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(Christian Post)   Judge sentences defendant to Bible Study. Its like they aren't even trying to hide it anymore   (christianpost.com) divider line 329
    More: Asinine, Bibles, South Carolina, Bible studies, Sunday School, Cassandra Tolley  
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6239 clicks; posted to Politics » on 04 Jul 2012 at 4:57 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-04 11:01:42 AM  
The only way this could be appropriate is if they guy was charged with destroying Bibles somewhere.
 
2012-07-04 11:12:07 AM  
Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.
 
2012-07-04 11:39:30 AM  

kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.


Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.
 
2012-07-04 11:50:11 AM  

mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.


A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.
 
2012-07-04 11:59:05 AM  

mauricecano: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.

A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.


I've read my share of Grisham novels, I know how this works. Seriously though, I guess I'm trying too hard to figure out the motivation of a judge to do something so stupid.
 
2012-07-04 12:00:05 PM  

kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.



I always thought that Job was an elaborate joke, but somewhere along the way, people stopped getting it, and now they think it's "holy" and are afraid to laugh.
 
2012-07-04 12:21:24 PM  

mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.


The defendant acquiesced to the sentence.

As for the Book of Job, perhaps the defendant had been drinking because something bad happened to her recently.
 
2012-07-04 12:23:00 PM  

mrshowrules: mauricecano: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.

A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.

I've read my share of Grisham novels, I know how this works. Seriously though, I guess I'm trying too hard to figure out the motivation of a judge to do something so stupid.


*Shrug*, I think it's actually pretty easy, and akin to the judges making certain offenders stand outside wearing signs as a part of their judgement. The judge believes that it might drive the point home to the person more and/or reform them...in this case, you have a southern judge (very important point there) who believes this bible study penance will help reform this woman. And the funny part is...being that she's from the south as well and probably has some religious background, it's entirely possible it might. Not because the scripture has any magical power (particularly Job), but that it taps deep into her psyche.
 
2012-07-04 12:31:01 PM  

ArkAngel: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.

The defendant acquiesced to the sentence.

As for the Book of Job, perhaps the defendant had been drinking because something bad happened to her recently.


Still, it is a problem if declining would have had a significant penalty--like the 8yrs in jail.
 
2012-07-04 12:33:34 PM  

kid_icarus: mrshowrules: mauricecano: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.

A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.

I've read my share of Grisham novels, I know how this works. Seriously though, I guess I'm trying too hard to figure out the motivation of a judge to do something so stupid.

*Shrug*, I think it's actually pretty easy, and akin to the judges making certain offenders stand outside wearing signs as a part of their judgement. The judge believes that it might drive the point home to the person more and/or reform them...in this case, you have a southern judge (very important point there) who believes this bible study penance will help reform this woman. And the funny part is...being that she's from the south as well and probably has some religious background, it's entirely possible it might. Not because the scripture has any magical power (particu ...


I wonder if the summary clearly illustrated and supported how the Book of Job was actually a steaming pile of shiat would be acceptable in terms of fulfilling her sentence.
 
2012-07-04 12:37:32 PM  

mrshowrules: kid_icarus: mrshowrules: mauricecano: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.

A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.

I've read my share of Grisham novels, I know how this works. Seriously though, I guess I'm trying too hard to figure out the motivation of a judge to do something so stupid.

*Shrug*, I think it's actually pretty easy, and akin to the judges making certain offenders stand outside wearing signs as a part of their judgement. The judge believes that it might drive the point home to the person more and/or reform them...in this case, you have a southern judge (very important point there) who believes this bible study penance will help reform this woman. And the funny part is...being that she's from the south as well and probably has some religious background, it's entirely possible it might. Not because the scripture has any magical po ...


Yeah, I can't figure why he chose the book of Job, either...it's OT at it's most bizarre and mythical. Frankly I'm surprised it was included in the bible.
 
2012-07-04 01:45:22 PM  
farking zealots.
 
2012-07-04 01:57:44 PM  
Sounds like she was studying Jack 7:50 before she got behind the wheel
 
2012-07-04 02:01:15 PM  

mauricecano: A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.


THIS
and any sentence which includes religion, should be automatically appealed, the judge should be automatically removed from the bench and disbarred. permanently.

CLEAR and PRESENT danger to society.
 
