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(CNN)   Co-founder of Gobbler Green in LA asked her employees if they want health insurance. All but two said "no", the others said "maybe". "They'd rather spend it on a movie or dinner"   (money.cnn.com) divider line 98
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3340 clicks; posted to Business » on 02 Jul 2012 at 10:30 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-02 09:43:11 PM
Because 20somethings are really smart and thinking of the future
 
2012-07-02 10:04:03 PM

cretinbob: Because 20somethings are really smart and thinking of the future

 
2012-07-02 10:23:05 PM
Yah, I don't believe that. I'd be curious to know how the question was phrased.

"Do you want health insurance if it means lower profits and the possibility of lay offs? No? Good."
 
2012-07-02 10:33:22 PM
I'm your overload, white Republican boss and you are all my brown little biatch slaves. How many of you disagree with me?

Anyone? Two, maybe?
 
2012-07-02 10:35:58 PM

Garm: cretinbob: Because 20somethings are really smart and thinking of the future


I may not be a smart 20something, but even I knew to get insurance when my company offered it to me.
 
2012-07-02 10:41:41 PM
Many of my young coworkers opted out of both the 401K *and* the insurance. And one has already been hospitalized. I'm sure that's worked out nicely.
 
2012-07-02 10:42:21 PM
Who needs insurance when you can get free care at the emergency room? Sure they send bills, but you can just throw those away.
 
2012-07-02 10:43:01 PM
"would you like health insurance? Yes? Ok, but, that means we have to cut your wages. So now you don't want it? Ok."
 
2012-07-02 10:44:24 PM
 
2012-07-02 10:49:24 PM

atomic-age: Many of my young coworkers opted out of both the 401K *and* the insurance. And one has already been hospitalized. I'm sure that's worked out nicely.


Under the current system it pays not to be insured. Just go to the ER and dont pay the bill. When/if they sue, file bankruptcy
 
2012-07-02 10:50:14 PM
Why would anyone turn down health insurance if their company offered it? I rarely get sick, but I still think the $90ish/month I pay for my wife and I is worth it.

For example, just after I started at my company, I had a horrible toothache. Turns out I had to get all of my wisdom teeth removed. Without insurance, surgery would've cost around $4k; with insurance, it cost me $700.
 
2012-07-02 10:53:45 PM

bearcats1983: but I still think the $90ish/month I pay for my wife and I is worth it.


Maybe because you are only paying $90 a month?

/pss.... that's kindda low
 
2012-07-02 11:00:45 PM

Jacobin: Under the current system it pays not to be insured. Just go to the ER and dont pay the bill. When/if they sue, file bankruptcy


Maybe they're using the money they could be using for insurance to pay down their student loans?
If they die, they don't have to worry about their loans anymore.
 
2012-07-02 11:02:52 PM
Maybe she only hires stupid people.
 
2012-07-02 11:09:10 PM
Last month, she asked her staff whether they'd want health insurance, and all but two said no. The others said maybe.

Calling shenanigans.
 
2012-07-02 11:13:44 PM
It was probably, "how would you like to have a $6,000/year pay cut for the possibility of needing it during a catastrophic medical event, but you have to pay an additional $6,000 out of pocket before this "insurance" kicks in?"

/my wife's company actually offered this as health insurance
//That one bill would have been 20% of our total income.
 
2012-07-02 11:16:11 PM

mr lawson: bearcats1983: but I still think the $90ish/month I pay for my wife and I is worth it.

Maybe because you are only paying $90 a month?

/pss.... that's kindda low


Now that I think about it, it's probably more like $135-140. We pay around $95 for just the medical insurance. We also have dental, eye, and life. Either way, worth every penny.

I can see how these costs might be prohibitive for some though. It's just not something I'd ever risk.
 
2012-07-02 11:24:11 PM

ajgeek: It was probably, "how would you like to have a $6,000/year pay cut for the possibility of needing it during a catastrophic medical event, but you have to pay an additional $6,000 out of pocket before this "insurance" kicks in?"

