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(Falkvinge)   The story of the Pirate Bay and how the Swedish justice system became hopelessly corrupted, in the words of Peter Sunde   (falkvinge.net) divider line 29
    More: Interesting, The Pirate Bay, Peter Sunde, country legal systems, Sveriges Television, Time Passes, trade sanctions, Pirate Party, public television  
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2281 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jul 2012 at 9:34 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-09 10:03:38 AM  
Intellectual property can, and should, be defended and protected.
 
2012-07-09 10:08:15 AM  
Unlike Somalia, where piracy occurs mainly because there is no government that can (when made aware of the problem) act to correct the problem, in Sweden there actually is a government that can and has acted to correct what it saw as a blight on the country's reputation and the global economy.

When people are doing illegal things and helping others do illegal things, generally speaking the government of the country in which they are based has a legal, moral and ethical (as well as political) obligation to do something about it.
 
2012-07-09 10:09:30 AM  
I'm a hypocrite. I agree with Cinaed in that IP should be defended and protected.

But I also have used TPB to download some copywritten music and movies.

I'll have to live with myself somehow.
 
2012-07-09 10:12:52 AM  
That was a fantastic read. I hope the pardon is granted.
 
2012-07-09 10:17:14 AM  

Cinaed: Intellectual property can, and should, be defended and protected.


I'd agree, thogh intellectual property should have a limited life before enterin the public domin (and the current limits are much too long).
 
2012-07-09 10:20:31 AM  
Media is not intellectual property. Once you whore out your thoughts and ideas, turn it into something consumable and release it to the world, guess what? It's not yours anymore. Not in the world we live in today. Sorry, but things are just not as they used to be. If it can be broken down into ones and zeroes and distributed, it will be.
 
2012-07-09 10:22:01 AM  
The whiney "pity me" letter from the main guy is hilarious. He goes on and on about how the things that people are copying should be free anyway like books, movies, TV shows and music just appear out of thin air and aren't the hard work of a lot of people.
 
2012-07-09 10:23:13 AM  

dpcotta: Media is not intellectual property. Once you whore out your thoughts and ideas, turn it into something consumable and release it to the world, guess what? It's not yours anymore. Not in the world we live in today. Sorry, but things are just not as they used to be. If it can be broken down into ones and zeroes and distributed, it will be.


You've never created anything in your life.
 
2012-07-09 10:30:54 AM  

Cinaed: Intellectual property can, and should, be defended and protected.


And it is in many countries. From the letter it isn't clear if Sweden is one of them. And to me, being punished for something that wasn't criminal when you did it is far worse than theft of IP.
 
2012-07-09 10:32:52 AM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: The whiney "pity me" letter from the main guy is hilarious. He goes on and on about how the things that people are copying should be free anyway like books, movies, TV shows and music just appear out of thin air and aren't the hard work of a lot of people.


Did you read a different letter? All he says is that they convicted him for doing a) things that were "theoretically possible" for him to have done (like set up a load balancer) and b) things that aren't crimes (like setting up a load balancer). Add to that that (according to him) they never really proved a crime happened at all, and the...let's call them "untoward associations"...of several of the prosecutors and judges - you begin to see some smoke.

No fire yet, but it's mighty acrid in Scandinavia-town.
 
2012-07-09 10:41:12 AM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: The whiney "pity me" letter from the main guy is hilarious. He goes on and on about how the things that people are copying should be free anyway like books, movies, TV shows and music just appear out of thin air and aren't the hard work of a lot of people.


Meth, not even once.
 
2012-07-09 10:53:26 AM  
Piracy fills the gaps in archaic and failing distribution models.

My wife and I follow 2, maybe 3 tv shows at a time and don't have the patience to channel surf, so cable isn't worth the money. We no longer have a disc player and have no interest in owning discs or waiting for their release. We regularly use Vudu, Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon and quite happily pay for what we consume. But if your show/movie isn't available through modern means of consumption, then our "piracy" isn't theft at all because you never had a sale to lose in the first place. How can we rip you off if we never set foot in your store?

Someone else said it best: Scarcity is a shiatty business model.

I'm looking at you, Showtime. Why don't you just sell torrent files from your website for $2/pop? Your shows are out there anyway, and this way you could make a few bucks from us honest people without having to build a new distribution infrastructure.

/ip attorney
//sleeps well enough
 
2012-07-09 10:57:01 AM  
You got to love the fact that the lead investigator was hired by hollywood as soon as the investigation was over and the judge was a member of a copyright group.
 
2012-07-09 11:01:37 AM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: dpcotta: Media is not intellectual property. Once you whore out your thoughts and ideas, turn it into something consumable and release it to the world, guess what? It's not yours anymore. Not in the world we live in today. Sorry, but things are just not as they used to be. If it can be broken down into ones and zeroes and distributed, it will be.

You've never created anything in your life.


Actually I'm a writer, and I seem to have created mad in you. Go watch Brave again so you can feel better about yourself.
 
2012-07-09 11:04:48 AM  
Vote Pirate Party. Show the bastards what they're up against.
 
2012-07-09 11:58:08 AM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: The whiney "pity me" letter from the main guy is hilarious. He goes on and on about how the things that people are copying should be free anyway like books, movies, TV shows and music just appear out of thin air and aren't the hard work of a lot of people.


The books that people are looking for a copy of to read are usually old enough that the creator has already died. For those making tv shows, they have already been paid when the show was first created and aired.
 
2012-07-09 11:58:39 AM  
If you don't pay the creator who develops the stuff you like, eventually they go do something that puts food on the table - like flipping burgers.

