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(BBC)   What do you call a man with no legs who goes to the Olympics? An Olympian   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 212
    More: Spiffy, Oscar Pistorius, Paralympics, Court of Arbitration for Sport, IAAF, olympics, legs  
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6700 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jul 2012 at 10:15 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-05 12:04:01 AM

gwydion56: expobill: my wife has a prosthetic hymen

I wondered why she never got tired...


Ha, as if you ever reached it.
 
2012-07-05 12:04:24 AM

Dwight_Yeast: The Only Jeff: A cannon for shotput. A metal fist for boxing. A predator drone for biathlon. And how can you justify prohibiting those once this guy is allowed in?

uh, (for the fourth time) because his prosthetics don't give him any advantage?


They did a study. They do give him an advantage, at least as far as running in a straight line goes. That was the rationale for not allowing him in previous Olympics. The appeal was based on the fact that they only tested running in a straight line, not along a curve as part of the 400m is run, and they didn't test coming out of the starting blocks. You could also suggest that he might experience the same advantage on the turns or at the start, but since no one tested those elements the appeal was granted.
 
2012-07-05 12:07:44 AM

Dwight_Yeast: Does that mean I (and other near-sighted people) shouldn't be allowed to compete in athletic endeavors?


just that winter skiing/shooting one. and archery.
 
2012-07-05 12:08:13 AM

MadAzza: gwydion56: expobill: my wife has a prosthetic hymen

I wondered why she never got tired...

Ha, as if you ever reached it.


[ohsnap.jpg]
 
2012-07-05 12:10:10 AM
My question is whether these prosthetics generate any energy, or whether Pistorus is moving under his own power. If the latter, I don't see it as much of an advantage because, as noted above, he has to propel himself using his thighs and glutes alone. However, if the prosthetics have some sort of battery power that supplements the athlete's normal energy, then it is a tremendous advantage, and should be banned from the olympics.
 
2012-07-05 12:10:16 AM
He has an advantage by sheer physiology (or just engineering if you like).

It is a lot easier for the heart to pump blood to his thighs and back than it is for the other runners who have to pump blood all the way down to their feet and back up (1m or so of difference).
 
2012-07-05 12:11:47 AM
The Olympics (when it comes to track and field) are supposed to kind of be like stock car racing in that all equipment to all is the same and the difference is the human controlling said equipment. This would be shoes, outfits, etc. Can a person with two legs use these blades as their shoes? Then it's BS.

For anyone stating that because he isn't fastest it shows it is not an advantage, that is stupid logic. That's like stating that everyone besides me has to run barefoot, but I can use shoes because it gives me no advantage because I don't beat them.

It wouldn't be "fair" to him if he was excluded, but the flip side is it isn't fair to the other competitors (and whomever he took a slot from) that he gets to use something outside of his natural abilities. Something about the needs of the many...

He's an incredible athlete, but there is no way to state that he would be world class if he had been born with legs. How many people run on these blades? How many run on their legs? The chance (statistically) that he would be one of the elite athletes based purely on ability is statistically insignificant.

The best proof (not that it would be definitive) would not be his race times against others, but would be to compare his race times by mark against others. He is slow out of the blocks (for obvious reasons) and makes up time as the race goes on. I haven't been able to find a ton of this information, but compare the last 100 or 50 of his 400 against his competitors. Also do the same for every 50 or 100 split and look for trends. I would bet that his later times are closer to world class and the first 50 is what prevents him from being number 1 or 2.
 
2012-07-05 12:14:00 AM

SharkTrager: No. The blades serve all those functions, and do so better, and more efficiently, than calves. Further, they weigh less.


Reposting for the emphasis on weight. How much will his average competitor's feet, ankles and calves weigh in comparison to these prostheses, where a couple of ounces' difference in the weight of a pair of shoes impacts finishing time in a sport measured in thousandths of seconds?
 
2012-07-05 12:18:10 AM
To anyone who thinks he has an advantage: I'd like to see your face when he asks you if you'd like to trade legs with him.
 
2012-07-05 12:19:10 AM

LMark: My question is whether these prosthetics generate any energy, or whether Pistorus is moving under his own power. If the latter, I don't see it as much of an advantage because, as noted above, he has to propel himself using his thighs and glutes alone. However, if the prosthetics have some sort of battery power that supplements the athlete's normal energy, then it is a tremendous advantage, and should be banned from the olympics.