/my wife's company actually offered this as health insurance
//That one bill would have been 20% of our total income.


My fiance has an option that kicks in at 5000. costs $150/month. Her position in the company caps at 12 an hour. It's a joke.
 
2012-07-02 11:25:55 PM
"I told the slaves they can leave the plantation if they want and my people are under orders to not kill them, and they just looked at me with blank expressions! It's their natural state, people!"
 
2012-07-02 11:27:11 PM
Unfortunately, so many people rejected health insurance because they weren't sick that we're now stuck with the individual mandate.

I'm all for personal responsibility, but it works both ways -- if people don't behave responsibly, that responsibility becomes legislated.
 
2012-07-02 11:29:57 PM

bearcats1983: mr lawson: bearcats1983: but I still think the $90ish/month I pay for my wife and I is worth it.

Maybe because you are only paying $90 a month?

/pss.... that's kindda low

Now that I think about it, it's probably more like $135-140. We pay around $95 for just the medical insurance. We also have dental, eye, and life. Either way, worth every penny.

I can see how these costs might be prohibitive for some though. It's just not something I'd ever risk.


You've never looked at the rates on family plans, have you? If you're paying ~$1600 a year for all three of those for two people, you're paying far less than the average family pays. For businesses that can't afford great plans and the employees a footing large parts of the bill, people would kill to pay that little.

As an anecdote, a young relative of mine was going to pay $400 for health insurance alone, with only a non-important pre-condition.

It's worse the worse your business is. When you get down into the 3 - 4 people range, the health care plans become asinine (try $200 / mo for a perfectly healthy individual, unless you want deductibles through the roof).

/individual insurance for a healthy, non-smoking, non-drinking family member in his 20s average quoted at $300 / mo last year
 
2012-07-02 11:32:32 PM
3rd anecdote for you I almost forgot, bearcats, a very in shape friend of mine who had a wrist surgery: $800 a month. (That was after 3 agencies refused to even cover her).

All three of those people are far healthier than I am, and their insurance rates are insanely higher than mine, all due to the "size" of their plans.

One of the better things about working for a big company is the plans often rock.
 
2012-07-02 11:33:58 PM

mr lawson: "would you like health insurance? Yes? Ok, but, that means we have to cut your wages. So now you don't want it? Ok."


If the average person doesn't want x dollars of their pay going towards an insurance policy worth at least x dollars, then why do so many employers offer it?
 
2012-07-02 11:36:47 PM
For that matter, where does the industry get any customers from if we believe that to be the case?
 
2012-07-02 11:40:23 PM

bearcats1983: mr lawson: bearcats1983: but I still think the $90ish/month I pay for my wife and I is worth it.

Maybe because you are only paying $90 a month?

/pss.... that's kindda low

Now that I think about it, it's probably more like $135-140. We pay around $95 for just the medical insurance. We also have dental, eye, and life. Either way, worth every penny.

I can see how these costs might be prohibitive for some though. It's just not something I'd ever risk.


Okay, first of all, if your insurance premiums are that low, then they are being heavily subsidized by your employer. Secondly, for people just barely making ends meet, $135 to $140, or even $95, can be prohibitive, especially when that money could make the difference between keeping the lights on or food on the table. People who do well for themselves don't seem to have any concept of that.
 
2012-07-02 11:44:24 PM

Jacobin: atomic-age: Many of my young coworkers opted out of both the 401K *and* the insurance. And one has already been hospitalized. I'm sure that's worked out nicely.

Under the current system it pays not to be insured. Just go to the ER and dont pay the bill. When/if they sue, file bankruptcy


And that is why we need the mandate. Otherwise the freeloaders will drain the bank.
 
2012-07-02 11:50:31 PM

Fark Me To Tears: Okay, first of all, if your insurance premiums are that low, then they are being heavily subsidized by your employer. Secondly, for people just barely making ends meet, $135 to $140, or even $95, can be prohibitive, especially when that money could make the difference between keeping the lights on or food on the table. People who do well for themselves don't seem to have any concept of that.


