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(The Atlantic)   Pictures of the inside of the CERN lab. It looks like the Death Star   (theatlantic.com ) divider line 85
    More: Cool, Death Star, CERN, Standard Model, Nuclear Physics, fiber-optics, Peter Higgs, LHC, higgs particles  
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8778 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Jul 2012 at 8:13 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-07 01:09:47 AM  
Gathered here are images from the construction of the massive $4-billion-dollar machine that allowed us peer so closely into the subatomic world

That works out to about 12 F-35C's.

Nice to know how we value our universe so highly.

God must LOVE us.
 
2012-07-07 01:09:57 AM  
It really bugged me that TFA's Author added thise *twice*! :" popularly known as the "God particle" -- that helps explain what gives all matter in the universe size and shape. "

A) I don't think it's a popular name
and
B) it's a meaningless name.

There was no reason to add it once, much less twice.
 
2012-07-07 01:11:10 AM  

Jamdug!: This looks like it is one of the most expensive projects in human history, which begs the question: who funded all this?


25.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-07-07 01:11:55 AM  

lohphat: jtown: [cdn.theatlantic.com image 640x421]

I like how they keep the controls simple.

Why is the OFF button protected!!??!ow

[smrtdsgn.com image 599x755]


I'm so glad I'm not the only one fixated on that. Seriously, WTF?

Also, just because I'm curious.... billions of dollars in funding and years in planning and build- BUT I imagine it was almost entirely designed, configured, and purposed very specifically by scientists long before engineers could get their hands on it and turn it into a total clusterfark. Sounds like a dream job if there isn't a change order every other day.

Also cool to see that our latest technological achievement is held together with flash tape and tie-wraps.

/ Dilbert sucks. Take those stupid cartoons off of your damn cubicle walls.
 
2012-07-07 01:20:56 AM  

Jamdug!: This looks like it is one of the most expensive projects in human history, which begs the question: who funded all this?


Socialism. It gets shiat done.
 
2012-07-07 02:20:26 AM  

redonkulon: The researchers use it at night to warm up their burrito's. Nothing like munching on newly formed subatomic particles to spice things up.


That is a seriously big burrito, but shouldn't they take it out of the foil before they put it in the microwave? I thought these guys were supposed to be smart.
 
2012-07-07 02:29:59 AM  

loonatic112358: fusillade762: The 2nd pic looks more like the rebel base on Hoth. And is that a GHOST?!?

[cdn.theatlantic.com image 640x400]

timetraveler here to document the historic event, the camera happened to snap them as they left this locus


Only 2 comments on the "ghost"? I thought Farkers were observant. I only showed up looking for an explanation..

*sigh*
 
2012-07-07 02:43:48 AM  

omeganuepsilon: loonatic112358: fusillade762: The 2nd pic looks more like the rebel base on Hoth. And is that a GHOST?!?

[cdn.theatlantic.com image 640x400]

timetraveler here to document the historic event, the camera happened to snap them as they left this locus

Only 2 comments on the "ghost"? I thought Farkers were observant. I only showed up looking for an explanation..

*sigh*


My guess would be a really long exposure and he happens to be the only thing moving in the shot. Just a guess, though.
 
2012-07-07 03:40:55 AM  
If they wanted cool collisions, instead of a loop, they should have set up a figure-eight track.

/what color was the Higgs Boson?
 
2012-07-07 04:20:00 AM  

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: If they wanted cool collisions, instead of a loop, they should have set up a figure-eight track.

/what color was the Higgs Boson?


Yeah, it needs a loop and a jump as well.

Shoulda painted the track orange.
 
2012-07-07 05:37:16 AM  
Union trooper run the place.

mypetjawa.mu.nu
 
2012-07-07 05:47:07 AM  

Grable's Future Son-in-Law: lohphat: jtown: [cdn.theatlantic.com image 640x421]

I like how they keep the controls simple.

Why is the OFF button protected!!??!ow

[smrtdsgn.com image 599x755]

I'm so glad I'm not the only one fixated on that. Seriously, WTF?

