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(CNN)   8 things the US could learn from Mexico's election system. #9 should be a free taco for everyone who votes   (globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com) divider line 75
    More: Interesting, Institutional Revolutionary Party, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Center for Democracy, President of Mexico, electoral systems, American Universities, electoral fraud, poll workers  
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2328 clicks; posted to Politics » on 02 Jul 2012 at 8:23 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-02 07:49:37 PM
First things first.

Are the tacos going to be good or this bullcrap stuff from taco bell.
 
2012-07-02 08:25:19 PM
Am I the only one that's bummed that it took THIS long for us to get a Mexican election thread?

And I agree with Party Boy. What kind of tacos are we talking about here?
 
2012-07-02 08:26:54 PM
Chipotle makes them pretty decently, I hear.

If they can make them like the street vendors I've had in Mexico, then I vote those.
 
2012-07-02 08:28:29 PM

Party Boy: Are the tacos going to be good or this bullcrap stuff from taco bell.



Soft shell -- nothing but the seasoned meat, some onion and cilantro.

/aw yeah
 
2012-07-02 08:29:36 PM
No voter id laws, just pull a gun or a head from a bag?
 
2012-07-02 08:33:18 PM
gymnasticscoaching.com
 
2012-07-02 08:33:25 PM
Do free sandwiches count?
static7.businessinsider.com
 
2012-07-02 08:35:15 PM
Racism, in my Fark headlines?

More likely than you think.
 
2012-07-02 08:35:15 PM

jim32rr: No voter id laws, just pull a gun or a head from a bag?


TFA: Registration and identification of voters. IFE actively registers about 95% of 77 million eligible voters and gives each a biometric, photo ID card, which Mexicans use as a primary identification. The registration list is audited regularly, and the photos of the voters are on the list in each polling site.

In contrast, U.S. states and communities passively register about 55% of eligible voters, and the lists are flawed with many duplicates and errors, especially between states and counties. Each state has different rules, and in states where Republicans have a majority, their focus on preventing electoral fraud has led them to restrict registration and require IDs, while Democrats are more concerned about voters' access and believe the Republican ID laws are aimed to suppress voter turnout from poor people or minorities. The truth is that we ought to adopt Mexico's national, biometric ID system. That would eliminate duplicates and simplify the registration and voting process.
 
2012-07-02 08:40:19 PM

Shaggy_C: Racism, in my Fark headlines?

More likely than you think.


Yes, and I'm sure there are just couples and couples of people (probably not even Mexican) who are offended by it.
 
2012-07-02 08:46:02 PM
FTFA: "Mexico views the conduct of elections like Americans view jury duty - a civic obligation - and they recruit on a random basis a large number of people from each district."

That's....actually a really good idea.
 
2012-07-02 08:46:58 PM
img526.imageshack.us
 
2012-07-02 09:00:23 PM

djkutch: jim32rr: No voter id laws, just pull a gun or a head from a bag?

TFA: Registration and identification of voters. IFE actively registers about 95% of 77 million eligible voters and gives each a biometric, photo ID card, which Mexicans use as a primary identification. The registration list is audited regularly, and the photos of the voters are on the list in each polling site.

In contrast, U.S. states and communities passively register about 55% of eligible voters, and the lists are flawed with many duplicates and errors, especially between states and counties. Each state has different rules, and in states where Republicans have a majority, their focus on preventing electoral fraud has led them to restrict registration and require IDs, while Democrats are more concerned about voters' access and believe the Republican ID laws are aimed to suppress voter turnout from poor people or minorities. The truth is that we ought to adopt Mexico's national, biometric ID system. That would eliminate duplicates and simplify the registration and voting process.


Interesting...try to implement that here and the wailing would begin
 
2012-07-02 09:04:55 PM
PRI won? Awesome. I love This American Life
 
2012-07-02 09:07:14 PM

casual disregard: FTFA: "Mexico views the conduct of elections like Americans view jury duty - a civic obligation - and they recruit on a random basis a large number of people from each district."