People who make this argument don't seem to understand that there are subsidies in this bill for just such a situation. We're not all for having a guy who makes $26k pay $150 a month in insurance. We're all for making him pay maybe a few percent of that, and subsidizing him with tax dollars from those more well-off. Where's the problem?
 
2012-07-03 12:03:20 AM

Jacobin: atomic-age: Many of my young coworkers opted out of both the 401K *and* the insurance. And one has already been hospitalized. I'm sure that's worked out nicely.

Under the current system it pays not to be insured. Just go to the ER and dont pay the bill. When/if they sue, file bankruptcy


You're right. Becoming critically ill before you see a doctor is usually the best route.
 
2012-07-03 12:05:14 AM

MrEricSir: Unfortunately, so many people rejected health insurance because they weren't sick that we're now stuck with the individual mandate.

I'm all for personal responsibility, but it works both ways -- if people don't behave responsibly, that responsibility becomes legislated.


Citation?

I'm sure this has happened, but I believe these are the exceptions. Most folks who don't get insurance from an employer simply can't afford a private insurance plan ($800 a month is a lot if you're making $10 an hour) or have a preexisting condition which keep them from getting insurance (such as, for example, even having seen a shrink).

LarryDan43: Who needs insurance when you can get free care at the emergency room? Sure they send bills, but you can just throw those away.


Well, you don't just walk into the ER and say "I'd like a colonoscopy - I have a family history of colon cancer and heard early detection is vital to survival" and actually get the procedure. You have to wait until your shiatting blood.
 
2012-07-03 12:08:07 AM

cameroncrazy1984: at.

People who make this argument don't seem to understand that there are subsidies in this bill for just such a situation. We're not all for having a guy who makes $26k pay $150 a month in insurance. We're all for making him pay maybe a few percent of that, and subsidizing him with tax dollars from those more well-off. Where's the problem?


I shouldn't have to pay tax dollars so some poor guy can have a good time.
 
2012-07-03 12:14:25 AM

Aar1012: Garm: cretinbob: Because 20somethings are really smart and thinking of the future

I may not be a smart 20something, but even I knew to get insurance when my company offered it to me.


I obviously was generalizing, as there certainly are some intelligent 20somethings.

//I missed an awesome stock offering at $14/share that split 6 times in the first year............
 
2012-07-03 12:35:09 AM

cretinbob: Aar1012: Garm: cretinbob: Because 20somethings are really smart and thinking of the future

I may not be a smart 20something, but even I knew to get insurance when my company offered it to me.

I obviously was generalizing, as there certainly are some intelligent 20somethings.

//I missed an awesome stock offering at $14/share that split 6 times in the first year............


No, I agree with you. There are people in my generation that are pants-on-head stupid.

'If I pay for insurance then that's money out of myocket at the club!'
 
2012-07-03 12:41:36 AM

FitzShivering: 3rd anecdote for you I almost forgot, bearcats, a very in shape friend of mine who had a wrist surgery: $800 a month. (That was after 3 agencies refused to even cover her).

All three of those people are far healthier than I am, and their insurance rates are insanely higher than mine, all due to the "size" of their plans.

One of the better things about working for a big company is the plans often rock.


I always thought that too. My husband works for a well known international defense company. Our policy for a family of 5 costs $176 a paycheck. We have to pay $1200 each out of pocket before the insurance kicks in. After we hit that cap we have to pay 20% of the bill. Once that 20% equals $2400 they pay 100%. So we can potentially be out of pocket $12000 a year. I know it is not the worst policy out there but I expected something better from a company that big. Our one son sees a therapist once a week so if makes for a damn expensive few months when the policy deductibles reset. I'm afraid to go to the damn doctor unless I'm almost dead because it is $110 or so plus medicine.
 
2012-07-03 01:03:06 AM
FTFA: "They're single, young, healthy. They'd rather spend it on a movie or dinner," Clary said. "The government probably shouldn't be telling us what to buy."

So I suppose you rebel by not buying auto insurance, not wearing your seat belt, and cutting the labels off of mattresses?