Never played with a pogo stick, have you?
 
2012-07-05 12:22:12 AM
What did they use as a control in the test since he was born without legs?

Does he have to have a tech inspection like in NASCAR?
 
2012-07-05 12:23:46 AM
www.speakinggump.com
 
2012-07-05 12:24:49 AM

ZoSo_the_Crowe: To anyone who thinks he has an advantage: I'd like to see your face when he asks you if you'd like to trade legs with him.


I never aspired to be an olympic runner. My legs wouldn't only kill his dreams, but would probably drive him insane for wont of speed.

But I'd like remind you they make these same kind of prothesis as boots for people with feet. You can light jog at 22 mph and jump 5 ft vertically with ease. I've see people using them in the park. Flo Jo was faster, Jordan leapt higher, but both only just.
 
2012-07-05 12:25:12 AM

Balchinian: MadAzza: gwydion56: expobill: my wife has a prosthetic hymen

I wondered why she never got tired...

Ha, as if you ever reached it.

[ohsnap.jpg]


Yeah, I rather enjoyed that!
 
2012-07-05 12:26:39 AM

Dwight_Yeast: lohphat: In their place he has light-weight mechanical springs that don't fatigue.

...and he doesn't have calf muscles. Or feet. Everyone who's looked at this scientifically has come to the same conclusion: any advantage he gets from the weight and (notional) fatigue issues is lost because he's forced to run in a way we're not designed to.

I'm a cyclist, and if I had to ride without calf muscles or feet (as people who compete in the Paralympics do), I would be at a great disadvantage, as you don't just crank with your upper legs, but with your calves as well. There's no way I'd be as fast as I currently am with legs without them.


He also doesn't have the weight of calf muscles, bones, and feet at the end of a long lever arm (his leg). That's a large mechanical advantage.
 
2012-07-05 12:27:41 AM

ZoSo_the_Crowe: To anyone who thinks he has an advantage: I'd like to see your face when he asks you if you'd like to trade legs with him.


The question he'd be asking would have nothing to do with the question at hand. I wouldn't want to trade places with Edward Scissorhands either, but he would have an advantage in a shrubbery cutting competition.

encrypted-tbn1.google.com
 
2012-07-05 12:29:24 AM
If it's about what is fair, shouldn't he be required to carry ballast (or some other kind of weight) to make up for the fact that he is probably 20% lighter than he would be with legs?
 
2012-07-05 12:29:29 AM

RogermcAllen: He has an advantage by sheer physiology (or just engineering if you like).

It is a lot easier for the heart to pump blood to his thighs and back than it is for the other runners who have to pump blood all the way down to their feet and back up (1m or so of difference).


You're kidding, yes?
 
2012-07-05 12:36:42 AM
Ok. Let's walk through the list on his prostesis' advantages and disadvantages.

Advantage: Not as many muscles that fatigue
Disadvantage: Being forced to move in a way the body is not designed for.
Advantage: Prostesis likely lighter then flesh.
Disadvantage: Smaller contact area with ground meaning less traction, thus less able to build up speed.

I think it all about evens out.
 
2012-07-05 12:37:17 AM

retarded: RogermcAllen: He has an advantage by sheer physiology (or just engineering if you like).

It is a lot easier for the heart to pump blood to his thighs and back than it is for the other runners who have to pump blood all the way down to their feet and back up (1m or so of difference).

You're kidding, yes?


Which part of my statement is untrue or comical, be specific?
 
2012-07-05 12:39:54 AM
Link

Flex-Sprint
As the name implies, this foot is designed for short, powerful bursts of speed.
Recommended for transfemoral amputees, this custom foot, is a stand-out in the athletic arena for its unparalleled energy return.

Flex-Foot Cheetah
The design captures the running characteristics of the Cheetah, the world's fastest land animal. It replicates the big cat's hind leg, whose foot extends and reaches out to paw at the ground while the large thigh muscles pull the body forward


Looks to me like its only a matter of time before tech/engineering gives them an obvious advantage......

Can he swap out the Cheetah for the Sailfish and compete in aquatic events?
 
2012-07-05 12:41:21 AM

D-Wolf2k2: Disadvantage: Being forced to move in a way the body is not designed for.


This would be true for someone who was born with legs and lost them. For someone who never had them they don't have any muscle memory or anything else that needs to be "retrained". If you're talking about just in general that the human body isn't designed to work that way a lifetime of using something a given way makes it natural to the individual. I've seen people missing hands that are much more adept with hand tools than I am.
 