That's....actually a really good idea.


if we were to implement this I would do think we should have 2 requirements

No serving in your voting district

Pay 2x Minimum wage
 
2012-07-02 09:08:47 PM

jim32rr: Interesting...try to implement that here and the wailing would begin


I can hear the Republicans now: "Biowhatrics? Mark of The Beast! FEMA CONCENTRATION CAMPS!!!!"
 
2012-07-02 09:13:34 PM
The thing submitter is forgetting is that there is a certain party in this country that doesn't want everyone to vote.
 
2012-07-02 09:16:52 PM

Pincy: The thing submitter is forgetting is that there is a certain party in this country that doesn't want everyone to vote.


Would that be the same party that supports Voter I.D. legislation yet, strangely, opposed Motor Voter legislation?
 
2012-07-02 09:32:15 PM
Wow, makes me wish I lived in a democracy.
 
2012-07-02 09:35:56 PM
9. Voting on the FARKING WEEKEND!
 
2012-07-02 09:39:00 PM

MikeMc: Pincy: The thing submitter is forgetting is that there is a certain party in this country that doesn't want everyone to vote.

Would that be the same party that supports Voter I.D. legislation yet, strangely, opposed Motor Voter legislation?


My cars motor votes every election.
Usually writes in some B.S. name (Herbie or General Lee for example) for the local elections, but dammit all if it isn't the most right-winged, hateful, reactionary voter when it comes to things at the State and Federal levels.
 
2012-07-02 09:40:08 PM
Excellent FA
 
2012-07-02 09:49:17 PM
s-ak.buzzfed.com
 
2012-07-02 10:18:21 PM

casual disregard: FTFA: "Mexico views the conduct of elections like Americans view jury duty - a civic obligation - and they recruit on a random basis a large number of people from each district."

That's....actually a really good idea.


Or you can do like Oregon and have universal vote-by-mail, which is a brilliant idea.
 
2012-07-02 10:32:08 PM
Forget the Republicrats and Demoblicans not willing to let go of their power over the elections, the main reason it will never take on in the US:

9. No booze can be sold on election week-end.
 
2012-07-02 10:33:08 PM
This should be interesting to watch. I hope Nieto can fix what ails Mexico. I love that country, and I would love to go back and visit again when it's safe.

/and we're related to him!
 
2012-07-02 10:43:55 PM
Who do I vote for to make this happen? I need my free tacos.
 
2012-07-02 10:44:20 PM
"i always offer to pay then in tacos...they get a kick outtadat!"

Better not be obscure.
 
2012-07-02 10:44:30 PM
CNN Headline: Mexico falls into civil war after election is suspended
 
2012-07-02 10:46:21 PM

Shaggy_C: Racism, in my Fark headlines?


The fact that tacos are from Mexico is now racist?
 
2012-07-02 10:49:35 PM

ciderczar: Who do I vote for to make this happen? I need my free tacos.


images.icanhascheezburger.com
 
2012-07-02 11:04:21 PM
He forgot the most important thing, bringing in playboy models during the debates.
 
2012-07-02 11:15:42 PM
How about free beer?*

farm9.staticflickr.com

/offer not available until 3012
 
2012-07-02 11:17:59 PM
This would never work in America. Not only is one party completely devoted to ensuring that only the right kind of people vote, but free tacos would anger the nativist crowd that would prefer something like free fried chicken.
 
2012-07-02 11:49:13 PM
The main question asked about the Mexican presidential elections on July 1 is whether victory by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) means that Mexico will return to its authoritarian past.

What an absurd statement. Mexico will be what it always has been, whatever the United States wants and manipulates it into being. It's that simple.
 
2012-07-03 12:04:02 AM
That comment section escalated into a border war rather quickly.
 