2012-07-04 02:18:23 PM  
Go fark yourself, your honor.
 
2012-07-04 02:37:33 PM  
Most of the programs people are sentenced to for drug/alcohol offenses are religious based just try telling a judge you don't want to go to AA because it's faith based.
 
2012-07-04 02:59:16 PM  

namatad: mauricecano: A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.

THIS
and any sentence which includes religion, should be automatically appealed, the judge should be automatically removed from the bench and disbarred. permanently.

CLEAR and PRESENT danger to society.


I agree the judge should be disbarred.
 
2012-07-04 03:11:29 PM  
Oh, great, she'll probably not get another DUI.

But she might start slaughtering whole civilizations.
 
2012-07-04 03:13:02 PM  
Even the article said that such a condition of sentence is only possible if the defendant agrees.

It's no different than requiring AA meetings or other "alternative" punishments.

And, believe it or not, the Bible can be viewed as a work of literature worthy of study.
 
2012-07-04 03:29:55 PM  

Earguy: Even the article said that such a condition of sentence is only possible if the defendant agrees.


"8 years and study the Bible, do you agree"

"no"

"10 years it is then"
 
2012-07-04 03:31:02 PM  
On a separate note, did someone die or was injured? 8 years seems like alot for just being pulled over and blowing over the limit?
 
2012-07-04 03:34:42 PM  

Earguy: Even the article said that such a condition of sentence is only possible if the defendant agrees.

It's no different than requiring AA meetings or other "alternative" punishments.

And, believe it or not, the Bible can be viewed as a work of literature worthy of study.


Of course it's no different than AA. AA is faith-based.
 
2012-07-04 03:36:12 PM  

kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.


Job is a rejection of retributative justice; I'm not sure what the judge means that to imply in the context of an 8 year prison sentence. Maybe he means something like, "I think you're scum. But maybe God disagrees." Which is probably as close to thinking like a Christian as a Baptist is likely to get.
 
2012-07-04 03:37:16 PM  

mrshowrules: On a separate note, did someone die or was injured? 8 years seems like alot for just being pulled over and blowing over the limit?


FTFA:

Last November, Tolley drove on the wrong side of the road one night and crashed into another car, seriously injuring two men. At the time of the accident, Tolley's blood alcohol level was 0.333, which is over four times the legal limit.
 
2012-07-04 03:49:30 PM  

jbuist: mrshowrules: On a separate note, did someone die or was injured? 8 years seems like alot for just being pulled over and blowing over the limit?

FTFA:

Last November, Tolley drove on the wrong side of the road one night and crashed into another car, seriously injuring two men. At the time of the accident, Tolley's blood alcohol level was 0.333, which is over four times the legal limit.


OK. Well 8+ years seems appropriate.
 
2012-07-04 04:56:24 PM  
But remember kiddies: the evil muslims are the ones trying to implement sharia law.
 
2012-07-04 04:58:19 PM  
Ah yes, cruel or unusual punishment.

It's OK at the state level. I'm sure Ron Paul thinks so.
 
2012-07-04 05:02:55 PM  
So he's supposed to read a book about a dude who, through no fault of his own, suffers a series of horrors sent to settle a bet between God and the Devil? And when he complains about it, God says "Who the fark are you to talk? Have you slain any sea monsters lately? Until you do, STFU Job!"

/Good, that will teach the offender personal responsibility.
 
2012-07-04 05:03:06 PM  
Considering that Judges regular force people the the religious group AA for drunk driving for years now this is hardly news.
 
2012-07-04 05:06:08 PM  
When is South Carolina going to get its own tag?
 
2012-07-04 05:06:09 PM  

gingerjet: Considering that Judges regular force people the the religious group AA for drunk driving for years now this is hardly news.


Sentencing someone to bible study != mandating AA or NA meetings. This action is illegal under the US Constitution Bill of Rights.

Nice try.
 
2012-07-04 05:06:24 PM  
If we lived in a just and lawful society, he would be immediately disbarred.
 
2012-07-04 05:07:20 PM  
Imagine a father who allowed their child to be tortured by somebody else for the sole purpose of seeing if the child would still love the father or not. Does that sound like good parenting? Does it sound reasonable to you? Does it fit your definition of a loving parent?

Such a father would be arrested and put in prison for such clearly evil, monstrous deeds.

