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(Humans Invent)   Social design in antisocial times   (humansinvent.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, Social welfare in Canada  
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2622 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Jul 2012 at 9:44 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-06 09:48:52 AM  
Oh, that's going to be an intersting website to wander through

I think I'll put on my iGoogle, fark what was I thinking
 
2012-07-06 10:03:11 AM  
I was too antisocial to accept their cookie policy, so I didn't get to read the article.

/At least they asked, which was nice.
 
2012-07-06 10:25:08 AM  
Translation: Too clever by half artEEst makes coffee cups nobody will buy.
 
2012-07-06 11:00:38 AM  

SpectroBoy: Translation: Too clever by half artEEst makes coffee cups nobody will buy.


Pretty much. The reason we've adopted the social conventions we now use in our daily routines is by and large due to convenience (efficiency). Admittedly, tea time isn't supposed to be an "efficient" affair, but how many people actually sit down for formal "tea time" anymore?

We wouldn't be becoming less social if we didn't want to.
 
2012-07-06 11:13:25 AM  
cdn.humansinvent.com.s3.amazonaws.com
Poundbury is the vision of Prince Charles for modern living.

this is why we can`t have nice things and also why we should scrap the monarchy...
 
2012-07-06 11:28:50 AM  
They can call me when they design a good website.


/most of the content I saw was WAY too fawning, uncritical, and annoying

//no, I mean the critical-thinking kind of "uncritical"
 
2012-07-06 11:50:50 AM  

grinding_journalist: SpectroBoy: Translation: Too clever by half artEEst makes coffee cups nobody will buy.

Pretty much. The reason we've adopted the social conventions we now use in our daily routines is by and large due to convenience (efficiency). Admittedly, tea time isn't supposed to be an "efficient" affair, but how many people actually sit down for formal "tea time" anymore?

We wouldn't be becoming less social if we didn't want to.


I disagree. We are encouraged by external factors to be less social than we otherwise would choose to be. Remove the "modern" influences and step back into any early society and you will see a much higher degree of social interaction and cooperation. Some of this was by necessity, of course, but by most studies and accounts it creates a much happier set of individuals. Some of these factors are talked about in the article, but others include how much our entertainment reinforces the whole "stranger=danger" concept. Marketers and advertisers (along with entertainment creators) benefit from this concept as it keeps us isolated. When we are isolated, we feel as though there is a hole that needs filling. Products, T.V. and other various forms of entertainment are there to offer us a temporary fix, helping to distract us from the fact that we are do not have community on it's most basic level. It's a vicious cycle that leaves us feeling more connected to people on reality TV than our next door neighbors.

Being efficient doesn't make us happy. We get one life; this is it. Why bother worrying about convenience and productivity if we aren't also making ourselves and those around us happier? To what end is life if not to be happy and at peace? Community, social interconnection and interaction are conditions of happiness. The point I am trying to make is that we are conditions by a lot of various forces to think that being communal is weird, outlandish and even a little cult-ish. We see people who place a high degree of importance on community as quaint and out of touch". However, having lived both in the "modern world" and in a far more community oriented environment, I can personally attest that for myself and those around me, there was a much higher degree of happiness and satisfaction in the communal environment. This evidence is anecdotal and entirely based on my personal experience, but it is all I personally need. There are many wonderful things that modern life has to offer, but it needs to be balanced out with what our natures. That is up to us to seek out and find... but when we do, we are usually the better for it.
 
2012-07-06 12:59:56 PM  

Dughan: Remove the "modern" influences and step back into any early society and you will see a much higher degree of social interaction and cooperation


By and large, I agree with your wall of text- but this statement renders your argument moot.