2012-07-03 12:19:47 AM
I get a kick out of any assertion that there can exist a non-partisan agency made of partisan people. Non-partisan seemingly just means you pretend not to have a political bent.
 
2012-07-03 12:23:57 AM
The amazing thing is, I actually have no issue with the points brought up in the article...which is weird for a Townhall post.

I'm sober too...but I want these damn tacos
 
2012-07-03 12:45:30 AM
jackiechanv8gongsound.png
 
2012-07-03 12:57:54 AM

Party Boy: First things first.

Are the tacos going to be good or this bullcrap stuff from taco bell.


Free for every voter? Yeah, I'm sure they'll be banquet-quality. I don't even trust Arby's 5 for 5 deal, you can keep your mass-produced-then-sittin-in-a-garbage-bag-all-day death tacos.

Shaggy_C: Racism, in my Fark headlines?

More likely than you think.


You know what NPR reported were being sold on street corners in Mexico when the results were announced? Coffee mugs and tequila shot glasses. Man, those Mexicans sure hate Mexicans, Sandy_C.
 
2012-07-03 01:10:40 AM
The problem with equalizing funding for promotion is that the parties with the most corrupt system for raising money gets a big jump on the rest when it comes to buying coverage and placement on the two corrupt television stations that most Mexicans can receive. Clicky-pop.
 
2012-07-03 01:11:16 AM

Flab: Forget the Republicrats and Demoblicans not willing to let go of their power over the elections, the main reason it will never take on in the US:

9. No booze can be sold on election week-end.


Very few states ban alcohol sales on Election Day. Per Wikipedia, only Alaska, Massachusetts, South Carolina, and Utah have some form of ban.
 
2012-07-03 01:11:25 AM

doctor wu: The main question asked about the Mexican presidential elections on July 1 is whether victory by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) means that Mexico will return to its authoritarian past.

What an absurd statement. Mexico will be what it always has been, whatever the United States wants and manipulates it into being. It's that simple.


yup. I won't for one minute believe mexicans favor prohibition at this point.
 
2012-07-03 01:11:51 AM
It's amazing that these things would somehow be considered fascinating 'out-of-the-box' ideas in a country like the United States.

For the record, here at home:

Elections are administered by a non-partisan, independent agency - Elections Canada.

Voters are registered by ticking a box on your tax return, or by calling a 1-800 number, or by showing up on Election Day. Essentially everyone is on the list. There is no need to register a party preference.

Polling stations are staffed by trained volunteers, overseen by a 'Returning Officer' who reports to a professional 'Chief Returning Officer,' and on up the chain. Fortunately, the process is very simple:

- 3-4 weeks before the election you will receive a voter card in the mail. It will tell you where and when to vote.
- If you do not receive your card, call Elections Canada. They will put you on the list, and send you one.
- Take your card to the poll. If you don't have one, take ID, or a couple of utility bills with address. At the very least, two people on the list can vouch for you.
- Hand the poll worker your card. They cross your name off the list with a pen and ruler, and hand you a ballot.
- Go to the table and mark with pencil the candidate you're voting for. In federal or provincial elections, there is only one thing to select, Member of Parliament.
- Fold your ballot and hand it to the worker. They detach the receipt, and hand you the ballot. You put the ballot into the box.

Not much training required. Any problems with the list can be dealt with by the returning officer, and escalated as necessary. Problems are extremely rare.

Contributions to political parties are limited to $1000 per person, per year. Contributions from corporations and unions are strictly forbidden. There are strict limits on campaign spending by national parties and individual candidates. PACs and Super PACs do not exist.

Election campaigns are legally limited to a maximum of 36 days.
 
2012-07-03 01:12:43 AM
A clapped-out drug-war-battered third world country can furnish its citizens with biometric IDs and require them for voting, while critics in the US think that would be the second coming of Jim Crow, the poll tax, eugenics, and the Third Reich. This is your brain on leftist manufactured hysteria.

i48.tinypic.com
 
2012-07-03 01:33:57 AM
The Mexican electoral system is in fact very good. All the corruption takes place once elected, not during.

