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(USA Today)   Natural, organic items flood supermarkets, America flees in terror   (usatoday.com) divider line 43
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1739 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Jul 2012 at 10:28 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-08 09:49:20 AM
I for one am tired of all the inorganic food they sell.
 
2012-07-08 10:33:51 AM
Except that the organic label is so watered down that it means almost nothing now.

Go to farmers markets, buy things that actually look like food and learn to cook them.
 
2012-07-08 10:36:50 AM

vartian: Except that the organic label is so watered down that it means almost nothing now.

Go to farmers markets, buy things that actually look like food and learn to cook them.


Or buy stuff "[insert state here] Tilth certified" as those certifications are much more legit than the USDA/QAI rubberstamps.

Buying local is probably more important than buying organic so hit up your local farmer's market like vartian says. The food isn't that much more expensive than what you get in the store and you get to meet the people that grew, raised or killed it.
 
2012-07-08 10:37:49 AM
Personally, I like it. Around here, H.E.B. has been re-modeling all their stores to where it really takes some effort to get to the processed stuff. By the time I get to the center aisles, I have enough fresh stuff that I'm only hitting the middle shelves for stuff like olive oil or something.

I love their meat department since it's the only place to get grass fed beef around here. All the butchers around me admitted that they use the same stuff as commercial grade. At least the mexican butchers drown it in 100 different spices for good fajita meat.
 
2012-07-08 10:38:44 AM

vartian: Except that the organic label is so watered down that it means almost nothing now.

Go to farmers markets, buy things that actually look like food and learn to cook them.


that's great, but we still eat bread, buy milk and sometimes like things like orange juice.

We shop a lot at trader joe's, because our local supermarkets will sell anything as "natural".

/okay, to be fair, we're getting a lot of our bread from a local bakery now (that sells at the farmers market).
 
2012-07-08 10:40:42 AM

alwaysjaded: Personally, I like it. Around here, H.E.B. has been re-modeling all their stores to where it really takes some effort to get to the processed stuff. By the time I get to the center aisles, I have enough fresh stuff that I'm only hitting the middle shelves for stuff like olive oil or something.

I love their meat department since it's the only place to get grass fed beef around here. All the butchers around me admitted that they use the same stuff as commercial grade. At least the mexican butchers drown it in 100 different spices for good fajita meat.


ooo, I hate you so much. We have family in San Antonio, and went to visit a few years ago. H.E.B. is the best grocery store.
We have a Wegmans moving in nearby at least.
 
2012-07-08 10:44:41 AM

Torsoheap: Buying local is probably more important than buying organic so hit up your local farmer's market like vartian says. The food isn't that much more expensive than what you get in the store and you get to meet the people that grew, raised or killed it.


If double to triple the price isn't "that much more expensive," I'd love to have your food budget.
/many berries were $1x.yy/lb.
//CARROTS were $4.99/lb
 
2012-07-08 10:53:48 AM

vartian: Except that the organic label is so watered down that it means almost nothing now.

Go to farmers markets, buy things that actually look like food and learn to cook them.


I don't trust the Chinese Organic.
 
2012-07-08 10:54:11 AM
Why not, when you can charge double the price without having to take any extra steps other than repackaging the product. And you can price poor people out of your store at the same time, so it's a win win for everyone!
 
2012-07-08 10:56:00 AM
 
2012-07-08 11:04:53 AM
Ugh I WISH I could find organic food around here...

farking 50 ingredients for bread. BREAD. This place is hell.
 
2012-07-08 11:29:28 AM

Dancin_In_Anson: BULLSHIAT!


WHERE IS YOUR FREE MARKET NOW?!?!
 
2012-07-08 11:32:51 AM

pivazena: Ugh I WISH I could find organic food around here...

farking 50 ingredients for bread. BREAD. This place is hell.


I would love to find a loaf of bread in a supermarket that didnt have a bazillion ingredients and is as sweet as angel food cake.
Also, I dont trust cheap food unless it's fruit or vegetables that are in season or favorable conditions have caused a bumper crop. I wont eat chicken thats being advertised at .39 a pound.
We live in a sad state when white, natural cheese is now a marketing ploy.
 
2012-07-08 11:48:31 AM

vartian: Go to farmers supermarkets, buy things that actually look like food and learn to cook them.


Fixed.

There was a big exposé of "farmers markets" here in Cali a few years ago that showed the overwhelming majority of vendors simply buy commercially grown fruits and veggies to sell at ridiculous mark-ups to a gullible public. They're just sellers...they aren't even farmers. Unless you buy directly from a certified organic farm you have absolutely NO assurances that the food you buy is anything like "natural" or "organic".
 