We EACH pay $74/month for medical, dental, vision, life, and increased short term disability that covers the entire family. We have a $500 deductible, with a $1500 out of pocket max for the family. Because we're double covered, we're on the hook for the first $500 per person, and everything above and beyond is FREE.

/CSB
//suck it, whiners.
///I could laugh until I piss myself
////your employer probably sucks
 
2012-07-03 01:05:03 AM
Edit: $74 per pay check for 25 pay checks. Two pay periods each year are not docked for our benefits. This works out essentially to $148/month. Still, dirt cheap and excellent coverage.
 
2012-07-03 01:05:15 AM
I don't want health insurance "provided by my employer" either. I would rather have that money in pocket so that I can choose my own insurance plan, which I have. It's quite good, better than any plan ever purchased for me by any employer, and I pay less for this plan than I paid in premiums for my last "employer provided" plan. Why? Because my employer was fully of old unhealthy people, average cost of health care was $18k/yr, of which I paid $8k. Now insurance for myself and my daughter is $350/mo and I pay less over-all for my health care and have a much lower deductible than I had previously. If my employer offered me the money instead of the plan I'd almost always take it. Unfortunately it doesn't work that way in most places.
 
2012-07-03 01:12:08 AM

Sergeant Grumbles: Jacobin: Under the current system it pays not to be insured. Just go to the ER and dont pay the bill. When/if they sue, file bankruptcy

Maybe they're using the money they could be using for insurance to pay down their student loans?
If they die, they don't have to worry about their loans anymore.


Normally they are in deferment. But i get what you are saying

The middle class was a great thing
 
2012-07-03 01:26:42 AM

atomic-age: Many of my young coworkers opted out of both the 401K *and* the insurance. And one has already been hospitalized. I'm sure that's worked out nicely.


I've seen the same behavior. Shockingly stupid. And the 401k had a match. I mean, turning down free money!
 
2012-07-03 01:43:34 AM
I actually felt kinda bad for the insurance provider at my last job. We were a small company - maybe fifteen people. One guy had had two heart attacks before 35 and was diabetic. Another had a degenerative eye disease. About half the company smoked. Then I was hired, my wife got pregnant and the baby came early and spent a while in the NICU. I'm actually surprised they didn't just drop us.
 
2012-07-03 02:00:00 AM
Single (engaged, sorry ladies), 29 year old male with no pre-existing issues.

15 person company. I have a say in our health insurance. HQ'd in NY - I live in SC.

$320/mo for Medical and Dental (after company subsidizing). That was last year. They just raised rates another $50/mo, doubled the cost of seeing a specialist, threw almost everything except for a regular Dr visit into coinsurance/deductible status, raised out of pocket to $3000 from $2500, and dropped all additional services like Wellness, Chiropractor, etc.

This wasn't us trying to save money. This was what they told us the plan was transitioning to or we could go piss up a rope.

And yet it's still better than what the shiatheels at Oxford had us on 2 years ago.

Can't wait to get married in April and get on the fiancee's state benefits.
 
2012-07-03 02:01:00 AM
Oh, and just so we have the unsubsidized number to be fair - $607/mo for just Medical.

fark you, Aetna.
 
2012-07-03 02:14:00 AM
When I worked retail at the mall after high school, I had two ER visits (both where they did very little before sending me home) and no insurance. I'm incredibly grateful my husband has me on his insurance now, especially since he's a state employee. It's not just for usual little stuff, either; I had to have two laparascopic abdominal surgeries, the second with an over night stay at the hospital. That insurance has paid for itself about three times over since he's only worked there about four years. It's a damn shame this country is owned by those companies and the average, non-gov't employee either can't afford it at all or else gets screwed by the higher premiums.
 
2012-07-03 02:22:12 AM

AppleOptionEsc: ajgeek: It was probably, "how would you like to have a $6,000/year pay cut for the possibility of needing it during a catastrophic medical event, but you have to pay an additional $6,000 out of pocket before this "insurance" kicks in?"

/my wife's company actually offered this as health insurance
//That one bill would have been 20% of our total income.