Unless, of course, you're talking about God and Job; then you're expected cast aside every notion of right and wrong and call it the book "Holy".

You're a twisted one, your honor.
 
2012-07-04 05:08:39 PM  
Not here to parrot everything already said that's obvious, waiting for our loyal patriots to come in and say how us liberals are missing the point in that the decline of Christian values mirrors the rampant societal degradation that led to the intemperance and hooliganism of this drunk driver.
 
2012-07-04 05:13:38 PM  
In all fairness she has eight years to do it. If I had that much time with minimal distractions I'd write a most trollish report on the OT and strike a publishing deal.
 
2012-07-04 05:14:16 PM  

gingerjet: Considering that Judges regular force people the the religious group AA for drunk driving for years now this is hardly news.


I came here to say this.

AA is farking bullshiat!

/just ask Pen and Teller.
//don't drink.
///and yet I post on fark.
 
2012-07-04 05:20:01 PM  

mauricecano: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.

A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.


And I'm willing to bet that if the judge is stupid enough to do that he'll see that sentence overturned as well as biased against the defendant.

whidbey: gingerjet: Considering that Judges regular force people the the religious group AA for drunk driving for years now this is hardly news.

Sentencing someone to bible study != mandating AA or NA meetings. This action is illegal under the US Constitution Bill of Rights.

Nice try.



Both actions are illegal. See Inouye vs. Kemna for AA. A judge can be sued for that bullshiat.
 
2012-07-04 05:22:35 PM  
No thanks, I'll just go to jail.
 
2012-07-04 05:23:16 PM  

kid_icarus: I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book,


He probably wants her to listen to her husband.
 
2012-07-04 05:25:16 PM  

ArkAngel: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.

The defendant acquiesced to the sentence.

As for the Book of Job, perhaps the defendant had been drinking because something bad happened to her recently.


God does come off as something of an idiot. He let's the adversary goad Him into torturing one of His very best followers. And God comes off as needlessly cruel, too. I am not sure why the judge would be going for that.
 
2012-07-04 05:28:13 PM  

Raharu: gingerjet: Considering that Judges regular force people the the religious group AA for drunk driving for years now this is hardly news.

I came here to say this.

AA is farking bullshiat!

/just ask Pen and Teller.
//don't drink.
///and yet I post on fark.


Doesnt even matter if it is a religion. It doesnt work. period.
This is the SCIENCE part (which AA people will reject).

Link
This article is MESSY, but full of links to studies so has some value.

Link
nice interview at the bottom ...

Cracks me up when people defend their cult.
Shudder.
One of my sisters lost her life to AA and AL-ANON. She has no time for family or life outside of her cult. Kind of sucks.
 
2012-07-04 05:29:02 PM  
"Under normal circumstances, the judge wouldn't have the authority to do that ... You can't just arbitrarily add anything you want to a sentence," said Gaines in an interview with The Herald of Rock Hill.

"But if she consented, it's really not an issue. It's critical that the defendant was in entire agreement with it."


And who, standing before a judge who holds a portion of that person's life in his hands, is seriously going to consider challenging or refusing his sentence? I wouldn't be surprised, given the location, if she'd consider it a just sentence, but I know plenty of people who wouldn't.
 
2012-07-04 05:29:52 PM  
Also, why are all you guys being idiotic about this?

Things to consider:

1. You can swear on a Bible in court.

2. Many, many people are Christian.

3. HOLY FARK but jail does suck a long salty cock, and so will you if you go there male or female.


How do you know the Judge didn't offer her the choice of books and she chose the Bible or asked her if she IS a Christian? If you are luck enough to be sentenced to Bible study, STFU and get the hell out of court and ask a priest for his opinion on the relevant passage to crib from.
 
2012-07-04 05:31:16 PM  
 
2012-07-04 05:31:28 PM  

kid_icarus: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: mrshowrules: mauricecano: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.

A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.

I've read my share of Grisham novels, I know how this works. Seriously though, I guess I'm trying too hard to figure out the motivation of a judge to do something so stupid.

*Shrug*, I think it's actually pretty easy, and akin to the judges making certain offenders stand outside wearing signs as a part of their judgement. The judge believes that it might drive the point home to the person more and/or reform them...in this case, you have a southern judge (very important point there) who believes this bible study penance will help reform this woman. And the funny part is...being that she's from the south as well and probably has some religious background, it's entirely possible it might. Not because the scripture has a ...