Also, just because I'm curious.... billions of dollars in funding and years in planning and build- BUT I imagine it was almost entirely designed, configured, and purposed very specifically by scientists long before engineers the accountants and MBA's could get their hands on it and turn it into a total clusterfark. Sounds like a dream job if there isn't a change order every other day.

Also cool to see that our latest technological achievement is held together with flash tape and tie-wraps.

/ Dilbert sucks. Take those stupid cartoons off of your damn cubicle walls.


Fixed it for you.


I expect the reason why the off button is protected is that every smash uses the electricity a medium sized town needs. You don't want to accidentaly wast that much juce because you lent on the btton trying to impress a journalist.
 
2012-07-07 06:14:39 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-07-07 06:38:13 AM  

Grable's Future Son-in-Law: I'm so glad I'm not the only one fixated on that. Seriously, WTF?


I'm not sure if it's the "oh crap, dump the beam" button or the normal "power off" button, but if it's the former then the system needs to dissipate a huge amount of energy: the LHC beam dumps must absorb 362 megajoules in 90 microseconds, which equals a power of 4 terawatts. The beam dumps need to absorb that amount of energy and dissipate it as harmlessly as possible. With those energies, it's likely to produce all sorts of nasty crap like radioactive particles, high-energy neutrons, etc. Not fun, and it's quite possible to break expensive stuff.

I imagine the computer has all sorts of sensors to detect when things are going wrong and dump the beams automatically, but it's also nice to have a Big Red Button.
 
2012-07-07 07:06:51 AM  

KoolerThanJesus: Just to state the obvious, but clearly quite a few really smart people were involved in this.


Except for Eddie. farking Eddie.
 
2012-07-07 07:11:49 AM  
i911.photobucket.com
 
2012-07-07 07:43:10 AM  

jtown: I like how they keep the controls simple.


images.wikia.com

If you want to start it, press Start. You can work out the rest of the controls for yourself.
 
2012-07-07 08:52:12 AM  
Oh, as a side-project they also invented the World Wide Web at CERN.

Thanks, Sir Tim!
 
2012-07-07 09:35:11 AM  
img.photobucket.com

/coincidence?
//I think not .....
 
2012-07-07 11:21:21 AM  

heypete:

I'm not sure if it's the "oh crap, dump the beam" button or the normal "power off" button, but if it's the former then the system needs to dissipate a huge amount of energy: the LHC beam dumps must absorb 362 megajoules in 90 microseconds, which equals a power of 4 terawatts. The beam dumps need to absorb that amount of energy and dissipate it as harmlessly as possible. With those energies, it's likely to produce all sorts of nasty crap like radioactive particles, high-energy neutrons, etc. Not fun, and it's quite possible to break expensive stuff.

I imagine the computer has all sorts of sensors to detect when things are going wrong and dump the beams automatically, but it's also nice to have a Big Red Button.


Wow. Great post. Makes much more sense now. Thanks!

Norfolking Chance:

Also, just because I'm curious.... billions of dollars in funding and years in planning and build- BUT I imagine it was almost entirely designed, configured, and purposed very specifically by scientists long before engineers the accountants and MBA's could get their hands on it and turn it into a total clusterfark. Sounds like a dream job if there isn't a change order every other day.

Also cool to see that our latest technological achievement is held together with flash tape and tie-wraps.

/ Dilbert sucks. Take those stupid cartoons off of your damn cubicle walls.

Fixed it for you.


Refixed that. Trust me. Don't blameshift.
 
2012-07-07 11:34:41 AM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: Jamdug!: This looks like it is one of the most expensive projects in human history, which begs the question: who funded all this?

[25.media.tumblr.com image 320x246]


Lol, that dude has cash!
 
2012-07-07 12:08:02 PM  

Jamdug!: Uchiha_Cycliste: Jamdug!: This looks like it is one of the most expensive projects in human history, which begs the question: who funded all this?

[25.media.tumblr.com image 320x246]

Lol, that dude has cash!


No, you silly silly man. Aliens! Aliens funded the project.
 