My fiance has an option that kicks in at 5000. costs $150/month. Her position in the company caps at 12 an hour. It's a joke.


That is not a good option for her. On the other hand, her declining to pay for insurance, then waiting until her medical problem is very severe and expensive, then sticking me and others with insurance with her bill, is not a good option for me or the rest of us with insurance.
 
2012-07-03 03:15:56 AM

MrJesus: Single (engaged, sorry ladies), 29 year old male with no pre-existing issues.

15 person company. I have a say in our health insurance. HQ'd in NY - I live in SC.

$320/mo for Medical and Dental (after company subsidizing). That was last year. They just raised rates another $50/mo, doubled the cost of seeing a specialist, threw almost everything except for a regular Dr visit into coinsurance/deductible status, raised out of pocket to $3000 from $2500, and dropped all additional services like Wellness, Chiropractor, etc.

This wasn't us trying to save money. This was what they told us the plan was transitioning to or we could go piss up a rope.

And yet it's still better than what the shiatheels at Oxford had us on 2 years ago.

Can't wait to get married in April and get on the fiancee's state benefits.


Well not everybody is fortunate enough to have a fiancee that's in prison.
 
2012-07-03 03:29:07 AM

mr lawson: "would you like health insurance? Yes? Ok, but, that means we have to cut your wages. So now you don't want it? Ok."


I hate to tell you this, but no employer "gives" his employees health insurance. The money to pay for it must come out of the employee's earnings.

You can prove this yourself:
1) buy a company
2) determine, for each employee (including yourself), how much money the company makes
3) pay each person that much
4) now, without taking any money from the employee, buy health insurance for each employee

C) file bankruptcy

/the answer is always "C."
 
2012-07-03 03:40:43 AM
the highest goal most people seem to have
is to live long enuf to be put in a nursing home

if you have the money, spend it as you like.
but curse the sob that forces in any way, me spending my time or money the way they think i should

if you dont want people recieving care without it being paid for. then dont give the care. easy.

(let darwin out more - and yes i live by it (when i die i will still know where i am))
 
2012-07-03 03:41:20 AM

DrPainMD: mr lawson: "would you like health insurance? Yes? Ok, but, that means we have to cut your wages. So now you don't want it? Ok."

I hate to tell you this, but no employer "gives" his employees health insurance. The money to pay for it must come out of the employee's earnings.

You can prove this yourself:
1) buy a company
2) determine, for each employee (including yourself), how much money the company makes
3) pay each person that much
4) now, without taking any money from the employee, buy health insurance for each employee

C) file bankruptcy

/the answer is always "C."


You have a really weird delusion of how a business is run.

/Strawman Inc.
 
2012-07-03 03:57:15 AM

DrPainMD: C) file bankruptcy


You don't really understand how things like revenues and expenses work do you?
 
2012-07-03 04:08:03 AM

atomic-age: Many of my young coworkers opted out of both the 401K *and* the insurance. And one has already been hospitalized. I'm sure that's worked out nicely.


Did they opt out or not opt in? Many programs are being set up because most people don't like to choose (plus, all the damn legalese).

If they did opt out, was their some incentive to? I personally let myself get auto-enrolled in a 401K at my last job (it auto-enrolled at the company contribution, a measly 1%).
 
2012-07-03 04:45:18 AM

bronyaur1: AppleOptionEsc: ajgeek: It was probably, "how would you like to have a $6,000/year pay cut for the possibility of needing it during a catastrophic medical event, but you have to pay an additional $6,000 out of pocket before this "insurance" kicks in?"

/my wife's company actually offered this as health insurance
//That one bill would have been 20% of our total income.

My fiance has an option that kicks in at 5000. costs $150/month. Her position in the company caps at 12 an hour. It's a joke.

That is not a good option for her. On the other hand, her declining to pay for insurance, then waiting until her medical problem is very severe and expensive, then sticking me and others with insurance with her bill, is not a good option for me or the rest of us with insurance.


Um. Couldn't she decline the company's awful plan and shop around for better coverage herself?
 
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