I agree with your objection to the sentence, but why don't you like the Book of Job? If not as a work of faith then as a work of literature, at least? It addresses in a fairly direct manner the "Phelps Family Bad Things Happen to People Because Sin/ G-ds' Primary Role is Punishment" types. Recall, that Jobs' friends come to him and insist that he must have committed some sin to bring these afflictions upon himself. Job, however, remains steadfast in his understanding that he has not sinned and is righteous. So, may we, in the modern world, understand that our entire trailer park being lifted off to the next state is not in and of itself evidence of our sinfullness or G-ds' anger against us.
 
2012-07-04 05:31:40 PM  
There is nothing wrong with studying the Bible. It is a fundamental book for western culture, narrative, and politics. Studying it is fundamental to understanding metaphors, language in general, art, gender norms, and social organization in Europe and its former colonies.

Sentencing someone to a necessary component of a comprehensive education is rather a good idea. Not everyone can hack it in a liberal arts seminar, so why not send some people to a less formal Bible study?
 
2012-07-04 05:32:23 PM  

pueblonative: mauricecano: mrshowrules: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.

Way to open the door for a first amendment appeal that has the whole sentencing thrown out. If I was truly cynical, I would think the judge included this "poison pill" on purpose in the sentencing as a favour to the defense/convict.

A sentence being thrown out is nothing, the appeals court just sends it back down to be re-sentenced without the offending provision. This type of sentence will not get the defendant off nor make him avoid a jail term. This isn't a favor that can be used on any sort of appeals and since it will be sent back to the same judge if overturned, I"m willing to bet he sees more jail time as allowed within the guidelines.

And I'm willing to bet that if the judge is stupid enough to do that he'll see that sentence overturned as well as biased against the defendant.

whidbey: gingerjet: Considering that Judges regular force people the the religious group AA for drunk driving for years now this is hardly news.

Sentencing someone to bible study != mandating AA or NA meetings. This action is illegal under the US Constitution Bill of Rights.

Nice try.


Both actions are illegal. See Inouye vs. Kemna for AA. A judge can be sued for that bullshiat.


I think a lot judges don't realize these programs are faith based even scientology has a alcohol/drug programs on the list in almost every court in the US that seems to trick people into taking because it's not "Christian".
 
2012-07-04 05:32:26 PM  
I don't think the defendant's consent is relevant if the judge gave anything in exchange for it. You're in custody, you're facing forced confinement, so anything you agree to to get a better deal is not voluntary, it's compulsory. People are jailed for refusing to testify and released when they finally agree to.
 
2012-07-04 05:33:16 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: There is nothing wrong with studying the Bible. It is a fundamental book for western culture, narrative, and politics. Studying it is fundamental to understanding metaphors, language in general, art, gender norms, and social organization in Europe and its former colonies.

Sentencing someone to a necessary component of a comprehensive education is rather a good idea. Not everyone can hack it in a liberal arts seminar, so why not send some people to a less formal Bible study?


Why not a comparative religion adult education class? If the goal is to educate him in all those things you mentioned.
 
2012-07-04 05:36:35 PM  

FloydA: kid_icarus: Circuit Court Judge Michael Nettles of Rock Hill has included in his sentencing of Cassandra Tolley the assignment of reading through the Book of Job and then writing a summary on the Old Testament Scripture.

You know, I could almost be okay with this if he'd assigned her to study something like Proverbs or the teachings of Jesus (which for the most part contain a lot of universal, practical wisdom). I'm a little unsure what he expects her to glean from such an obscure old testament book, though, that is essentially a Jewish fable.


I always thought that Job was an elaborate joke, but somewhere along the way, people stopped getting it, and now they think it's "holy" and are afraid to laugh.


I once led study of it in a religious education class for 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders with some very advanced readers and extremely bright kids, in general. It was a laugh riot. First, they insisted on pronouncing Job in the same way you would say "I'm out of work. I need to find a job." They ate up the dark themes with glee and asked to act it out! There was much giggling and collapsing into fits of laughter. Sometimes, I miss teaching religious education, but mostly I'm glad to not have that responsibility anymore.
 
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