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(The Atlantic)   Eleven ways bad math skills are hurting consumers   (theatlantic.com) divider line 125
    More: PSA, Williams-Sonoma, Megan McArdle, cup of coffee, maths, Dan Ariely  
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7026 clicks; posted to Business » on 07 Jul 2012 at 4:31 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-07 12:37:39 AM
Wife: Look what I bought!
Me: Did we need that?
Wife: Well, no... but it was on sale. 50% off.
Me: If you hadn't bought it, you could have saved 100%.
 
2012-07-07 12:51:52 AM
1. Lotteries
2. Casinos
3. Mortgages
4. Lotteries
5. Casinos
6. Mortgages
7. Payday loans
8. Payday loans
9. Payday loans
10. Lotteries
11. Tax breaks for the wealthy
 
2012-07-07 01:21:58 AM

Fark Me To Tears: Wife: Look what I bought!
Me: Did we need that?
Wife: Well, no... but it was on sale. 50% off.
Me: If you hadn't bought it, you could have saved 100%.


A smart shopper would have purchased 2.
 
2012-07-07 02:30:03 AM
I work on promotion calculators for retailers.I have spoken with clerks who tell me that a 33% off sale prompts customers to say, "But when are you guys have a buy one, get one for 50% off?" Our basic math skills are bad.
 
wee [TotalFark]
2012-07-07 05:11:07 AM
But the same person shopping for underwear is (research has shown, again and again) more likely to buy a product that ends in 9. Remember: Shopping is an attention game. Consumers aren't just hunting for products. They're hunting for clues that products are worth buying.

Not entirely true. I recently bought 24 pairs of socks. The reason is that I finally found some with the right mix of cotton to polyester/rubber/whatever. I had previously bought a couple pairs on spec -- as a test, basically -- and when (after washing them) found them to be chock full of the kind of cottony goodness I crave I went back and bought all of those socks that store had.

I put in an order for more, actually, and got a discount for doing so. I would have paid twice the price.

I really, actually do want to buy a certain thing, and not so much what a store might want me to pay attention to. It makes shopping very easy and quick: "Do they have this, and is it a good price? OK, then I'll buy it because that's what I came to shop for. No? Then perhaps Amazon Prime with its free shipping and no tax is cheaper. Or maybe I'll buy it later when it's on sale, if I happen to think about it."

Buying something because it has a perceived value -- or discount -- is stupid.
 
2012-07-07 05:11:53 AM

Marcus Aurelius: 3. Mortgages


I wouldn't go that far. Stupid mortgages that are rushed into without thinking of the long term, yes. But I'm very happy I'm in a position to service one for a roof over my head instead of renting.
 
2012-07-07 05:33:58 AM

wee: But the same person shopping for underwear is (research has shown, again and again) more likely to buy a product that ends in 9. Remember: Shopping is an attention game. Consumers aren't just hunting for products. They're hunting for clues that products are worth buying.

Not entirely true. I recently bought 24 pairs of socks. The reason is that I finally found some with the right mix of cotton to polyester/rubber/whatever. I had previously bought a couple pairs on spec -- as a test, basically -- and when (after washing them) found them to be chock full of the kind of cottony goodness I crave I went back and bought all of those socks that store had.

I put in an order for more, actually, and got a discount for doing so. I would have paid twice the price.

I really, actually do want to buy a certain thing, and not so much what a store might want me to pay attention to. It makes shopping very easy and quick: "Do they have this, and is it a good price? OK, then I'll buy it because that's what I came to shop for. No? Then perhaps Amazon Prime with its free shipping and no tax is cheaper. Or maybe I'll buy it later when it's on sale, if I happen to think about it."

Buying something because it has a perceived value -- or discount -- is stupid.


Get off my lawn
 
2012-07-07 05:52:55 AM
(10) We're obsessed with the number 9. Up to 65 percent of all retail prices end in the number 9.