The American electoral system is grotesque, even when working properly, it is an archaic relic from colonial times. And not to be undone, the system is quite corrupt, just look at the congressional hearings on rigged voting machines...
 
2012-07-03 02:03:39 AM
You could learn all of these lessons from Canada (or any other democracy) except for the foreign observers. Canada sends foreign observers but I don't believe it receives them, although a few ridings could use some each election.

One point missed, and it is one of the most important, is the need for a paper trail. I vote my marking a ballot with a pencil. You have to really trust the system to believe a mark with a pencil is going to be tallied, and I have seen plenty of evidence that it almost always is in the form of third party candidates winning on a regular basis regardless of party affiliation.

In Canada volunteers from two or three parties sit at each polling table. They are there to keep each other honest.

Registration is easy--you can tick a box on your tax form. Most people eligible to vote fill out tax forms, if only because they want the tax rebate cheques for dependants and sales tax. Thus voters are automatically registered every year and the voting registers are largely up-to-date except for people who move frequently. You can vote by showing ID and filling out a form and swearing an oath. These votes are tallied in the event of a close race, I believe, or else more slowly than other votes. In either case, they still count. There are a number of documents such as a lease, driver's licence, or a Health Care Card that can be used to show identity. Almost everybody has these and there are very few people turned away from voting because they lack proper ID or registration.

Get your shiat together America. You're supposed to be a light unto us heathens, but more often you are a disgrace on Election Day and for months afterwards in some particularly eggregious cases.

Politics is too important to be left to partisan politickers. There should be impartial professionals involved and also lots of accountability and transparency.

I suggest that it would be a good idea for ballots to have a receipt which the voter can use to check the vote tallied against the vote cast (this is easy to do electronically, using double-blind codes like they use with medical tests). Then you would have your receipt to confirm that your vote was tallied correctly, and could complain if you think it wasn't. Any election in which a sufficiently large number of voters (close to the margin of win) complained would be automatically suspect and subject to review.

In Canada, if a close race is challenged or in doubt, recounts are automatic and a race can be thrown back to the electors in a by-election if fault is found with the campaigns or polling.

The system isn't perfect or tamper-proof, but as a general rule it works with less partisan shenanigans and BS than in most states in the USA. Hey, even Mexico can hold an election with decent levels of accountability and transparency, and they were a one party state for over seventy years.
 
2012-07-03 02:34:18 AM
Other than the batshiat insane candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, elections in Mexico and the electoral system are pretty good. Many vendors had free stuff for the people that voted (as evidenced by an inked-up thumb) and overall people were really passionate about this particular election as the leading candidate, Enrique Pena Nieto, is a very polarizing figure and his socialist counterpart elicits large waves of support from poor people that believe in him as a demigod.

As good as the electoral system is overall, things are very tense in Mexico at the moment and it could get ugly pretty fast. Stay tuned for Wednesday when the official results come out because the outrage on some circles will be pretty bad.
 
2012-07-03 03:09:55 AM

pippi longstocking: The Mexican electoral system is in fact very good. All the corruption takes place once elected, not during.

The American electoral system is grotesque, even when working properly, it is an archaic relic from colonial times. And not to be undone, the system is quite corrupt, just look at the congressional hearings on rigged voting machines...


Actually, during the election there were a lot of the old moves from the PRI.

Dissapearing ballots, buying votes, attacking civilian observers, changing electoral committees, removing data, these were some of the things we saw these last elections. On my end, I was a secretary of my section, and I only noticed a few: Certain ballot ID numbers were not right, a few people were not on the nominal list.

#YoSoy132, and we are farking angry.
 
2012-07-03 05:05:23 AM
Let's just ignore the vote fraud then shall we?

http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/02/world/americas/mexico-election-impact/i n dex.html
 
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