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(Daily Mail)   China builds replica of Tower of London bridge which features a coffee bar. Because the English are famous for coffee   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 57
    More: Amusing, Tower of London, Jiangsu Province, U.S. Olympic, United States at the Olympics, builder pattern, Chinese, Olympic rings, Sydney Harbour Bridge  
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4466 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jul 2012 at 9:14 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-05 05:47:38 PM  
also, there is no river.
 
2012-07-05 09:17:56 PM  
Historically, the English did guzzle coffee with the best of 'em. It was that Empire building that brought on the tea fixation.
 
2012-07-05 09:19:30 PM  

some_beer_drinker: also, there is no river.


the cake is a lie
 
2012-07-05 09:22:56 PM  
I say!
 
2012-07-05 09:24:30 PM  
I'm curious what "English-style coffee" is like. Anemic, I'd bet.
 
2012-07-05 09:24:46 PM  
Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.
 
2012-07-05 09:25:29 PM  
Maybe it's really a toffee bar.
 
2012-07-05 09:26:06 PM  

Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.


KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.
 
2012-07-05 09:26:15 PM  
subby, are you implying china needs more tea? oh you!
 
2012-07-05 09:28:12 PM  
I remember going to London around 1995. 90s coffee culture hadn't really taken off there yet. Not like in America. The only coffee I found was instant. It was terrible. Ireland as well.

But that only made me drink the tea there, which was awesome.
 
2012-07-05 09:28:13 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: I'm curious what "English-style coffee" is like. AnemicArabica, I'd bet.

 
2012-07-05 09:28:27 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.

KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.


Since it's English, it's a biscuit.
 
2012-07-05 09:30:11 PM  
Spiralmonkey SmartestFunniest 2012-07-05 09:28:27 PM


AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.

KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.

Since it's English, it's a biscuit.


Actually, its a biscuit with a candy covering.
 
2012-07-05 09:30:20 PM  

cleveoh: Historically, the English did guzzle coffee with the best of 'em. It was that Empire building that brought on the tea fixation.


Lloyds was a coffee house ... subby is confused.
 
2012-07-05 09:30:25 PM  

Spiralmonkey: AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.

KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.

Since it's English, it's a biscuit.


I'm pretty sure it's KitKat everywhere. It's a trademark.
 
2012-07-05 09:30:32 PM  
www.coffeeteablog.com
 
2012-07-05 09:30:35 PM  
what the FARK is a Tower of London Bridge???

THERE IS NO SUCK FARKING THING AS A TOWER OF LONDON BRIDGE

There is a Tower of London, There is a Tower Bridge (both of which are in London), and there is a London Bridge, which is in the USA...but there is

NO
TOWER OF LONDON
BRIDGE


//do the world a favor, subby, unplug your computer and bash your brains in with it
 
2012-07-05 09:31:24 PM  

shivashakti: I remember going to London around 1995. 90s coffee culture hadn't really taken off there yet. Not like in America. The only coffee I found was instant. It was terrible. Ireland as well.

But that only made me drink the tea there, which was awesome.


So you didn't make it as far as Queens Lane Coffee House? It's been there since 1652, so pretty much before 1995.
 
2012-07-05 09:31:44 PM  
Tower Bridge, subby. It's just Tower Bridge.
 
2012-07-05 09:32:09 PM  
Other not-quite-perfect replicas:

farm1.static.flickr.com

i4.mirror.co.uk

files.myopera.com
 
2012-07-05 09:32:30 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.

KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.

Since it's English, it's a biscuit.

I'm pretty sure it's KitKat everywhere. It's a trademark.


Invented in England as a biscuit, so it's a biscuit.
 
2012-07-05 09:36:15 PM  

Spiralmonkey: AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.

KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.

Since it's English, it's a biscuit.

I'm pretty sure it's KitKat everywhere. It's a trademark.

Invented in England as a biscuit, so it's a biscuit.


You sure? It says right on the package they are wafers. I don't see 'biscuit' anywhere there.
 
2012-07-05 09:37:50 PM  
valkore
Other not-quite-perfect replicas:

I've heard Chinese claim to be a superior culture, but all they seem to do better than the West is IP infringement and child abuse.
 
2012-07-05 09:38:28 PM  

Spiralmonkey: So you didn't make it as far as Queens Lane Coffee House? It's been there since 1652, so pretty much before 1995.


No. I didn't.
I'm sure there were places to get good coffee in London.
Just as now there are good places in America to get good tea.