Habit, mostly. The original intent was forcing a "this is cheap" idea on consumers, but most consumers now expect the "9" at the end of a price.

I read something a while back (can't find it right now) that suggested that people trigger on other numbers now - an ending "5" or an extra penny. Instead of $3.99 being the "cheap price," people see things like $3.95 or $4.01 as "oh, they discounted that sucker as much as possible."

There's also the single-digit price plan. Instead of listing "$3.99" above an item, stores just put "$4" on the sign. It's two digits cheaper! Oddly enough, I see this in both high and and low end restaurants.
 
wee [TotalFark]
2012-07-07 06:02:21 AM

tbhouston: Get off my lawn


Honestly... I live in Arizona. Even though my job isn't outdoors anymore, I can't handle socks with too much non-cotton in them (in the wrong places). So I find a pair, try them, find another brand, try them, repeat. Some fall apart. Some wear thin very quickly. Some won't stay up. This last batch? They're farking mustard, man.

So I bought every pair they had. I saved the bag from the first batch, so that I can buy more. Socks won't go stale and I'm farking tired of dealing with those inferior ones at a discount. If they don't work well, why deal with them? If you find ones that do work well, get them. Who gives a shiat if the price has a '9' in it, like the article says...

Yes, my dad taught me well. He grew up during The Depression. The man knew. You find a thing you know you'll need, at a good price, then get two. Also, don't ever buy cheap boots. I learned that one the hard way.

As an aside, and this might be middle age talking, putting on a pair of fresh cotton socks is farking magical, man...
 
2012-07-07 06:27:00 AM
12. Consumers believe everything they read on the internet.
 
2012-07-07 06:40:56 AM

thisispete: Marcus Aurelius: 3. Mortgages

I wouldn't go that far. Stupid mortgages that are rushed into without thinking of the long term, yes. But I'm very happy I'm in a position to service one for a roof over my head instead of renting.


Yup. Where I live there aren't very many nice houses available to rent at all, but you can buy a nice house in a decent neighborhood for cheap. My mortgage payment (including insurance and taxes) is 33% less than the rent we paid when we first moved here 2 years ago.
 
2012-07-07 07:14:21 AM
Yesterday I made my annual pilgrimage to Mc Donalds.

Me: "I'd like a Big Mac, small fries and small Orange Drink."
Clerk: "Would you like the Mc Deal Combo offer?"
Me: "No thanks. I'd like a Big Mac, small fries and small Orange Drink."

This went on for another minute.

Manager: "Can I help you?"
Me: "Yes, I would like a Big Mac, small fries and a small Orange Drink."
Manager: "Would you like the Big Mac Extra Value Meal?"

I left, went to the Seafood Market, bought 4 lobsters for $20 and while they were being cooked bought a rack of beer and rolls next door.

Lobster rolls for lunch today.

/Super-Sized
//no celery.
///I'm lovin' it.
 
zez
2012-07-07 07:39:03 AM
Am I the only one that expected there to be 10 items in the article?
 
2012-07-07 07:45:09 AM
FTFA: If you're buying a $400 item, for the overwhelming number of consumers that level of spending is not a risk you need to insure under any circumstances.

Tell that to all the people who buy $400 smartphones for next to nothing because of the subsidy and then act surprised when you tell them the replacement costs after they drop them and crack the screen. Add to that the idiots who do pay for insurance then never file a claim because of the deductible; it makes me want there to be a law banning phone subsidies so people know the actual cost of their equipment.
 
2012-07-07 07:51:34 AM

zez: Am I the only one that expected there to be 10 items in the article?


I was also expecting a non-11 number of items in the article.
/ you failed us, subby
 
2012-07-07 08:17:29 AM

adenosine: FTFA: If you're buying a $400 item, for the overwhelming number of consumers that level of spending is not a risk you need to insure under any circumstances.