2012-07-08 12:25:03 PM

ajgeek: Torsoheap: Buying local is probably more important than buying organic so hit up your local farmer's market like vartian says. The food isn't that much more expensive than what you get in the store and you get to meet the people that grew, raised or killed it.

If double to triple the price isn't "that much more expensive," I'd love to have your food budget.
/many berries were $1x.yy/lb.
//CARROTS were $4.99/lb


Huh. The one half a mile from my house in East Bumfark, NY has produce for maybe 25 to 50 cents/lb more than what you pay in the grocery store.

The one in Sunnyvale, CA where I used to live had produce which was cheaper than what it cost in the store. God bless Watsonville, CA and it's four growing seasons per year.

I do understand that a lot of farmer's markets take the opportunity to rip people off.
 
2012-07-08 01:23:45 PM

Torsoheap: ajgeek: Torsoheap: Buying local is probably more important than buying organic so hit up your local farmer's market like vartian says. The food isn't that much more expensive than what you get in the store and you get to meet the people that grew, raised or killed it.

If double to triple the price isn't "that much more expensive," I'd love to have your food budget.
/many berries were $1x.yy/lb.
//CARROTS were $4.99/lb

Huh. The one half a mile from my house in East Bumfark, NY has produce for maybe 25 to 50 cents/lb more than what you pay in the grocery store.

The one in Sunnyvale, CA where I used to live had produce which was cheaper than what it cost in the store. God bless Watsonville, CA and it's four growing seasons per year.

I do understand that a lot of farmer's markets take the opportunity to rip people off.


I've seen a yuppie market (specifically one in Michigan); the prices are really high compared to the grocery stores. I think that helps people to feel even more betters about buying local.

But where I am in MD, they have a lot of competition from other local growers, so prices are low and quantity is high. The grocery stores have a lot more locally raised produce (beets the size of your fist!).

We found more nearby local farms raising beef, pork, goat, chicken, than I could believe. This is almost always more expensive than the store, but the animals are well-treated, grass or bug-fed, and of very high quality.
 
2012-07-08 01:46:51 PM

Katie98_KT:

ooo, I hate you so much. We have family in San Antonio, and went to visit a few years ago. H.E.B. is the best grocery store.
We have a Wegmans moving in nearby at least.


They weren't always like that. Something clicked a few years ago and they decided to make it more like Central Market. They make some of the best in-store stuff now. Torillias, dips, and the meat market has a wide range of grass fed beef. It's the only place I will go now.
 
2012-07-08 02:58:19 PM

Torsoheap: I do understand that a lot of farmer's markets take the opportunity to rip people off.


I think that's the kicker right there. Many of the farmer's markets know their dipshiats I mean morons I MEAN CUSTOMER BASE and congregate around Universities, malls and higher end grocery stores around here. Essentially if you see money in the area you will find a farmer's market. And they are the NICEST people too (gee... I fraking wonder why...)!

One thing the Organic craze has given me is a smug detector that's better than my gaydar. Nothing wrong with the second, plenty wrong with the first.
 
2012-07-08 03:16:32 PM

Revek: I for one am tired of all the inorganic food they sell.


Hard to digest.
 
2012-07-08 03:21:19 PM

Katie98_KT: alwaysjaded: Personally, I like it. Around here, H.E.B. has been re-modeling all their stores to where it really takes some effort to get to the processed stuff. By the time I get to the center aisles, I have enough fresh stuff that I'm only hitting the middle shelves for stuff like olive oil or something.

I love their meat department since it's the only place to get grass fed beef around here. All the butchers around me admitted that they use the same stuff as commercial grade. At least the mexican butchers drown it in 100 different spices for good fajita meat.

ooo, I hate you so much. We have family in San Antonio, and went to visit a few years ago. H.E.B. is the best grocery store.
We have a Wegmans moving in nearby at least.


I got to visit the HEB+ last time I was there. Wow.

My wife thinks I'm crazy for enjoying grocery shopping and wanted to leave. Then I showed her the pile of beef parts in the meat section. She waited in the car after that.
 
2012-07-08 05:52:53 PM

StoneColdAtheist: vartian: Go to farmers supermarkets, buy things that actually look like food and learn to cook them.

Fixed.

There was a big exposé of "farmers markets" here in Cali a few years ago that showed the overwhelming majority of vendors simply buy commercially grown fruits and veggies to sell at ridiculous mark-ups to a gullible public. They're just sellers...they aren't even farmers. Unless you buy directly from a certified organic farm you have absolutely NO assurances that the food you buy is anything like "natural" or "organic".


