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(Huffington Post)   The closest you'll ever come to riding in the ISS. Why yes, it will blow your mind   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 58
    More: Spiffy, International Space Station, Herschel Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, Large Magellanic Cloud, XMM-Newton, elliptical galaxy, Chandra X-ray Observatory, Very Large Array  
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17118 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Jul 2012 at 5:12 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-06 12:07:57 AM
At the 1:21 mark.... THAT WAS ME, WAVING!

Cool video subby!
 
2012-07-06 03:05:07 AM
*flips the bird at the sky*
 
2012-07-06 05:21:36 AM
Remember the part where it was night and you could see all the cities lit up and then it dissolved to a shot of the aurora?

That was awesome.
 
2012-07-06 05:29:27 AM
Pretty good for CGI these days I guess.
 
2012-07-06 06:34:48 AM
To me, the most striking thing about the video is just how very close to Earth the ISS is.

I mean, I understand when I see pics or watch the ISS pass overhead that it's in a low orbit, but the time-lapse really drives home the sense that it is just skimming the atmosphere.

/wish we spent more on this stuff and less on everything else
 
2012-07-06 06:50:18 AM
Makes me sentimental, it does.
 
2012-07-06 07:01:03 AM
Mind blown.
 
2012-07-06 07:04:45 AM
I can't get it to play. Is it just me? I have terrible luck with Vimeoh-hosted videos.
 
2012-07-06 07:28:56 AM

Mandapants: I can't get it to play. Is it just me? I have terrible luck with Vimeoh-hosted videos.


How about Youtube?
 
2012-07-06 07:47:05 AM
That was truly awesome...
 
2012-07-06 08:05:11 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Remember the part where it was night and you could see all the cities lit up and then it dissolved to a shot of the aurora?


Geez, spoiler alert!

Seriously though, if you want more of the same and a bit more time on your hands check out this recreation of Yuri Gagarin's first flight, made from a combo of his TV and radio broadcasts and ISS video.

http://www.firstorbit.org/watch-the-film
 
2012-07-06 08:43:44 AM
Not blown.

These videos would be so much better if there wasn't a cut every 5 seconds. Just let the camera roll all the way around the globe.
 
2012-07-06 08:43:52 AM
It all looks so tiny and unimportant from up there.

That little ball of blue, with the ISS skimming across the surface of the atmosphere is the complete sum collection of humanity. All of it. Thousands of years of history, and art, mathematics, culture, joy and suffering.

That's everything that we are, and have been. And it's all we've got.
 
2012-07-06 08:46:32 AM
deja vu all over again
 
2012-07-06 08:50:11 AM
Wow, aren't they supposed to be "exploring" space? They sure are taking a lot of pictures of this old mud ball, eh?
 
2012-07-06 08:50:43 AM
Wow, that was pretty slick. I want to go!
 
2012-07-06 08:51:01 AM
I wish it wasn't so speedy uppy and all
 
2012-07-06 08:51:20 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Remember the part where it was night and you could see all the cities lit up and then it dissolved to a shot of the aurora?

That was awesome.


I remember that, only I seem to recall it happening at dusk...and I don't remember you being there.
 
2012-07-06 08:55:03 AM
Google Earth did it better
 
2012-07-06 08:59:51 AM

Kaka: I wish it wasn't so speedy uppy and all


I concur. A bit too fast to fully appreciate it.
 
2012-07-06 09:01:40 AM

BurnShrike: It all looks so tiny and unimportant from up there.

That little ball of blue, with the ISS skimming across the surface of the atmosphere is the complete sum collection of humanity. All of it. Thousands of years of history, and art, mathematics, culture, joy and suffering.

That's everything that we are, and have been. And it's all we've got.


Doctor?
 
2012-07-06 09:03:37 AM
Yes, yes that was cool.

Would watch a regular-speed version in IMAX.
 
2012-07-06 09:07:36 AM

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: To me, the most striking thing about the video is just how very close to Earth the ISS is.

I mean, I understand when I see pics or watch the ISS pass overhead that it's in a low orbit, but the time-lapse really drives home the sense that it is just skimming the atmosphere.

/wish we spent more on this stuff and less on everything else


I have a globe of the Earth that is one foot in diameter. At that scale, the moon is about the size of a baseball, around three inches. When I ask people to put the moon at the proper distance from the Earth at that scale they never get it far enough. It should be about 28 feet away.

Conversely when I ask them to show where the ISS or the shuttle would be (back when the shuttle was flying) they get it too far. The ISS would only be about a quarter inch off the surface of the globe.

Makes you have an appreciation for what the Apollo program did. Man those guys, they went somewhere. No castaway on a desert island was ever as physically isolated. And the astronauts who stayed in the command module while the others went down to the surface - when on the far side of the moon and out of radio contact, they were the alonest guys evar.
 
2012-07-06 09:12:32 AM
Its not the pretty show on the bottom 2/3 of the screen that has me transfixed - its the inky blackness on the top 1/3. When I think about what awaits us out there I am not filled with wonder or expectation, but with a deep and unnameable fear...thanks Mr Lovecraft, you've ruined space
 
2012-07-06 09:13:04 AM
Well my mind wasn't blown but it was pretty cool.