Tell that to all the people who buy $400 smartphones for next to nothing because of the subsidy and then act surprised when you tell them the replacement costs after they drop them and crack the screen. Add to that the idiots who do pay for insurance then never file a claim because of the deductible; it makes me want there to be a law banning phone subsidies so people know the actual cost of their equipment.


Don't most warranties exclude "abuse" like dropping it or water damage?
 
2012-07-07 08:18:53 AM
In before the "I am too smart ..." swaggering and self-fellatio.

Yeah, yeah whatever. We're all too smart to fall for it and that's why retailers keep doing it.
 
2012-07-07 08:35:41 AM

wee: tbhouston: Get off my lawn

Honestly... I live in Arizona. Even though my job isn't outdoors anymore, I can't handle socks with too much non-cotton in them (in the wrong places). So I find a pair, try them, find another brand, try them, repeat. Some fall apart. Some wear thin very quickly. Some won't stay up. This last batch? They're farking mustard, man.

So I bought every pair they had. I saved the bag from the first batch, so that I can buy more. Socks won't go stale and I'm farking tired of dealing with those inferior ones at a discount. If they don't work well, why deal with them? If you find ones that do work well, get them. Who gives a shiat if the price has a '9' in it, like the article says...

Yes, my dad taught me well. He grew up during The Depression. The man knew. You find a thing you know you'll need, at a good price, then get two. Also, don't ever buy cheap boots. I learned that one the hard way.

As an aside, and this might be middle age talking, putting on a pair of fresh cotton socks is farking magical, man...


Would you just tell us the goddamn brand and style or UPC or whatever, goddammit?

/also a sock aficionado
 
2012-07-07 08:36:29 AM

Betep: This went on for another minute.


Why? It took a second to punch it in, but that's it.
 
2012-07-07 08:46:06 AM

wee: But the same person shopping for underwear is (research has shown, again and again) more likely to buy a product that ends in 9. Remember: Shopping is an attention game. Consumers aren't just hunting for products. They're hunting for clues that products are worth buying.

Not entirely true. I recently bought 24 pairs of socks. The reason is that I finally found some with the right mix of cotton to polyester/rubber/whatever. I had previously bought a couple pairs on spec -- as a test, basically -- and when (after washing them) found them to be chock full of the kind of cottony goodness I crave I went back and bought all of those socks that store had.

I put in an order for more, actually, and got a discount for doing so. I would have paid twice the price.

I really, actually do want to buy a certain thing, and not so much what a store might want me to pay attention to. It makes shopping very easy and quick: "Do they have this, and is it a good price? OK, then I'll buy it because that's what I came to shop for. No? Then perhaps Amazon Prime with its free shipping and no tax is cheaper. Or maybe I'll buy it later when it's on sale, if I happen to think about it."

Buying something because it has a perceived value -- or discount -- is stupid.


Wee from Scotsdale, can you tell us more about your recent purchase of socks?
 
2012-07-07 08:48:31 AM

wee: tbhouston: Get off my lawn

Honestly... I live in Arizona. Even though my job isn't outdoors anymore, I can't handle socks with too much non-cotton in them (in the wrong places). So I find a pair, try them, find another brand, try them, repeat. Some fall apart. Some wear thin very quickly. Some won't stay up. This last batch? They're farking mustard, man.

So I bought every pair they had. I saved the bag from the first batch, so that I can buy more. Socks won't go stale and I'm farking tired of dealing with those inferior ones at a discount. If they don't work well, why deal with them? If you find ones that do work well, get them. Who gives a shiat if the price has a '9' in it, like the article says...

Yes, my dad taught me well. He grew up during The Depression. The man knew. You find a thing you know you'll need, at a good price, then get two. Also, don't ever buy cheap boots. I learned that one the hard way.

As an aside, and this might be middle age talking, putting on a pair of fresh cotton socks is farking magical, man...


alrighty then!