There is no business model that can compete with one-click piracy. You can't develop one that's simpler than "type it into google and download".

Within 5 years - almost all TV will be aimed at demographics that don't know how to use BitTorrent. Why? Because you can reliably make a buck out of people who watch TV - you can't make it out of nerds who format shift and scream about how producers should play "find the unicorn" business model.
 
2012-07-09 12:05:11 PM  

narkor: you can't make it out of nerds who format shift and scream about how producers should play "find the unicorn" business model.


The ever-growing subscriber lists of HuluPlus, Netflix, HBOGo (though that model is a pile of piles of crap) and similar services would beg to differ.

The problem is that the suits are fearful - "If we expand into a new technology, how will we continue to monetize the old technologies? We'll lose those streams!" Just like 8-track sales have plummeted, and no music has been sold since.

// they could have had a monetized Napster in 2000, but instead chose to try and litigate it out of existence
// then, just 5 short years later - BAM! - iTunes
 
2012-07-09 12:10:02 PM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: dpcotta: Media is not intellectual property. Once you whore out your thoughts and ideas, turn it into something consumable and release it to the world, guess what? It's not yours anymore. Not in the world we live in today. Sorry, but things are just not as they used to be. If it can be broken down into ones and zeroes and distributed, it will be.

You've never created anything in your life.


I have, I make my living from it and you know what?

Copy it all, get me famous, give me all the free publicity you can. When a few people have downloaded my work I will say in a news publication that people are downloading it which will make more people download it then I`ll take pre-orders for my next project which will eclipse the sales from my last one.

The only people who would not want the above are the middle men because it cuts them out.
 
2012-07-09 12:24:26 PM  

narkor: There is no business model that can compete with one-click piracy. You can't develop one that's simpler than "type it into google and download".


blog.gameagent.com
c7.valuewalk.com
img.brothersoft.com
 
2012-07-09 12:27:12 PM  

johncspartan38: You got to love the fact that the lead investigator was hired by hollywood as soon as the investigation was over and the judge was a member of a copyright group.



Seriously! I mean, I may not agree with the way the media organizations are going about trying to "protect their IP" but I understand it (even if I think it's ill-advised and counter-productive).... but controlling governments like puppets to do their bidding through a system of bought politicians, lackeys hired from and in government and people in power abusing their authority? Ok, FARK THAT all the way.
 
2012-07-09 01:09:52 PM  
Sweden, the US, and other western countries aren't the worst when it comes to ignoring intellectual property rights as far as I can see. Every movie I've streamed online has been from Russia or China. Some of them still dubbed in Russian or with Chinese characters in the subtitles.

/hates movie theaters, used to just wait till the movie was on tv to see it
 
2012-07-09 01:42:05 PM  

Honest Bender: narkor: There is no business model that can compete with one-click piracy. You can't develop one that's simpler than "type it into google and download".

[STEAM]


I never thought that I'd own as many games as I do on steam, even re-buying old games I have bought before (like X-Com) because 99 cents for it to work on a modern OS and not having to look for old physical media. I haven't illegally downloaded a game in forever- my Steam back catalog is too long.
 
2012-07-09 02:02:11 PM  

Honest Bender: narkor: There is no business model that can compete with one-click piracy. You can't develop one that's simpler than "type it into google and download".

[blog.gameagent.com image 256x256]
[c7.valuewalk.com image 128x128]
[img.brothersoft.com image 64x64]


Pretty much what this guy said.
 
2012-07-09 02:31:59 PM  

narkor: If you don't pay the creator who develops the stuff you like, eventually they go do something that puts food on the table - like flipping burgers.

There is no business model that can compete with one-click piracy. You can't develop one that's simpler than "type it into google and download".

Within 5 years - almost all TV will be aimed at demographics that don't know how to use BitTorrent. Why? Because you can reliably make a buck out of people who watch TV - you can't make it out of nerds who format shift and scream about how producers should play "find the unicorn" business model.


Pretty sure this has been covered already. But I'd like to point out what failures Netflix, Hulu, iTunes, and Steam are. People are pirating movies, music and games rather than paying for these services thus their complete failure.

Seriously, I *could* pirate any movies etc I like. I don't because I can generally find what I want between Netflix or Hulu. Heck if I really like something I'll even buy the Dvd. If I would start pirating things it would be in retaliation for not making the content more easily available or trying to force me to pay for cable in order to view it.
 
2012-07-09 02:58:37 PM  
As someone who has frequently paid for some "intellectual property" only to be ripped off by it in the form of it not working as advertised -I am an advocate of piracy to test the grounds.

That being said, if you really like something and use it often -you should pay for it.
 
2012-07-09 05:53:34 PM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: You've never created anything in your life.


I write software all day long. Thanks to the IP release I was required to sign at hire, you will never, ever see any of my hard work.

/which is fine by me since I give them what they pay for
//which is to say I'm glad you'll never see it :)
 
2012-07-09 07:25:39 PM  

cefm: Unlike Somalia, where piracy occurs mainly because there is no government that can (when made aware of the problem) act to correct the problem, in Sweden there actually is a government that can and has acted to correct what it saw as a blight on the country's reputation and the global economy.

When people are doing illegal things and helping others do illegal things, generally speaking the government of the country in which they are based has a legal, moral and ethical (as well as political) obligation to do something about it.


Like crooked cops?

Palease.
 
2012-07-10 02:49:39 PM  
Convicted if abetting a non-crime. It is not illegal in Sweden. The Pirate Bay is a legal thing.

People seem to miss that part.
 
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