HBK
2012-07-05 12:45:23 AM

Giltric: Link

Flex-Sprint
As the name implies, this foot is designed for short, powerful bursts of speed.
Recommended for transfemoral amputees, this custom foot, is a stand-out in the athletic arena for its unparalleled energy return.

Flex-Foot Cheetah
The design captures the running characteristics of the Cheetah, the world's fastest land animal. It replicates the big cat's hind leg, whose foot extends and reaches out to paw at the ground while the large thigh muscles pull the body forward


Looks to me like its only a matter of time before tech/engineering gives them an obvious advantage......

Can he swap out the Cheetah for the Sailfish and compete in aquatic events?


I was born without feet so I should be allowed to use these giant flippers I've attached to my nubs which also weigh less and have less drag than feet.
 
2012-07-05 12:49:31 AM

D-Wolf2k2: Ok. Let's walk through the list on his prostesis' advantages and disadvantages.

Advantage: Not as many muscles that fatigue
Disadvantage: Being forced to move in a way the body is not designed for.
Advantage: Prostesis likely lighter then flesh.
Disadvantage: Smaller contact area with ground meaning less traction, thus less able to build up speed.

I think it all about evens out.


There was a scientific study conducted that proved that they give absolutely zero benefit over normal legs. That study was linked earlier up in the thread. That people are still arguing about whether or not it gives an advantage is farking moronic. People need to go read what the experts said.

In case you're wondering, it said there wasn't any benefit whatsoever or actual legs. Fatigue, stamina, power, the legs provided the same functionality as actual legs.
 
2012-07-05 01:02:32 AM

CreamFilling: Dwight_Yeast: The Only Jeff: A cannon for shotput. A metal fist for boxing. A predator drone for biathlon. And how can you justify prohibiting those once this guy is allowed in?

uh, (for the fourth time) because his prosthetics don't give him any advantage?

They did a study. They do give him an advantage, at least as far as running in a straight line goes. That was the rationale for not allowing him in previous Olympics. The appeal was based on the fact that they only tested running in a straight line, not along a curve as part of the 400m is run, and they didn't test coming out of the starting blocks. You could also suggest that he might experience the same advantage on the turns or at the start, but since no one tested those elements the appeal was granted.


Mr. Carpenter: D-Wolf2k2: Ok. Let's walk through the list on his prostesis' advantages and disadvantages.

Advantage: Not as many muscles that fatigue
Disadvantage: Being forced to move in a way the body is not designed for.
Advantage: Prostesis likely lighter then flesh.
Disadvantage: Smaller contact area with ground meaning less traction, thus less able to build up speed.

I think it all about evens out.

There was a scientific study conducted that proved that they give absolutely zero benefit over normal legs. That study was linked earlier up in the thread. That people are still arguing about whether or not it gives an advantage is farking moronic. People need to go read what the experts said.

In case you're wondering, it said there wasn't any benefit whatsoever or actual legs. Fatigue, stamina, power, the legs provided the same functionality as actual legs.

 
2012-07-05 01:05:30 AM

MisterLoki: CreamFilling: Dwight_Yeast: The Only Jeff: A cannon for shotput. A metal fist for boxing. A predator drone for biathlon. And how can you justify prohibiting those once this guy is allowed in?

uh, (for the fourth time) because his prosthetics don't give him any advantage?

They did a study. They do give him an advantage, at least as far as running in a straight line goes. That was the rationale for not allowing him in previous Olympics. The appeal was based on the fact that they only tested running in a straight line, not along a curve as part of the 400m is run, and they didn't test coming out of the starting blocks. You could also suggest that he might experience the same advantage on the turns or at the start, but since no one tested those elements the appeal was granted.

Mr. Carpenter: D-Wolf2k2: Ok. Let's walk through the list on his prostesis' advantages and disadvantages.

Advantage: Not as many muscles that fatigue
Disadvantage: Being forced to move in a way the body is not designed for.
Advantage: Prostesis likely lighter then flesh.
Disadvantage: Smaller contact area with ground meaning less traction, thus less able to build up speed.

I think it all about evens out.

There was a scientific study conducted that proved that they give absolutely zero benefit over normal legs. That study was linked earlier up in the thread. That people are still arguing about whether or not it gives an advantage is farking moronic. People need to go read what the experts said.