There was an episode of X-Files (I think) where the killer said the same thing you just did. "Nothing like putting on a fresh pair of socks." Sat down in the dept. store and put on socks. Right before he came up firing, and they crossfire took him out.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-07-07 08:49:03 AM
We're heavily influenced by the first number.

One way people committing fraud give themselves away is using a uniform distribution of first digits in false entries instead of a uniform distribution of values. In real account books the first digit of a random expense is more likely to be "1" than "9".
 
2012-07-07 08:57:09 AM
We had a garage sale and toward the end of the day I said, let's get $20 more then stop. We put up a board that said something like '$20 more dollars to reach our goal.' '$18.75 to reach our goal.' $17.50 to reach our goal.' After we put up the board, every single person who stopped by bought something. You could tell some people were just trying to pick out something they could live with, and they all appeared to be happy to be helping. (Oh, they need to make the rent.) I felt dirty, like I had looked into marketing's Bucket of Truth.
 
2012-07-07 09:08:24 AM

starsrift: zez: Am I the only one that expected there to be 10 items in the article?

I was also expecting a non-11 number of items in the article.
/ you failed us, subby


That didn't occur to me, but I was expecting an article about math to actually be about math rather than psychology.
 
2012-07-07 09:21:08 AM

Marcus Aurelius: 1. Lotteries
2. Casinos
3. Mortgages
4. Lotteries
5. Casinos
6. Mortgages
7. Payday loans
8. Payday loans
9. Payday loans
10. Lotteries
11. Tax breaks for the wealthy


You know how I know you're not very smart?
 
2012-07-07 09:33:16 AM
Interesting stuff, but almost nothing to do with math or innumeracy, and lots to do with psychology.

People in general, and Farkers especially, seem to be profoundly reluctant to accept that our brains are physical organs with physical limitations. They have limits of memory, of attention, of retention, of recall; and consequently we do not make most decisions based on cold, rational, analysis. There just aren't enough hours in the day to live life that way.

Blaming people for the shortcomings or their brains makes as much sense as blaming them for not winning the Boston Marathon. You can't overcome physical boundaries by sheer force of will.

Oh, except for you, Mr. About-To-Reply-Farker. You're exceptional, of course.
 
2012-07-07 09:40:33 AM

Marcus Aurelius: 1. Lotteries
2. Casinos
3. Mortgages
4. Lotteries
5. Casinos
6. Mortgages
7. Payday loans
8. Payday loans
9. Payday loans
10. Lotteries
11. Tax breaks for the wealthy


I don't agree with the mortgages on a general note. There are times that taking on a fairly large debt can be good, like when making a purchase of a house where you and your family will live for a number of years. Mortgages got a bad name with the whole sub-prime mess and the house flippers.
 
2012-07-07 09:44:54 AM
When I troll the Mac and Cheese lane at the grocery store (daughter loves her M&C) they had a 12 ounce box for, say $2.10. They also had the "family" size 24 ounce box for $4.25. Say what? The family size boxes were selling out yet the regular size boxes were not.

A box exactly double the size is more than double the price and people don't know enough to do basic math so the stores count on this.

Phineas and Ferb Mac and Cheese FTW.

We're doomed...
 
2012-07-07 09:47:13 AM

Betep: Yesterday I made my annual pilgrimage to Mc Donalds.

Me: "I'd like a Big Mac, small fries and small Orange Drink."
Clerk: "Would you like the Mc Deal Combo offer?"
Me: "No thanks. I'd like a Big Mac, small fries and small Orange Drink."

This went on for another minute.

Manager: "Can I help you?"
Me: "Yes, I would like a Big Mac, small fries and a small Orange Drink."
Manager: "Would you like the Big Mac Extra Value Meal?"

I left, went to the Seafood Market, bought 4 lobsters for $20 and while they were being cooked bought a rack of beer and rolls next door.

Lobster rolls for lunch today.

/Super-Sized
//no celery.
///I'm lovin' it.


He may have actually been trying to save you money (even if you don't eat everything). But at least you went and spent 4x as much somewhere else.