2012-07-07 01:06:55 PM  
i heard this happens when you press the button.

blogs.evtrib.com
 
2012-07-07 01:55:12 PM  
#26. That's my La Fiesta Burrito, going in for final warming.
 
2012-07-07 03:58:09 PM  

loonatic112358: SJKebab: The electronic schematics would be indecipherable in any of those eras. I'd guess that the way the hardware is being used in the detectors would be equally indecipherable, but I wouldn't bet on it for the 1930s though.

Depends on if they bring Tesla in


Oooooh yes. Dieselpunk :D (or more like, Teslapunk?).

Doctor Jan Itor: Union trooper run the place.

[mypetjawa.mu.nu image 570x375]


Why, you stuck up, half-witted, scruffy-looking Nerf herder.
 
2012-07-07 04:04:17 PM  

Jamdug!: This looks like it is one of the most expensive projects in human history, which begs raises the question: who funded all this?


FTFEveryone
 
2012-07-07 05:39:06 PM  

fusillade762: omeganuepsilon: loonatic112358: fusillade762: The 2nd pic looks more like the rebel base on Hoth. And is that a GHOST?!?

[cdn.theatlantic.com image 640x400]

timetraveler here to document the historic event, the camera happened to snap them as they left this locus

Only 2 comments on the "ghost"? I thought Farkers were observant. I only showed up looking for an explanation..

*sigh*

My guess would be a really long exposure and he happens to be the only thing moving in the shot. Just a guess, though.


I'd actually guess the opposite: that he's the only one who stood still long enough to get captured (partially) in the final image. The earliest photographs of street scenes seemed to show few or no people. The streets imaged were actually full of people, but only the ones who stopped moving for long periods got captured in the final image. It's a property of slow film to retain more permanent information preferentially to more transient information, so the static background is more likely to be captured than objects moving across it.
 
2012-07-07 06:05:24 PM  

lohphat: Meanwhile in Amerika we can't maintain our infrastructure, upgrade our rail systems, repair our roads, and have to hitch rides on Russian rockets to get into space.

We've forgotten how to lead the modern developed world.

Unless you're talking about per capita healthcare costs, percentage of population in prisons, and low taxes for rich people.

The US Super Collider we would have built was cut by congress.

The US government set the goal for the moon and the US lead the world in aerospace and high-paying engineers expanding the middle class.

Now we just have service workers and are discouraged from innovating anything by the patent system.

USA! USA! USA!


This just might be one of the smartest things ever written on Fark. Sad, but it is a reality that is getting worse and worse.
 
2012-07-07 06:10:59 PM  
The other problem is there are plenty of people in our great country who would would consider something like this to be a complete waste of time and resources.
 
2012-07-07 06:33:11 PM  

Big_Doofus: The other problem is there are plenty of people in our great country who would would consider something like this to be a complete waste of time and resources.


That is actually a valid opinion.

Science for sciences sake isn't very useful or relevant to many of societies current problems, and may not be for decades or centuries, if ever.

This discovery has so little to do with everyone's daily lives and the social problems of today, like welfare, catholic priests molesting kids, vaccines causing autism, etc etc etc. This discovery is not relevant to those things, and will not be relevant to anything even remotely associated with those things for decades or centuries, if ever.

It's a matter of priorities, which boils down to morals, and how what everyone thinks life should be like is a different thing.

No less valid than your love of pizza or dislike of veggies. It's an opinion, and in a sense, cannot be wrong, ever.

It's your opinion that it's a problem, and is just as valid as their opinion of you being the problem when it comes to the national healthcare system(or whatever topic of choice).
 
2012-07-07 06:52:02 PM  
Meanwhile, in America, morons are stocking up on ammo to prepare for a zombie holocaust they actually believe is coming.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/06/11/zombie_bullets/
 
2012-07-07 08:12:51 PM  

omeganuepsilon: Big_Doofus: The other problem is there are plenty of people in our great country who would would consider something like this to be a complete waste of time and resources.

That is actually a valid opinion.