Reminds me of going to the pumpkin farm in the fall to get pumpkins for Halloween. We were in the hay trailer on our way "down to the south field" and I realized I had left my knife at home. I mentioned that we might have to do some twisting to get the pumpkins off the vine to my wife, and the guy driving the tractor said "No problem, our people cut the ripe ones off in the mornings so y'all don't have to worry about that."
As we were searching the field for the perfect pumpkins, in drives a truck (I didn't realize until just then we were right by the road) with a bunch of teenagers and boxes on the back. The boxes were the same ones I had seen in the grocery store full of pumpkins from somewhere else, and the kids were dropping pumpkins from the boxes in amongst the vines. Really put the whole "Farm Market" thing into perspective.
 
2012-07-08 06:07:30 PM

pivazena: Ugh I WISH I could find organic food around here...

farking 50 ingredients for bread. BREAD. This place is hell.


for grocery store stuff, try Vermont Bread Company. Pretty damn good and mostly natural. Not the same as a good bakery, but nothing really is.
 
2012-07-08 06:40:29 PM
I don't know about all y'all but the only organic foods I buy are salt and bottled water. Yessir.
 
2012-07-08 07:01:42 PM

Chevello: StoneColdAtheist: vartian: Go to farmers supermarkets, buy things that actually look like food and learn to cook them.

Fixed.

There was a big exposé of "farmers markets" here in Cali a few years ago that showed the overwhelming majority of vendors simply buy commercially grown fruits and veggies to sell at ridiculous mark-ups to a gullible public. They're just sellers...they aren't even farmers. Unless you buy directly from a certified organic farm you have absolutely NO assurances that the food you buy is anything like "natural" or "organic".

Reminds me of going to the pumpkin farm in the fall to get pumpkins for Halloween. We were in the hay trailer on our way "down to the south field" and I realized I had left my knife at home. I mentioned that we might have to do some twisting to get the pumpkins off the vine to my wife, and the guy driving the tractor said "No problem, our people cut the ripe ones off in the mornings so y'all don't have to worry about that."
As we were searching the field for the perfect pumpkins, in drives a truck (I didn't realize until just then we were right by the road) with a bunch of teenagers and boxes on the back. The boxes were the same ones I had seen in the grocery store full of pumpkins from somewhere else, and the kids were dropping pumpkins from the boxes in amongst the vines. Really put the whole "Farm Market" thing into perspective.


We did a "U pick" pumpkin trip one year, I think it was like 20¢ / lbs. After getting the pumpkin we wandered up to the main building where the veggies were sold and at the front door were already picked pumpkins, 16¢ / lbs.
 
2012-07-08 07:16:38 PM
It's awesome - the best part is that the prices for locally grown organic food, thanks to the cost of shipping the tasteless, agribusiness-grown food across the country, is now almost competitive in pricing.

For example, organic celery, in both taste and appearance, rocks the socks off the pale, limp "bargain celery," and the price difference is negligible. Stir-frys and snacks have never been crunchier.
 
2012-07-08 08:03:05 PM

El Dudereno: HEB


csb time
if that location had skylights, I helped design their installation plan as a summer intern like 10 years ago
 
2012-07-08 08:29:54 PM

ChubbyTiger: pivazena: Ugh I WISH I could find organic food around here...

farking 50 ingredients for bread. BREAD. This place is hell.

for grocery store stuff, try Vermont Bread Company. Pretty damn good and mostly natural. Not the same as a good bakery, but nothing really is.


Ezekiel 4:9 bread is awesome, but I'm not sure how prevalent it is around the country.
 
2012-07-08 08:44:14 PM
I prefer fresh and local for the obvious reasons.

/use organic fertilizer in my garden because it works better
 
2012-07-08 09:50:10 PM
I'm generally not too picky about whether my food is organic or not, but I do avoid buying most nuts and vegetables. I stick to fruits and flowers, it's less cruel than devouring vital parts of the plant...more so when you consider how many plants produce fruits with the specific intention of being food for animals. I also won't eat seeds like peas and corn. If I ate meat, I wouldn't eat an animal fetus, so why would I do the same to a plant?
 
2012-07-08 09:54:30 PM

alwaysjaded: Personally, I like it. Around here, H.E.B. has been re-modeling all their stores to where it really takes some effort to get to the processed stuff. By the time I get to the center aisles, I have enough fresh stuff that I'm only hitting the middle shelves for stuff like olive oil or something.

I love their meat department since it's the only place to get grass fed beef around here. All the butchers around me admitted that they use the same stuff as commercial grade. At least the mexican butchers drown it in 100 different spices for good fajita meat.


There are other places to get grass fed beef, but HEB usually is the most convienent. I was told that we will be getting Sprouts in Houston, which is all organic.
 
2012-07-08 09:56:02 PM
Do they irradiate organic foods? Seems pretty stupid if they don't.
 