But good coffee in London wasn't ubiquitous in 1995. Just as good tea still isn't in America.
Can I find it? Sure. But not at most places.

Most places I was in London and throughout Ireland in 1995 served only instant coffee. They certainly didn't have freshly roasted, freshly ground good coffee.
 
2012-07-05 09:39:38 PM  

shivashakti: I remember going to London around 1995. 90s coffee culture hadn't really taken off there yet. Not like in America. The only coffee I found was instant. It was terrible. Ireland as well.

But that only made me drink the tea there, which was awesome.


You were in Ireland & didn't stop at Bewley's to commune with the spirits of Irish literary greats over a cup of non-descript & somewhat overpriced coffee?
 
2012-07-05 09:39:51 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: You sure? It says right on the package they are wafers. I don't see 'biscuit' anywhere there.


You're really hammering home the "average" bit in your handle, isn't it?
 
2012-07-05 09:40:00 PM  
Thread jack: scene in Pineapple Express where Saul is captured, led into a garage where he is forced below ground (pot el'dorado) where there are 3 windows emitting sunlight (despite being below ground). Ground level they cross a series of rectangular pools to offices...

Recent movie filmed same location. Any guesses?
 
2012-07-05 09:40:54 PM  
In Costa Rica before Americans ruined the beach towns closest to the airport, there was a big red pizza place with a big red roof in Jaco. It was called Pizza Hat. Now there is a Pizza Hut and a Domino's in that same town. Pizza Hat is gone.
 
2012-07-05 09:42:14 PM  
As are the Chinese...
 
2012-07-05 09:42:31 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.

KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.

Since it's English, it's a biscuit.

I'm pretty sure it's KitKat everywhere. It's a trademark.

Invented in England as a biscuit, so it's a biscuit.

You sure? It says right on the package they are wafers. I don't see 'biscuit' anywhere there.


Then I feel sad for you, you must be subjected to a foreign imposter that has chocolate-style wax coating instead of the real thick chocolatey layer of tastiness. Don't even get started on the question of biscuitiness, it only opens up the whole "is a Jaffa Cake a cake or a biscuit" controversy.
 
2012-07-05 09:43:54 PM  

SirEattonHogg: Spiralmonkey SmartestFunniest 2012-07-05 09:28:27 PM


AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.

KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.

Since it's English, it's a biscuit.

Actually, its a biscuit with a candy covering.




Chocolate isn't candy.
 
2012-07-05 09:44:04 PM  
What'll you have, Rik?

Just coffee.

Uh, this is a pub, RIk. They don't do coffee.

Well, then nothing I suppose. I want to stay in control...

/ish
 
2012-07-05 09:50:39 PM  

cleveoh: You were in Ireland & didn't stop at Bewley's to commune with the spirits of Irish literary greats over a cup of non-descript & somewhat overpriced coffee?


No, but I did go to Yeats' grave... That counts for communing with the spirits of Irish literary greats, no?
 
2012-07-05 09:51:41 PM  

JSieverts: what the FARK is a Tower of London Bridge???

THERE IS NO SUCK FARKING THING AS A TOWER OF LONDON BRIDGE

There is a Tower of London, There is a Tower Bridge (both of which are in London), and there is a London Bridge, which is in the USA...but there is

NO
TOWER OF LONDON
BRIDGE

//do the world a favor, subby, unplug your computer and bash your brains in with it


Came to say this....I was beaten to it.

/good show, chap.
 
2012-07-05 09:53:08 PM  

Allen. The end.


What'll you have, Rik?

Just coffee.

Uh, this is a pub, RIk. They don't do coffee.

Well, then nothing I suppose. I want to stay in control...

/ish


"Wai-TER!"

"WAI-TER!!"

[ (p)Rick gets two-finger salute from barmaid ]
 
2012-07-05 10:01:27 PM  
Some days you need a break from all the tea.
 
2012-07-05 10:19:40 PM  
Suzhou is known as the "Venice of China," because of all it's canals, yet they couldn't build this stupid thing across one of them?
Also, the last time I was in China, there wasn't a single decent cup of coffee to be found for love or yuan. We found "Hawaiian coffee" listed on a menu at our hotel, but it turned out to be Maxwell House instant with artificially-flavored pineapple ice cream.
 
2012-07-05 10:27:00 PM  

Feral Duhbya: Suzhou is known as the "Venice of China," because of all it's canals, yet they couldn't build this stupid thing across one of them?
Also, the last time I was in China, there wasn't a single decent cup of coffee to be found for love or yuan. We found "Hawaiian coffee" listed on a menu at our hotel, but it turned out to be Maxwell House instant with artificially-flavored pineapple ice cream.