Modern life *demands* efficiency, at least in America. Yes, I have little doubt of the satisfaction you'd receive living, working, and bonding with a "retro" community (Amish, Mennonite, etc) that eschews the hectic day-to-day of modern life. Thing is, to be a part of any culture, you kind of need to "sync" with the pace that that culture exists in. Sure, if I had the time, I'd have breakfast on my back porch every day (real breakfast, not just some bar I've unwrapped), I'd chat with my neighbor about the news in that day's paper while to dogs roamed the backyard, and I'd conduct my business during the day by hand-delivering documents and reports to those who needed them, so that I could establish a face-to-face relationship with them. Unfortunately, my employer requires that these tasks be accomplished in a more streamlined manner, so he's not paying me to drive around and chat with people. As such, I'll check my email on my phone while to dogs are in the backyard and I'm having a fruit smoothie, I'll listen to my newsreader over my car stereo on my way to work, and I'll have the days dox to who need them by 10am using email, phone, and fax.

Would I be "happier" if I lived in Cali on a pot farm with 2 dozen other people I liked working and living with, eating good, unprocessed food, drinking un-chemical'd water, and rising and falling with the sun and the sweat of my brow? Almost certainly.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to go play the latest Skyrim DLC, and buy my pre-sale ticket for DKR.
 
2012-07-06 02:23:15 PM  

grinding_journalist: Now if you'll excuse me, I need to go play the latest Skyrim DLC, and buy my pre-sale ticket for DKR.


To continue the dialogue, I'll point to this as an example of what I mean.

When you do have the time to savor moments of slowness in life and to cultivate social interaction with others, you are participating in an entirely insular activity. Obviously other people are too busy and going to fast to really have the time to join you for a cup of coffee or a sandwich even if you were of a mind, I'd wager. It is a societal issue that works to the benefit of a select few. Many jobs require a person to be so "burned out" by the end of the day they want nothing more than to be mind-numbed. If we have less time to really communicate, if we have less community, we are less likely to organize, we are less likely to create alternatives to the current structure of things. Both business and government reap some benefit from this state of affairs.

This is not to argue with your point about your employer/employment... I am an avocado rancher in California who gets to set my own hours, create community where I labor and contribute for the local good while at the same time sustaining myself. My job is awesome, and I make no argument about the fact that such things are a growing rarity in the world. However, I don't get to buy many "luxuries" that are enjoyed by people that are more involved in modernity. I haven't stepped out of life entirely, but I have stepped back. The breakneck speed that most people choose to live at affords them more toys, more money and more stress. In the end, you can choose to work less and get paid less... however the recent trend towards having certain services like healthcare tied to what amounts to slavish devotion is something I do not agree with, but that is a discussion for another day. It's also a point I'll concede without argument when it's brought up.

You aren't required to be hyper-efficient to live, but you are required to be hyper-efficient and live like we are told is "living well". I disagree with that, and it sounds like you might as well, but don't see an easily available alternative. I was born into a situation (family ranch) that allows me to not have to sacrifice my Eudaimonia for the sake of a job... I also understand that I am in the minority in that and I consider myself rather fortunate. I used to be a computer tech and I tried to live "normally" but I found that made me damned miserable. I didn't enjoy what I was doing and I did not like who I was becoming, so I put that down and learned to live with less, much to my contentment. I don't get a new computer but once every half dozen and even then I have a strict budget when it comes to that. I get a new cell phone only when the old one has utterly crapped out, at which point I buy last years model. At thirty years old, I have gotten 1 new car in my life and 2 used one (one of which I gave to my girl who had hers die on her). I had to go 2 years with only work trucks for transport, and those I used sparingly so they would last longer for the ranch. I got by. I also am a Zen practitioner, so all of this stuff goes hand in hand with what I study... adding in that has helped me to be content with what I have right here and now, rather than craving what I don't have.

I am not disagreeing with you, but speaking from personal experience and pointing out that there is another way, even if getting to that would take some doing.

Am I a "throw-back"? Some people say that, but I view it as if I am reminding people there is an alternative, another way to live. You don't get rich, but you get by. I don't just talk about it I live it, as best I can.
 
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