I saw a few countries, or maybe just one, that looked like the entire country power usage was in a very grid-like array across the whole country. Was weird looking compared to most that have irregular hotspots mostly near the shorelines. What country was that?
 
2012-07-06 09:14:54 AM
The ISS is watching you masturbate.
 
2012-07-06 09:16:17 AM

BurnShrike: It all looks so tiny and unimportant from up there.

That little ball of blue, with the ISS skimming across the surface of the atmosphere is the complete sum collection of humanity. All of it. Thousands of years of history, and art, mathematics, culture, joy and suffering.

That's everything that we are, and have been. And it's all we've got.


A good paraphrasing. Here's the full quote from Carl Sagan, regarding a picture of Earth taken by the Voyager spacecraft from past the orbit of Neptune:

lazyoptimist.files.wordpress.com


"Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."
― Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
 
2012-07-06 09:21:46 AM

SonOfSpam: Makes you have an appreciation for what the Apollo program did. Man those guys, they went somewhere. No castaway on a desert island was ever as physically isolated. And the astronauts who stayed in the command module while the others went down to the surface - when on the far side of the moon and out of radio contact, they were the alonest guys evar.


lol-- Maybe so, but who had the ride home? :-)
 
2012-07-06 09:25:36 AM

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: To me, the most striking thing about the video is just how very close to Earth the ISS is.


Same here. Very neat video though!
 
2012-07-06 09:27:54 AM

SonOfSpam: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: To me, the most striking thing about the video is just how very close to Earth the ISS is.

I mean, I understand when I see pics or watch the ISS pass overhead that it's in a low orbit, but the time-lapse really drives home the sense that it is just skimming the atmosphere.

/wish we spent more on this stuff and less on everything else

I have a globe of the Earth that is one foot in diameter. At that scale, the moon is about the size of a baseball, around three inches. When I ask people to put the moon at the proper distance from the Earth at that scale they never get it far enough. It should be about 28 feet away.

Conversely when I ask them to show where the ISS or the shuttle would be (back when the shuttle was flying) they get it too far. The ISS would only be about a quarter inch off the surface of the globe.

Makes you have an appreciation for what the Apollo program did. Man those guys, they went somewhere. No castaway on a desert island was ever as physically isolated. And the astronauts who stayed in the command module while the others went down to the surface - when on the far side of the moon and out of radio contact, they were the alonest guys evar.


i have nothing to add - i just had to LOL at your awesome username
that's all, carry on.
 
2012-07-06 09:28:48 AM
I'll tell you what blows my mind, there are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on earth...try getting your mind around that, I can't.
 
2012-07-06 09:37:45 AM

tonguedepressor: I'll tell you what blows my mind, there are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on earth...try getting your mind around that, I can't.


Then this should really blow your skirt up. All those stars account for less than 15% of everything there is. All the planets, dust, gasses, and dark matter make up the rest.
 
2012-07-06 09:43:11 AM

SonOfSpam: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: To me, the most striking thing about the video is just how very close to Earth the ISS is.

I mean, I understand when I see pics or watch the ISS pass overhead that it's in a low orbit, but the time-lapse really drives home the sense that it is just skimming the atmosphere.

/wish we spent more on this stuff and less on everything else

I have a globe of the Earth that is one foot in diameter. At that scale, the moon is about the size of a baseball, around three inches. When I ask people to put the moon at the proper distance from the Earth at that scale they never get it far enough. It should be about 28 feet away.

Conversely when I ask them to show where the ISS or the shuttle would be (back when the shuttle was flying) they get it too far. The ISS would only be about a quarter inch off the surface of the globe.

Makes you have an appreciation for what the Apollo program did. Man those guys, they went somewhere. No castaway on a desert island was ever as physically isolated. And the astronauts who stayed in the command module while the others went down to the surface - when on the far side of the moon and out of radio contact, they were the alonest guys evar.



Michael Collins, hoping against hope he wouldn't have to re-enter alone. How do you even prepare yourself to execute the return plan that starts with the Lunar module being unable to launch back into Lunar orbit?

Also, pictures like this are what gives people mistaken impressions of Lunar orbit dimensions:

upload.wikimedia.org

Whereas the 28 ft you mentioned only comes up in the rare *.gif like this:

upload.wikimedia.org

/wikiMoon
 
2012-07-06 09:47:47 AM
There was a good illustration showing the distance between the Earth and the Moon a little while back, when Venus passed in front of the Sun.

Someone (sorry, I forgot who) created an image of what it'll look like from the surface of Mars when the Earth (and the Moon) pass in front of the Sun in 2084.

Link

The Earth is the larger dark spot with the red reticule. The Moon is the much smaller speck down and to the left of the Earth. The other dark spots are sun spots.
 
2012-07-06 09:51:57 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Wow, aren't they supposed to be "exploring" space? They sure are taking a lot of pictures of this old mud ball, eh?


Its the biggest thing in the window.
 