Science for sciences sake isn't very useful or relevant to many of societies current problems, and may not be for decades or centuries, if ever.


Neither was the moon landing program but it spired innovation and employment and a middle class and a tax base that allowed us to progress as a society.

The LHC will bring innovation in communication, material, science, medicine, and other industries because it moves us forward in knowledge about the world around us.

Your shallow conservative view is why this country is mired in ignorance and fear of the unknown and unexplored. That is exactly what we need to boost the economy.
 
2012-07-07 08:48:59 PM  

lohphat: Your shallow conservative view is why this country is mired in ignorance and fear of the unknown and unexplored.


Speaking of shallow minded, I never claimed it was my view. I was just explaining that it's not some invalid fallacy, but more simply a different view of priorities.

Yes, the moon landing was inspiring. That this hasn't been is not an indication of society getting less intelligent, but that society is less awed at technology. We're no longer the savages that we once were, so in a sense, it's an indication that society is more intelligent. We've acclimated to breakthroughs, and they're no longer mesmerising. That's a good thing, unless you really don't want to know how magnets work because you enjoy the euphoria that comes with wonderment.

Also, I am not being confrontational here. I'm actually on the side of understanding other people, you're the one miring the situation in vitrolic speech and promoting ignorance and fear by way of not examining why people don't care, or why they think the funds could be spent elsewhere.
Please take your fundamentalist-type anger elsewhere.

Just incase you're able to calm down, let me explain it this way. It "might" be something that's beneficial to human kind in the near future, it "might" take generations. But there are things we could do instead of investing in science on that level that would yield more immediately useful information.

If you're starving now, you don't start farming, you won't survive the growth cycle. You do that after you've secured enough food to live for a while.
If you're broke right now, you don't go out and gamble what little you do have.

It's not fear and ignorance, nor is it conservative, to hold such an view. It's just (un)common sense.

Personally, I think we're far enough along to have some time and resources to spare, but I won't vilify people who think differently, because society does have some rather large problems that would benefit from a little bit of intelligence and effort. Some of these things do continually fall by the way side and get progressively worse.

Take off the rose colored glasses.
It's not "conservative" by way of politics to care more about what is in front of your face than fantasize about what might come of a scientific discovery, it's survival instinct. Care for yourself, then for your offspring until they can themselves, then your neighbor, and if that doesn't fill your day, then care for the future.

Is's that whole neighbor part that too many people like you lose sight of. What you don't seem to get, is that when people don't get along, they eventually become a threat to you and your offspring. It's also of benefit because you're not immune to falling down and injuring yourself, odds are it will happen at some point in time.

We still can't educate our kids worth a shiat, and you think people are mired in ignorance and fear for wanting to deal with that issue instead of wondering how to build a better TV.

That's the definition of shallow, you've just got a different set of tastes and criteria for your status.
 
2012-07-08 02:58:47 AM  

omeganuepsilon: Big_Doofus: The other problem is there are plenty of people in our great country who would would consider something like this to be a complete waste of time and resources.

That is actually a valid opinion.

Science for sciences sake isn't very useful or relevant to many of societies current problems, and may not be for decades or centuries, if ever.

This discovery has so little to do with everyone's daily lives and the social problems of today, like welfare, catholic priests molesting kids, vaccines causing autism, etc etc etc. This discovery is not relevant to those things, and will not be relevant to anything even remotely associated with those things for decades or centuries, if ever.

It's a matter of priorities, which boils down to morals, and how what everyone thinks life should be like is a different thing.

No less valid than your love of pizza or dislike of veggies. It's an opinion, and in a sense, cannot be wrong, ever.

It's your opinion that it's a problem, and is just as valid as their opinion of you being the problem when it comes to the national healthcare system(or whatever topic of choice).


Makes me think back to a time when someone built a sail to prove the wind.
 
2012-07-08 01:37:27 PM  

Ronnie_Zman: Jamdug!: This looks like it is one of the most expensive projects in human history, which begs raises the question: who funded all this?

FTFEveryone


What is the difference?
 
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