/maybe McDonald's isn't for you
 
2012-07-07 09:51:20 AM

zez: Am I the only one that expected there to be 10 items in the article?


I was hoping for a super-size to 14 for just the price of 12
 
2012-07-07 09:58:10 AM

Enormous-Schwanstucker: When I troll the Mac and Cheese lane at the grocery store (daughter loves her M&C) they had a 12 ounce box for, say $2.10. They also had the "family" size 24 ounce box for $4.25. Say what? The family size boxes were selling out yet the regular size boxes were not.

A box exactly double the size is more than double the price and people don't know enough to do basic math so the stores count on this..


I experienced this just the other day. I was buying chocolate chips for baking and saw that they had 12oz bags for something like $2.50, or a 24oz bag on sale for $6. I laughed and bought 2 smaller bags.
 
2012-07-07 10:15:30 AM
Betep:
Yesterday I made my annual pilgrimage to Mc Donalds.

Me: "I'd like a Big Mac, small fries and small Orange Drink."
Clerk: "Would you like the Mc Deal Combo offer?"
Me: "No thanks. I'd like a Big Mac, small fries and small Orange Drink."

This went on for another minute.


I'm calling BS.

Cashiers at Mickey D's aren't trained to push "deals" on people like that - it slows down the line and makes people angry. They ask once, and then punch in what you ordered, if it's unusual.

They also haven't offered the McDeal Combo for about six years now. They're "Extra Value Meals" nowadays, and the basic Extra Value Meal is exactly what you claimed to be ordering (sandwich, fries, drink). They ring that up and don't even bother telling you that's what you got.
 
2012-07-07 10:17:50 AM

cirby: (10) We're obsessed with the number 9. Up to 65 percent of all retail prices end in the number 9.

Habit, mostly. The original intent was forcing a "this is cheap" idea on consumers, but most consumers now expect the "9" at the end of a price.

I read something a while back (can't find it right now) that suggested that people trigger on other numbers now - an ending "5" or an extra penny. Instead of $3.99 being the "cheap price," people see things like $3.95 or $4.01 as "oh, they discounted that sucker as much as possible."
.


I've taken pains to price everything to the nearest .99 on my Amazon dealer listigns and it's worked for the better.
 
2012-07-07 10:20:07 AM

UDel_Kitty: Enormous-Schwanstucker: When I troll the Mac and Cheese lane at the grocery store (daughter loves her M&C) they had a 12 ounce box for, say $2.10. They also had the "family" size 24 ounce box for $4.25. Say what? The family size boxes were selling out yet the regular size boxes were not.

A box exactly double the size is more than double the price and people don't know enough to do basic math so the stores count on this..

I experienced this just the other day. I was buying chocolate chips for baking and saw that they had 12oz bags for something like $2.50, or a 24oz bag on sale for $6. I laughed and bought 2 smaller bags.


I think this plays a lot off of the consumer ed classes they had (have?) in high school and middle school, where one of the things they tell you is to look to buy in bulk because it can be cheaper. Of course, many people being idiots forget the important math bits and so ignore smaller packages at a lower per-gram/liter/whatever price in a misguided attempt to be thrifty. Also, sometimes, at places like Costco or Sam's Club, people buy massive freaking crates of, say, cookies, and never get around to eating them all before they go stale--so they spent much more money than they needed to based on how much they actually consumed. Marketing people are both evil and monstrously intelligent, but sometimes people practically do their job for them.
 
2012-07-07 10:38:01 AM

cirby: Betep:
Yesterday I made my annual pilgrimage to Mc Donalds.

Me: "I'd like a Big Mac, small fries and small Orange Drink."
Clerk: "Would you like the Mc Deal Combo offer?"
Me: "No thanks. I'd like a Big Mac, small fries and small Orange Drink."

This went on for another minute.

I'm calling BS.