In case you're wondering, it said there wasn't any benefit whatsoever or actual legs. Fatigue, stamina, power, the legs provided the same functionality as actual legs.


Oh I see you can invent things too, go read the farking study you illiterate coont, they do not give an advantage, go farking read it. Go, please, or don't comment again.
 
2012-07-05 01:07:12 AM
can he run clean though greenboro county?
 
2012-07-05 01:07:43 AM
Obviously, the prosthetic legs are conferring no special advantage, or he would have made the time to qualify for the individual event. And whoever argued "Well, his legs don't feel pain," or whatever is missing one important point: They also don't feel the GROUND. If he makes a misstep he's not going to be able to correct in time, like a person who has feet can, because there isn't any immediate feedback from his foot to his spinal cord.

Try running when both your feet are asleep, if you think that somehow doesn't matter.
 
2012-07-05 01:17:32 AM

Gyrfalcon: Obviously, the prosthetic legs are conferring no special advantage, or he would have made the time to qualify for the individual event. And whoever argued "Well, his legs don't feel pain," or whatever is missing one important point: They also don't feel the GROUND. If he makes a misstep he's not going to be able to correct in time, like a person who has feet can, because there isn't any immediate feedback from his foot to his spinal cord.

Try running when both your feet are asleep, if you think that somehow doesn't matter.


That's a different sensation completely. It's painful, not simply an absence of sensation.
 
2012-07-05 01:18:41 AM
i132.photobucket.com
Approves.
 
2012-07-05 01:42:45 AM
I don;t think he has an advantage for one reason. A big part of these sprints is pushing off with each step. He can't do that, lacking ankles and calves. He must rely solely on his leg speed and can't really explode forward with each step.. Even if his legs are springy they can only rebound with as much force as he puts into them, they can't surge him forward with each step like an ankle can with a mini jump.
 
2012-07-05 01:44:13 AM

D-Wolf2k2: Ok. Let's walk through the list on his prostesis' advantages and disadvantages.

Advantage: Not as many muscles that fatigue
Disadvantage: Being forced to move in a way the body is not designed for.
Advantage: Prostesis likely lighter then flesh.
Disadvantage: Smaller contact area with ground meaning less traction, thus less able to build up speed.

I think it all about evens out.


Are you still in high school? Less traction from a smaller area!? Go read a physics book.


The potential sports problems:

1. Energy return: Theoretically superior to muscles.

2. Length: He can make these a bit longer than his natural lega would have been.

3. Injury: He can never break an ankle.

Why it doesn't matter: He can't even qualify for what he set out to do and even
a +5 doesn't mean your total score's better.

What's the issue? The future. His legs are amazing. Compare them to Long John Silver style pegs and it's out of this world how much the tech's improved. The tech won't stop improving. One day, the prosthesis market will crop up with something much better than flesh and blood.

This is the real issue. Any fool can hop in a car and pull off a four minute mile. It's easy peasy. But it was only recently recorded from sprinters because of rules about what qualifies and what doesn't. This time, it's not a problem, but if we start combining the special olympics and the regular ones, it's going to be a bloodbath (well, protestbath anyway) when the tech does improve.
 
2012-07-05 02:01:32 AM

Balchinian: The only objection I have to this man participating has nothing to do with the mechanical nature of his prosthetics. It is that he has no nerves with which to feel the pain other athletes feel, and suffer from, as a normal part of the competition. Overcoming physical discomfort, and even outright pain, is a huge part of athleticism...a part he is immune from experiencing while others are not. That is what gives him a significant physical advantage over the other competitors, and that IMO makes it less than fair.


Talk to anyone who's ever worn prosthetic legs, and ask them how pain-free it is.
 
2012-07-05 02:06:52 AM

HeartBurnKid: Balchinian: The only objection I have to this man participating has nothing to do with the mechanical nature of his prosthetics. It is that he has no nerves with which to feel the pain other athletes feel, and suffer from, as a normal part of the competition. Overcoming physical discomfort, and even outright pain, is a huge part of athleticism...a part he is immune from experiencing while others are not. That is what gives him a significant physical advantage over the other competitors, and that IMO makes it less than fair.

Talk to anyone who's ever worn prosthetic legs, and ask them how pain-free it is.


It depends on the cause of the need for prosthetics -- there's usually a big difference if it's due to injury, surgery, or congenital.
 