I suspect the Chinese feel similarly when confronted with the stuff that claims to be Chinese food in the West.
 
2012-07-05 11:45:21 PM  

JSieverts: what the FARK is a Tower of London Bridge???

THERE IS NO SUCK FARKING THING AS A TOWER OF LONDON BRIDGE

There is a Tower of London, There is a Tower Bridge (both of which are in London), and there is a London Bridge, which is in the USA...but there is

NO
TOWER OF LONDON
BRIDGE

//do the world a favor, subby, unplug your computer and bash your brains in with it


Just be glad they didn't refer to it as London Bridge - that vein on your forehead probably would have burst.
 
2012-07-06 12:21:22 AM  

SirEattonHogg: Spiralmonkey SmartestFunniest 2012-07-05 09:28:27 PM


AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.

KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.

Since it's English, it's a biscuit.

Actually, its a biscuit with a candy covering.


Pfft, chocolate isn't candy. It's the food of the gods.

/No, really
//it's derived from the plant theobroma cacao
///check hte etomology
 
2012-07-06 12:48:17 AM  

shivashakti: Spiralmonkey: So you didn't make it as far as Queens Lane Coffee House? It's been there since 1652, so pretty much before 1995.


Most places I was in London and throughout Ireland in 1995 served only instant coffee. They certainly didn't have freshly roasted, freshly ground good coffee.




So what you actually mean is that you couldn't find a Starbucks on every corner, which is actually a blessing. Haven't lived in UK since the 70s but do visit about once a year and have never had any trouble finding good coffee.

As has been pointed out, coffee culture started in UK in the 17th century and was maybe at its height in the 18th and 19th century coffee houses of London where café culture as it is known today was probably invented in places like Tom and Moll King's coffee house by the British literary and high society, alongside French noblemen self-exiled in UK from the French revolution. London coffee-houses saw the creation of insurance industry (Lloyd's), the London stock-exchange (Jonathan's).

Following the war there was a large number of Italian immigrants to many areas of UK (not just London) so the 50s and 60s saw an upswing in coffee culture again, very popular amongst the post-war folk culture beatniks, and later bikers and mods.

Troubadours in London (later copied in LA) is the most famous maybe and is still there today iirc. Even in the 60s in my relatively small home-town of just a few hundred thousand there were at least 5 or 6 Italian family owned coffee houses and going into one of those as 5 year old with my parents was a fantastic treat with the smell of the roasting beans, fresh ground coffee and hiss of steam frothing the hot milk.

It is maybe true that the average Brit home in the 70s, 80s and 90s might not have a coffee machine (although all my family, friends and every place I rented when visiting back from overseas would have at least a filter coffee machine) and many cheap hotels and cafes would serve instant, but you could always find small, often family run, cafes that served good roast and brewed coffee (usually using Italian brand machines and coffee) all over Britain.

Not easy to find maybe as they wouldn't have a dirty great intrusive sign outside them, but nonetheless could be found just by looking in the window to see what kind of machine they had behind the counter - Illy, Lavazza and Rombouts could be seen in most decent cafes and decent restaurants (and please, no tired jokes about good restaurants and British cuisine, it's as bad as saying all Americans wear cowboy hats and say yippie-aye-yay).

Also, the Italian family owned Costa Coffee company started in the 70s and had a few shops and cafes around London as far back as the 70s, and really expanded in the 90s after being bought out by a big F&B chain. Now they are as ubiquitous as Starbucks (and not much better).

Maybe because of the spread of Costa and Starbucks, people are more likely to accept different kids of coffees - espressos, latte, mocha and different beans than before, so you can generally find good coffee even in places like supermarket and garden centre café's. Along with all the silly orders like 'grande double shotted skinny latte with a hazelnut shot, hold the cream, cinnamon sprinkles'.

Next time you visit, spend a little time to look around - keep out of Costa and Starbucks (unless you think Starbucks is good coffee), and have a look around some of the smaller family run places. Oh and do try Queens and Troubadour in London, just for the history if nothing else. Might not get a seat though.

And, as you probably guessed, I DO like good coffee ☺
 
2012-07-06 12:53:13 AM  
Here's a lovely bon mot about the history of English coffee houses

Enthusiasm for coffeehouses was not universal, however, and some observers regarded them as a worrying development. They grumbled that Christians had taken to a Muslim drink instead of traditional English beer, and fretted that the livelihoods of tavern-keepers might be threatened. But most of all they lamented that coffeehouses were distracting people who ought to be doing useful work, rather than networking and sharing trivia with their acquaintances.