2012-07-08 10:35:23 PM

Torsoheap: ChubbyTiger: pivazena: Ugh I WISH I could find organic food around here...

farking 50 ingredients for bread. BREAD. This place is hell.

for grocery store stuff, try Vermont Bread Company. Pretty damn good and mostly natural. Not the same as a good bakery, but nothing really is.

Ezekiel 4:9 bread is awesome, but I'm not sure how prevalent it is around the country.


As long as they don't sell Ezekiel 23:20 bread, I will be ok.
 
2012-07-08 11:07:41 PM

vartian: Except that the organic label is so watered down that it means almost nothing now.

Go to farmers markets, buy things that actually look like food and learn to cook them.


Yup. I work in the high-end "organic" food market, and 95% of the stuff I see on availability lists is complete bullshiat. The ONLY way to know what you're eating is to control it from inception (seed or egg) to table or hunt and process it (meaning protein) yourself. That's it, everything else is HIGHLY suspect.

If you think places like Whole Foods and Trader Joe's aren't stocked with 90% chemically-enhanced bullshiat, you've got a LOT to learn. The label means NOTHING.
 
2012-07-08 11:11:52 PM
dried papaya

Ok, so what's so hippy/organic with dried papaya.

I'm from an island that has papaya everywhere, and now I'm in San Diego which rolls in a ton of papaya from mexico and south america (I have a papaya sitting in my kitchen right now). Dried papaya has been around for far longer than this current 'organic' fad. They were in trail mix (along with pieces of pineapple and slivers of coconut).

// I'll take my dried papaya with chile powder.
 
2012-07-08 11:12:38 PM
the biggest redneck here : Yup. I work in the high-end "organic" food market, and 95% of the stuff I see on availability lists is complete bullshiat. The ONLY way to know what you're eating

Says you

I KNOW what I'M eating!

/protons, neutrons and electrons
 
2012-07-09 06:51:03 AM

FormlessOne: It's awesome - the best part is that the prices for locally grown organic food, thanks to the cost of shipping the tasteless, agribusiness-grown food across the country, is now almost competitive in pricing.

For example, organic celery, in both taste and appearance, rocks the socks off the pale, limp "bargain celery," and the price difference is negligible. Stir-frys and snacks have never been crunchier.


There are 2 things that make that celery taste better, neither of which are about it being "organic":-

1. Time from picking to eating. The longer that takes, the more taste is lost
2. Varietal of the vegetable. Organic farming uses better, tastier, lower yield ones because it's a premium product.

None of the taste is about whether pesticides are used or not. None. I could grow celery that tastes just as good as what you're eating and it would not be "organic".

What happens with food companies is that a lot of them want to make premium products without cutting corners. And then, they're not far away from being organic, and if they take those few extra steps, they get an accreditation and some extra market. It's given people the impression that organic=more tasty when there is no evidence for that. The best bacon that I eat (from a small farm with free-range pigs) is inorganic. I've tried 3 organic varieties and none of them are as good.
 
2012-07-09 07:54:55 AM

drewsclues: WHERE IS YOUR FREE MARKET NOW?!?!


Working just fine, thanks.
 
2012-07-09 09:30:19 AM
Organic, All natural, all bullshiat.
 
2012-07-09 10:45:59 AM

MrHappyRotter: I'm generally not too picky about whether my food is organic or not, but I do avoid buying most nuts and vegetables. I stick to fruits and flowers, it's less cruel than devouring vital parts of the plant...more so when you consider how many plants produce fruits with the specific intention of being food for animals. I also won't eat seeds like peas and corn. If I ate meat, I wouldn't eat an animal fetus, so why would I do the same to a plant?


I hope you are trolling, for your sake. Not even Jainists are that looney or apparently that nutritionally deficient.
 
2012-07-09 10:49:29 AM

minoridiot: There are other places to get grass fed beef, but HEB usually is the most convienent. I was told that we will be getting Sprouts in Houston, which is all organic.


Sprouts is not all organic, but they call themselves a Farmers Market and they do have a great selection of produce (much of which is organic).
 
2012-07-09 11:09:14 AM

vartian: Except that the organic label is so watered down that it means almost nothing now.

Go to farmers markets, buy things that actually look like food and learn to cook them.


Most of the farmer's markets in my area are ran by Hmong, and they don't give a shiat what they spray on their crops as long as they
look good on the display tables.
 
2012-07-09 12:53:42 PM
Video blocked by a NewVision copyright claim.

For 3 minutes and 50 seconds of video that's obviously a parody.

Parody, which according to fair use laws, is fine and dandy.

In short

Fark NewVision.
 
2012-07-10 03:13:49 PM

Revek: I for one am tired of all the inorganic food they sell.


I'm more annoyed by the supernatural food.
 
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