2012-07-05 02:07:13 AM

doglover: D-Wolf2k2: Ok. Let's walk through the list on his prostesis' advantages and disadvantages.

Advantage: Not as many muscles that fatigue
Disadvantage: Being forced to move in a way the body is not designed for.
Advantage: Prostesis likely lighter then flesh.
Disadvantage: Smaller contact area with ground meaning less traction, thus less able to build up speed.

I think it all about evens out.

Are you still in high school? Less traction from a smaller area!? Go read a physics book.


Ok, I likely phrased that wrong. I'm a Biochem major not a physics major. But my point on that one was that since his blade doesn't have the same amount of surface area as a normal foot, he doesn't have the same area to push off against to generate force.
 
2012-07-05 02:10:17 AM

Mr. Carpenter: MisterLoki: CreamFilling: Dwight_Yeast: The Only Jeff: A cannon for shotput. A metal fist for boxing. A predator drone for biathlon. And how can you justify prohibiting those once this guy is allowed in?

uh, (for the fourth time) because his prosthetics don't give him any advantage?

They did a study. They do give him an advantage, at least as far as running in a straight line goes. That was the rationale for not allowing him in previous Olympics. The appeal was based on the fact that they only tested running in a straight line, not along a curve as part of the 400m is run, and they didn't test coming out of the starting blocks. You could also suggest that he might experience the same advantage on the turns or at the start, but since no one tested those elements the appeal was granted.

Mr. Carpenter: D-Wolf2k2: Ok. Let's walk through the list on his prostesis' advantages and disadvantages.

Advantage: Not as many muscles that fatigue
Disadvantage: Being forced to move in a way the body is not designed for.
Advantage: Prostesis likely lighter then flesh.
Disadvantage: Smaller contact area with ground meaning less traction, thus less able to build up speed.

I think it all about evens out.

There was a scientific study conducted that proved that they give absolutely zero benefit over normal legs. That study was linked earlier up in the thread. That people are still arguing about whether or not it gives an advantage is farking moronic. People need to go read what the experts said.

In case you're wondering, it said there wasn't any benefit whatsoever or actual legs. Fatigue, stamina, power, the legs provided the same functionality as actual legs.

Oh I see you can invent things too, go read the farking study you illiterate coont, they do not give an advantage, go farking read it. Go, please, or don't comment again.


If you're talking about the study they reported on Yahoo all it says is that his oxygen curve is the same as a regular athlete. Which is only one potential issue. The legs could be bringing him UP to that level. Perhaps he's only a B+ athlete but with the legs he's an A like everyone else. That's not fair to all the A- athletes out there who don't get to compete.
 
2012-07-05 02:11:43 AM

doglover: 1. Energy return: Theoretically superior to muscles.


Except it's not. Also, he himself admits that his legs make him really susceptible to issues in cross winds and to wet track conditions.
 
2012-07-05 02:11:59 AM
BTW, I love that we're now arguing about whether prosthetics can make a person a superior athlete. Truly, we are living in the future.

/can I get a pair of "Kid Stealth" legs?
 
2012-07-05 02:13:11 AM

Gyrfalcon: Obviously, the prosthetic legs are conferring no special advantage, or he would have made the time to qualify for the individual event. And whoever argued "Well, his legs don't feel pain," or whatever is missing one important point: They also don't feel the GROUND. If he makes a misstep he's not going to be able to correct in time, like a person who has feet can, because there isn't any immediate feedback from his foot to his spinal cord.

Try running when both your feet are asleep, if you think that somehow doesn't matter.


His legs may confer a special advantage, but not enough to bring him to a qualifying time. If I lost my legs and got these ones I wouldn't be an Olympian, but that's the limits of my flabby pasty body, not limits of the technology.
 
2012-07-05 02:14:21 AM

The Only Jeff: . Perhaps he's only a B+ athlete but with the legs he's an A like everyone else


Given his times, he's not.
 
2012-07-05 02:22:16 AM

D-Wolf2k2: doglover: D-Wolf2k2: Ok. Let's walk through the list on his prostesis' advantages and disadvantages.

Advantage: Not as many muscles that fatigue
Disadvantage: Being forced to move in a way the body is not designed for.
Advantage: Prostesis likely lighter then flesh.
Disadvantage: Smaller contact area with ground meaning less traction, thus less able to build up speed.

I think it all about evens out.

Are you still in high school? Less traction from a smaller area!? Go read a physics book.