2012-07-06 09:52:06 AM

HAMMERTOE: tonguedepressor: I'll tell you what blows my mind, there are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on earth...try getting your mind around that, I can't.

Then this should really blow your skirt up. All those stars account for less than 15% of everything there is. All the planets, dust, gasses, and dark matter make up the rest.


Look at this.....

Hubble Ultra Deep Filed photo.....

Imagine taking a grain of rice and putting it at arms length......Hubble took a photo of that big (or tiny) a piece of space over a period of 4 months.....
There are 10,000 galaxies...not start.....entire Milky Way type galaxies... and that was just in the grain of rice in the sky. Imagine all the grains of rice in all 360 degrees of the sky and then multiply that times 100,000 billion...and that's galxies with stars and planets and such....fark Carl Sagan....that just can't be comprehended....


upload.wikimedia.org

/I'm getting a kick out of your replies .....I work for........NASA....HST ....etc etc....
 
2012-07-06 09:53:15 AM
And I can't type or proof read or spell worth a shiat!
 
2012-07-06 09:56:44 AM
Stop...using...so...many...ellipses...Especially...when...they...aren' t...proper.....ellipses......
 
2012-07-06 10:06:02 AM
Look at how choppy and edited that is. It's fake, I can tell by the pixels. Totally shopped
 
2012-07-06 10:16:55 AM

Loomy: SonOfSpam: Monkeyfark Ridiculous:
....
Makes you have an appreciation for what the Apollo program did. Man those guys, they went somewhere. No castaway on a desert island was ever as physically isolated. And the astronauts who stayed in the command module while the others went down to the surface - when on the far side of the moon and out of radio contact, they were the alonest guys evar.


Michael Collins, hoping against hope he wouldn't have to re-enter alone. How do you even prepare yourself to execute the return plan that starts with the Lunar module being unable to launch back into Lunar orbit?


He would've done it because it was what he had to do. It's amazing that Apollo ever got off the ground because of the massive tungsten balls that every one of those guys had. Collins wrote an excellent book about his career and experiences called "Carrying the Fire". It makes a great follow-on to "The Right Stuff".

Also, pictures like this are what gives people mistaken impressions of Lunar orbit dimensions:

[upload.wikimedia.org image 640x256]

Whereas the 28 ft you mentioned only comes up in the rare *.gif like this:

[upload.wikimedia.org image 640x57]

/wikiMoon


"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space."
 
2012-07-06 10:32:00 AM

ChipNASA: HAMMERTOE: tonguedepressor: I'll tell you what blows my mind, there are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on earth...try getting your mind around that, I can't.

Then this should really blow your skirt up. All those stars account for less than 15% of everything there is. All the planets, dust, gasses, and dark matter make up the rest.

Look at this.....

Hubble Ultra Deep Filed photo.....

Imagine taking a grain of rice and putting it at arms length......Hubble took a photo of that big (or tiny) a piece of space over a period of 4 months.....
There are 10,000 galaxies...not start.....entire Milky Way type galaxies... and that was just in the grain of rice in the sky. Imagine all the grains of rice in all 360 degrees of the sky and then multiply that times 100,000 billion...and that's galxies with stars and planets and such....fark Carl Sagan....that just can't be comprehended....


[upload.wikimedia.org image 600x600]

/I'm getting a kick out of your replies .....I work for........NASA....HST ....etc etc....


Looks like the Destiny's flight path.
 
2012-07-06 10:34:16 AM
Mind != blown
 
2012-07-06 10:35:48 AM
Because parking orbits are FUN!
 
2012-07-06 10:39:28 AM

clintp: Not blown.

These videos would be so much better if there wasn't a cut every 5 seconds. Just let the camera roll all the way around the globe.


This ^. I wasn't overly impressed with this version.
 
2012-07-06 11:03:01 AM

Grither: Wow, that was pretty slick. I want to go!


Me too! Some people I know can't understand why I would want to do something so dangerous as get in a rocket to go into space. I would so love to go.
 
2012-07-06 11:46:19 AM

DreamSnipers: Grither: Wow, that was pretty slick. I want to go!

Me too! Some people I know can't understand why I would want to do something so dangerous as get in a rocket to go into space. I would so love to go.


Don't listen to those aspiration shooters go with the hundreds of folk that support your astronaut ambitions!
 
2012-07-06 12:15:43 PM
Cool...would be better without shiatty music and with a direct link to Vimeo instead of farking huffpo
 
2012-07-06 12:16:48 PM

markie_farkie: At the 1:21 mark.... THAT WAS ME, WAVING!

Cool video subby!


I thought I recognized you.
 
2012-07-06 12:31:32 PM
Yep. i knew i named myself this for a reason.
 
2012-07-06 12:39:54 PM
Why?

Why do the kids put crapmuzak on these things?

Two Steps From Hell is where ISS Timelapse noise is at.

Yeah it's pompous and overly portentious.

But I can't stand the 70's style arts n crafts muzak or the meaningless abstract noises.

Other than my piffling over the muzak, GREAT WORK, kid :)
 
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