Cashiers at Mickey D's aren't trained to push "deals" on people like that - it slows down the line and makes people angry. They ask once, and then punch in what you ordered, if it's unusual.

They also haven't offered the McDeal Combo for about six years now. They're "Extra Value Meals" nowadays, and the basic Extra Value Meal is exactly what you claimed to be ordering (sandwich, fries, drink). They ring that up and don't even bother telling you that's what you got.


get-attorneys.com
 
2012-07-07 10:42:13 AM
FTFA:(9) ... but we're weird about rebates and warranties.

"[Warranties] make no rational sense," Harvard economist David Cutler told the Washington Post. "The implied probability that [a product] will break has to be substantially greater than the risk that you can't afford to fix it or replace it. If you're buying a $400 item, for the overwhelming number of consumers that level of spending is not a risk you need to insure under any circumstances."


I just bought an iPad, I paid for the $50 warranty. I've got 4 children under 6 years old. I'm less angry when they draw on it with crayon (true story)
 
2012-07-07 10:45:10 AM
Shiat, I think I fall for this one too often

People were offered 2 kinds of beer: premium beer for $2.50 and bargain beer for $1.80. Around 80% chose the more expensive beer. Now a third beer was introduced, a super bargain beer for $1.60 in addition to the previous two. Now 80% bought the $1.80 beer and the rest $2.50 beer. Nobody bought the cheapest option.

Third time around, they removed the $1.60 beer and replaced with a super premium $3.40 beer. Most people chose the $2.50 beer, a small number $1.80 beer and around 10% opted for the most expensive $3.40 beer.
 
2012-07-07 10:47:01 AM

TheWalrus469: Also, sometimes, at places like Costco or Sam's Club, people buy massive freaking crates of, say, cookies, and never get around to eating them all before they go stale--so they spent much more money than they needed to based on how much they actually consumed.


Cookies can go bad? Like if you don't eat them all in the first couple of days? I don't think I've ever had cookies go bad.

/I sound fat.
 
2012-07-07 10:48:06 AM
I'm a savvy consumer because I read the Consumerist. Did you know that grocery stores put older milk in front and place the good milk in back? It's true! Grocery stores are ripping us off!

/Thanks, Consumerist!
 
2012-07-07 10:50:08 AM
In college I once got a mailer from the local pizza place - and I really wish I would have saved it - that advertised a medium one topping pizza for $9.99, then right next it to a medium one topping pizza and FREE BREADSTICKS for $10.99. Oh those restaurants and their tricky maths.
 
2012-07-07 10:58:17 AM

Mayhem of the Black Underclass: FTFA:(9) ... but we're weird about rebates and warranties.

"[Warranties] make no rational sense," Harvard economist David Cutler told the Washington Post. "The implied probability that [a product] will break has to be substantially greater than the risk that you can't afford to fix it or replace it. If you're buying a $400 item, for the overwhelming number of consumers that level of spending is not a risk you need to insure under any circumstances."

I just bought an iPad, I paid for the $50 warranty. I've got 4 children under 6 years old. I'm less angry when they draw on it with crayon (true story)


Couldn't you keep it out of their reach, teach them to not touch it, bout a removable screen protector?
 
2012-07-07 11:04:48 AM
I have killed 4 of the current gen iPod nano's in the past 21 months. The extended warranty from Apple has been well worth it.

Now to see if they offer me the extended warranty again when this one dies.
 
2012-07-07 11:06:10 AM
Highest margin items at a restaurant are usually the chicken dishes. But if you like chicken then go for it.

/got nuthin
 
2012-07-07 11:10:48 AM

beango12: In college I once got a mailer from the local pizza place - and I really wish I would have saved it - that advertised a medium one topping pizza for $9.99, then right next it to a medium one topping pizza and FREE BREADSTICKS for $10.99. Oh those restaurants and their tricky maths.


Don't knock it. Bistromathics is much safer than the infinite improbability drive.
 