Ok, I likely phrased that wrong. I'm a Biochem major not a physics major. But my point on that one was that since his blade doesn't have the same amount of surface area as a normal foot, he doesn't have the same area to push off against to generate force.


Gya! Just gya!

The average force is independant of surface area! That's why an ice pick is so good at going into things point first. All that force at one tiny point. Try using it backwards and good luck.

As long as our man here isn't running on mud, the size of his contact are means very little for acceleration. If anything, he'll have better traction because his surface area is lower.
 
2012-07-05 02:48:32 AM

Sargun: If this guy had an advantage he wouldn't have missed his shot at the real event he was participating in and only gotten in on a technicality by participating on a relay team.


What do you believe the odds are that this man would be in this position had he been fully healthy?

There will be better athletes and better technology. This is a horrible precedent.
 
2012-07-05 02:55:34 AM

Dwight_Yeast: Because of my persciption, there have been times in my life when I had better than 20/20 vision. Wouldn't that put me at unfair advantage, especially in something like the Biathlon?


Corrective lenses have been allowed in sporting events for a long time. Precedent and all that.

Prosthetic legs are not the same animal. Corrective lenses are comparable to shoes, not feet.
 
2012-07-05 02:58:19 AM

Dwight_Yeast: Indeed, because that would indicate the prosthetics give him an enormous advantage. But we come back around to basic human anatomy, and the fact that he's at a huge disadvantage to begin with and the prosthetics are binging him up to the point that he's on par with people competing at the Olympic level.


Okay, then you're arguing for events such as the shot put, we should adjust the weight/mass of the ball so as to create a handicap for those who are weaker than the bests competitors?

That's much closer to what's happening here than a person wearing contact lenses.
 
2012-07-05 03:01:02 AM
For the record, I have no problem with Robles wrestling without a leg. I'm slightly more annoyed with the idea of weightlifting records being broken by those missing various limbs, but that's NOTHING compared to a guy who is running on springs.

Hey, let's just allow guys to run on stilts (or Go Go Gadget Springs) in the 2016 Olympics. After all, Usain Bolt is taller than most sprinters, so they deserve a break.
 
2012-07-05 03:07:22 AM

puffy999: What do you believe the odds are that this man would be in this position had he been fully healthy?


If he had his real legs he'd have no problem making the A standard qualifying time for the Olympics.
 
2012-07-05 03:09:39 AM
BTW there are many other sprinters who run with prosthetic legs, the same legs as Pistorius uses. And they're nowhere near the times for runners with two real legs. Hell runners with one prosthetic leg are nowhere near those times.
 
HBK
2012-07-05 03:26:41 AM

WhyteRaven74: BTW there are many other sprinters who run with prosthetic legs, the same legs as Pistorius uses. And they're nowhere near the times for runners with two real legs. Hell runners with one prosthetic leg are nowhere near those times.


It would be an interesting study to see the percentage of prothesis wearing sprinters compared to the number of amputees or prothesis wearers, then compare that to the percentage of sprinters against the number of normal, non prothesis persons. I'd wager that the percentage of prothesis folks outweighs the normals because being able to run is empowering to these otherwise slighted folks. There are other factors to consider as well: legs lost later in life (like in war those folks obviously weren't olympics bound to begin with), shiatty genetics (similarly, probably not top athletes),. It would also be interesting to look at the lifetime hours of training of prothesis wearers against natural professional and amateur athletes, and compare their times. With these data points, it may be easier to determine whether there's an advantage and how considerable it is.
 
2012-07-05 04:11:57 AM

WhyteRaven74: BTW there are many other sprinters who run with prosthetic legs, the same legs as Pistorius uses. And they're nowhere near the times for runners with two real legs. Hell runners with one prosthetic leg are nowhere near those times.


It's not a now problem, it's a then problem.

Prosthetics aren't quite as good as real legs yet. But you know what? They had a shiat fit in Bejing over the times set by people in the Speedo body suits. We've always had swimwear of some sort, but these were considered near cheating.

Prosthetic legs designed for running? A little bit more of a one up than a swim suit if they work well.
 
2012-07-05 05:20:21 AM

doglover: Prosthetic legs designed for running? A little bit more of a one up than a swim suit if they work well.


If you can find a way to alter basic biomechanics the legs might end up there, but as it is, you're relying on something storing effort whereas human muscle produces effort.
 
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