When coffee became popular in Oxford and the coffeehouses selling it began to multiply, the university authorities objected, fearing that coffeehouses were promoting idleness and diverting students from their studies. Anthony Wood, an Oxford antiquarian, was among those who denounced the enthusiasm for the new drink. "Why doth solid and serious learning decline, and few or none follow it now in the university?" he asked. "Answer: Because of coffee-houses, where they spend all their time." Similar concerns were voiced in Cambridge, where one observer noted that
 
2012-07-06 01:10:58 AM  

JSieverts: what the FARK is a Tower of London Bridge???

THERE IS NO SUCK FARKING THING AS A TOWER OF LONDON BRIDGE

There is a Tower of London, There is a Tower Bridge (both of which are in London), and there is a London Bridge, which is in the USA...but there is

NO
TOWER OF LONDON
BRIDGE

//do the world a favor, subby, unplug your computer and bash your brains in with it


wow, this seems very important to you. perhaps you should follow your own advice.
 
2012-07-06 02:21:42 AM  

JSieverts: what the FARK is a Tower of London Bridge???

THERE IS NO SUCK FARKING THING AS A TOWER OF LONDON BRIDGE

There is a Tower of London, There is a Tower Bridge (both of which are in London), and there is a London Bridge, which is in the USA...but there is

NO
TOWER OF LONDON
BRIDGE

//do the world a favor, subby, unplug your computer and bash your brains in with it



Besides the reconstructed one in Arizona to which you're referring, there's a new London Bridge in London, as well, but it's not much to look at.
 
2012-07-06 02:23:26 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: I'm curious what "English-style coffee" is like. Anemic, I'd bet.


Coffee in England is OK. The usual type of fancy coffee bars selling coffee that ranges from horrible to decent. Certainly better than Starbucks anyway.

Costa Coffee UK

The irony of your question is the awful reputation American coffee has in England (and Australia). It's considered slightly less desirable than dish washing water. I have heard that you can get good coffee in the more cosmopolitan cities if you know where to look though.
 
2012-07-06 02:27:01 AM  

JSieverts: what the FARK is a Tower of London Bridge???

THERE IS NO SUCK FARKING THING AS A TOWER OF LONDON BRIDGE

There is a Tower of London, There is a Tower Bridge (both of which are in London), and there is a London Bridge, which is in the USA...but there is

NO
TOWER OF LONDON
BRIDGE

//do the world a favor, subby, unplug your computer and bash your brains in with it


Why so angry? Too much coffee today?
 
2012-07-06 02:37:33 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: AverageAmericanGuy: Spiralmonkey: Coffee houses were around in England from the mid 1600s subby. You may even be familiar with the biscuit that was named after one of 'em - KitKat.

KitKat isn't a biscuit. It's a candy.

Since it's English, it's a biscuit.

I'm pretty sure it's KitKat everywhere. It's a trademark.

Invented in England as a biscuit, so it's a biscuit.

You sure? It says right on the package they are wafers. I don't see 'biscuit' anywhere there.


Biscuit doesn't mean the same thing in the UK as in the US.

A UK biscuit is what would be called a cookie in the US, and a wafer is a type of biscuit. Oreos are considered to be biscuits in the UK.

Also, that which you call candy in the US are known as sweets in the UK, unless it's made of chocolate in which case its just referred to as chocolate.
 
2012-07-06 02:54:56 AM  
Weird how they doubled it and put the road between, instead of having the road go through like in the original.

ftfa: The cloned Tower Bridge in Suzhou in China's Jiangsu province, is an almost identical version of London's landmark

Um, what? It's significantly different. It's doubled (with added overpasses between the two sides), and is missing the abutments at both ends, and the spans between the abutments and the towers.

some_beer_drinker: also, there is no river.


Yes there is, apparently.

i.imgur.com

That's not the Thames.


/abutments abutments abutments
 
2012-07-06 06:32:17 AM  

Spiralmonkey: Don't even get started on the question of biscuitiness, it only opens up the whole "is a Jaffa Cake a cake or a biscuit" controversy.


Cake, and it's been proved in court.
 
2012-07-06 07:44:51 AM  

iron de havilland: Spiralmonkey: Don't even get started on the question of biscuitiness, it only opens up the whole "is a Jaffa Cake a cake or a biscuit" controversy.

Cake, and it's been proved in court.




Their approach to make a giant one (which clearly then resembled a cake) was ingenious.
 
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