2012-07-07 11:15:37 AM

wee: tbhouston: Get off my lawn

Honestly... I live in Arizona. Even though my job isn't outdoors anymore, I can't handle socks with too much non-cotton in them (in the wrong places). So I find a pair, try them, find another brand, try them, repeat. Some fall apart. Some wear thin very quickly. Some won't stay up. This last batch? They're farking mustard, man.

So I bought every pair they had. I saved the bag from the first batch, so that I can buy more. Socks won't go stale and I'm farking tired of dealing with those inferior ones at a discount. If they don't work well, why deal with them? If you find ones that do work well, get them. Who gives a shiat if the price has a '9' in it, like the article says...

Yes, my dad taught me well. He grew up during The Depression. The man knew. You find a thing you know you'll need, at a good price, then get two. Also, don't ever buy cheap boots. I learned that one the hard way.

As an aside, and this might be middle age talking, putting on a pair of fresh cotton socks is farking magical, man...


Amen. I've been buying my socks from a Korean lady at the farmer's market for a few years now. American made, high cotton content, green toe so I can sort them easier, and they come in the 9-11 size which fits me better than 10-13.
 
2012-07-07 11:19:16 AM

Aar1012: Mayhem of the Black Underclass: FTFA:(9) ... but we're weird about rebates and warranties.

"[Warranties] make no rational sense," Harvard economist David Cutler told the Washington Post. "The implied probability that [a product] will break has to be substantially greater than the risk that you can't afford to fix it or replace it. If you're buying a $400 item, for the overwhelming number of consumers that level of spending is not a risk you need to insure under any circumstances."

I just bought an iPad, I paid for the $50 warranty. I've got 4 children under 6 years old. I'm less angry when they draw on it with crayon (true story)

Couldn't you keep it out of their reach, teach them to not touch it, bout a removable screen protector?


I'm sorry, I didn't make it clear, that this is an educational tool for them to use, to learn to read, to do maths with and to play games on.
Keeping it out of their reach would defeat the purpose.
 
2012-07-07 11:19:25 AM

Aar1012: Mayhem of the Black Underclass: FTFA:(9) ... but we're weird about rebates and warranties.

"[Warranties] make no rational sense," Harvard economist David Cutler told the Washington Post. "The implied probability that [a product] will break has to be substantially greater than the risk that you can't afford to fix it or replace it. If you're buying a $400 item, for the overwhelming number of consumers that level of spending is not a risk you need to insure under any circumstances."

I just bought an iPad, I paid for the $50 warranty. I've got 4 children under 6 years old. I'm less angry when they draw on it with crayon (true story)

Couldn't you keep it out of their reach, teach them to not touch it, bout a removable screen protector?


*points and laughs*
 
2012-07-07 11:22:29 AM

UDel_Kitty: I experienced this just the other day. I was buying chocolate chips for baking and saw that they had 12oz bags for something like $2.50, or a 24oz bag on sale for $6. I laughed and bought 2 smaller bags.


Don't attribute to ignorance what is most likely laziness.

"I need about this many chocolate chips for what I'm baking." *grabs 24oz bag* -end scene-

Notice there was no price comparison there. Is it wasteful? Sure. Is it understandable? Definitely. When you're not pinching pennies, it can be liberating to just buy wtf you want at the grocery store. Pennies be damned!
 
2012-07-07 11:23:49 AM
you spot an awesome watch for $367. Compared to a Timex, that's wildly over-expensive...

Actually Timex makes large assortment of watches in the $300 range.
 
2012-07-07 11:24:33 AM
I find the supermarket psychology fascinating myself. The soft music to lull you into a slower pace. The longer your'e in the store the more you buy. The displays in the aisles you have to maneuver around, slows you down.
Always the highest priced items are at eye level, same stuff lower price on the bottom shelves. Usually the bread, milk, and produce are at one of the four corners in the store. End cap displays are not always you best buys either.
 
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