radiation by being able to piece together broken DNA thanks to excellent repair mechanisms.

Perhaps these tiny worms live longer in space because they are adapted for space travel. Perhaps not. It is a very long shot that this is the case, but it is not impossible, which means that Panspermia is, unlike Creationism or Intelligent Design, within the bounds of respectable science provided no outrageous claims are made and efforts are made to test the hypothesis.

It has been tested. Scientists have fired bacteria-laden blocks of glass at walls at speeds like those of a meteor falling to Earth. Bacteria have survived the impacts.

Furthermore, when the Space Shuttle crashed into the atmosphere at something like 18,000 mph, it was carrying a cannister of nemotodes. The cannister was found and opened, and the nemotodes were still breeding four or five generations after the crash. Alive and well and reproducing after an impact that would kill a mouse let alone a man.

Many organisms will live longer if you prevent them from breeding, if you expose them to harsh conditions that would prevent them from breeding, or if you cut their food supply, thus preventing them from breeding. This is Darwinian natural selection at work--organisms that can survive to breed after long periods of drought, famine or simply not finding a mate, may eventually mate, passing on the genes that allowed them to be so persistant.

Perhaps the persistence of C. elegans is related to the harsh conditions it has to face on Earth, or perhaps they were inherited from a space-faring ancestor brought to Earth from Mars, Europa, or some more distant world. There's only one way to find out: more research is needed.

Care should be taken not to contaminate Mars with new life just in case native lifeforms are still there. Once we solve that mystery, we can colonize Mars should it prove to be a dead planet without life or fossils. Some of the earliest passangers to Mars are right under our noses, so to speak, or else our feet. We could send unmanned missions containing a range of organisms and see how many of them we can keep alive when they hit the ground, thus making it safer for astronauts, cosmonauts, taikonauts, etc., to land when we are ready to send them.
 
2012-07-09 12:48:47 PM

wraithmare: Especially if you're on the receiving end of the gom jabbar.

/Get out of my mind!


I think you mean the abdul jabbar, the long-legged, high-handed enemy.

/Doon!
 
2012-07-09 01:07:56 PM

brantgoose: Perhaps the persistence of C. elegans is related to the harsh conditions it has to face on Earth, or perhaps they were inherited from a space-faring ancestor brought to Earth from Mars, Europa, or some more distant world. There's only one way to find out: more research is needed.


Those little effers aren't persistant. They can "survive" but not reproduce in very cold temperatures, but generally they are very prone to dessication and most do die when frozen.

Waterbears, on the other hand... they'd be the meteor-critters
 
2012-07-09 01:13:32 PM
www.bloodandinkrecords.com
 
2012-07-09 01:26:06 PM

Saiga410: Based on whose clock? Earth based or NEO/LEO based?


They're the same to the accuracy we need, if you're referencing relativistic effects. I don't think the researchers were claiming that the worms lived A few microseconds longer.
 
2012-07-09 02:20:18 PM
Ya Hya Chouhada!
 
2012-07-09 02:24:57 PM
www.themovieblog.com

Want to build a replica of this, would make an awesome desk piece.
 
2012-07-09 03:31:22 PM

brantgoose: Charles Hoy Fort speculated, tongue-in-cheek (after inventing the word "teleportation" for unexplained falls of frogs, fish, meat, etc.) that the world was originally "colonized" by such falls of living organisms. He proposed that not only simple critters like worms, insects, infusoria (bacteria, etc.) came to Earth this way, but that a sort of Providence sowed the Earth with larger animals, like elephants.

He wasn't half blowing smoke up your arses, but the proponents of Panspermia sometimes believe that organisms such as the water bear and nematodes like C. elegans could have come to Earth frozen in comets or deep in meteorites.

Some of these organisms have tremendous endurance when exposed to vacuum, high levels of radiation and prologued dessication. They could easily travel freeze-dried in a vacuum for unknown lengths of time. D. radiodurans, for example, is a bacterium that is found everywhere on Earth and survives exposure to radiation by being able to piece together broken DNA thanks to excellent repair mechanisms.

Perhaps these tiny worms live longer in space because they are adapted for space travel. Perhaps not. It is a very long shot that this is the case, but it is not impossible, which means that Panspermia is, unlike Creationism or Intelligent Design, within the bounds of respectable science provided no outrageous claims are made and efforts are made to test the hypothesis.

It has been tested. Scientists have fired bacteria-laden blocks of glass at walls at speeds like those of a meteor falling to Earth. Bacteria have survived the impacts.

Furthermore, when the Space Shuttle crashed into the atmosphere at something like 18,000 mph, it was carrying a cannister of nemotodes. The cannister was found and opened, and the nemotodes were still breeding four or five generations after the crash. Alive and well and reproducing after an impact that would kill a mouse let alone a man.

Many organisms will live longer if you prevent them from breeding, if you ...


4/10. Almost had me with the Space Water Bears.
 
2012-07-09 04:08:44 PM
Living longer IN space... Now that is a popcorn worthy topic.

/Where are our resident spaceatheists when you need them?
 
2012-07-09 04:18:36 PM
Not if they are left with weapons.

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-07-09 09:53:34 PM

Lonestar: Not if they are left with weapons.

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 430x320]


Came here for this, thank you.
 
2012-07-10 02:35:07 PM
I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past, I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.
 
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