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(BBC-US)   Subby was wondering recently how many Lego bricks it would take to build a real house and also what it would cost. Speak of the Devil and he shall appear   (bbc.com) divider line 42
    More: Cool, Lego, square footage  
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8367 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Jul 2012 at 4:46 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-02 12:06:32 AM
Meh. James May actually built a two-floor house out of Lego. They could have just asked him.
 
2012-07-02 01:11:53 AM
And the worst part is when the contractor needs ONE specific piece, but your last one is buried in the bottom of the bucket.
 
2012-07-02 02:27:56 AM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: And the worst part is when the contractor needs ONE specific piece, but your last one is buried in the bottom of the bucket.


LOL
 
2012-07-02 04:54:14 AM
Buying enough to build the shell of a new build UK home, which on average has an area of about 79 square meters (850 square feet), would cost about £1.1m. Far more than the average price of £199,016 for a semi-detached house built of real bricks.

That's not as bad as I thought, so enough blocks to create an equivalent volume of a single brick is only six times more. Was expecting far greater.
 
2012-07-02 05:43:20 AM
Old new is old. I bought the book about the BBC house for my dad last year.
 
2012-07-02 07:04:02 AM
Subby: she.

/FTFY
 
2012-07-02 07:10:46 AM
www.geeky-gadgets.com
(ahem)
 
2012-07-02 07:16:14 AM
In before people indignantly point out that James May did it without reading the article and seeing he's mentioned in it....

Darn. Too slow.
 
2012-07-02 07:34:25 AM
Yes but will chicks want to see the bricks?
 
2012-07-02 08:05:41 AM
news.bbcimg.co.uk

An entire house made of Legos, and this is the single picture we get with TFA.
 
2012-07-02 08:14:20 AM
All this really shows people is that Legos ( >: D ) are too expensive.
 
2012-07-02 08:33:47 AM
I house in which every step is a step on legos? No thanks.
 
2012-07-02 08:39:18 AM
The average UK home is only 850 sqft?
 
2012-07-02 08:40:12 AM
You poor gouged British slobs. My 2500 sqft home only cost me 175k
 
2012-07-02 08:45:44 AM

Mytch: I house in which every step is a step on legos? No thanks.


Unless you have the smooth tile legos. So you aren't stepping on legos that hurt.
 
2012-07-02 09:18:03 AM
I'd be real curious to see the schematic of the floor from May's house. IIRC, it took a lot of planning to allow it to take significant weight.
 
2012-07-02 09:24:17 AM

Subtle_Canary: You poor gouged British slobs. My 2500 sqft home only cost me 175k


Show a little international duplomacy.
 
2012-07-02 09:30:40 AM
"... how many Lego bricks it would take to build a real house and also what it would cost..."

A lot.

And a lot.
 
2012-07-02 09:53:44 AM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [news.bbcimg.co.uk image 304x228]

An entire house made of Legos, and this is the single picture we get with TFA.


Just out of curiosity, why didn't the structure collapse under the sheer weight of the blocks? I figure that would happen if you ever try to build something as large as a real house.
 
2012-07-02 10:01:06 AM

PsyLord: I figure that would happen if you ever try to build something as large as a real house.


Well Lego bricks are fairly light and quite strong and can take quite a bit of a load. Granted building a floor out of Lego bricks presents some challenges if it's not a ground floor, but, as for the structure itself supporting itself, isn't much of a problem.
 
2012-07-02 10:06:50 AM
15m bricks at a cost of $1.5m...

I wonder how much if I use the bigger Duplo blocks.

Or those cheaper, lead filled knock off ones.
 
2012-07-02 10:15:19 AM
How much to build one out of gingerbread. You know, for the ex.
 
2012-07-02 10:17:45 AM
Does that include the cost of land, or just the structure?
 
2012-07-02 10:31:23 AM

UNC_Samurai: I'd be real curious to see the schematic of the floor from May's house. IIRC, it took a lot of planning to allow it to take significant weight.


Yea, the man does his homework for that program. I watched one that was about building a full scale Spitfire from a model kit. It is a very interesting program.
 
2012-07-02 10:57:53 AM
I imagine that once you were about to go purchase that many bricks, you could ring up Lego HQ and say, "Hey, I want to buy this many bricks, for this purpose. We could even turn it into a publicity stunt to get the Lego name in the news. What sort of deal are you willing to cut me?"
 
2012-07-02 11:03:13 AM
I was disappointed to find that it only figures the cost of the outside. It could get quite complicated to put in the full details of your house. Even just the outside of my house isn't that easy. Only two sides don't have rooms jutting out. I've got 14 exterior walls.
 
2012-07-02 11:09:01 AM

Subtle_Canary: You poor gouged British slobs. My 2500 sqft home only cost me 175k


It does seem a little on the small side. My guess would be that includes apartments - London is full of crappy 100 square foot bedsits.
 
2012-07-02 11:10:43 AM

Terrified Asexual Forcemeat: Yes but will chicks want to see the bricks?


"Chicks with bricks come, chicks with blocks come / chicks with bricks and blocks and clocks come"
 
2012-07-02 11:27:52 AM
Just stopping by to say that James May is awesome.

And to share the Lego house episode of "James May's Toy Stories."

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5
 
2012-07-02 11:32:08 AM

Tobin_Lam: I've got 14 exterior walls.


I hope you live in a moderate climate -- sounds like a biatch to heat/cool...
 
2012-07-02 11:59:23 AM
stoopit me only knew Mr.May from TV. his new godlike status includes a free home cooked meal and many a drink.
 
2012-07-02 12:37:32 PM
Wheres the calculator??
 
2012-07-02 12:39:31 PM

AndreMA: Tobin_Lam: I've got 14 exterior walls.

I hope you live in a moderate climate -- sounds like a biatch to heat/cool...


It actually isn't that bad, even for Texas. I got a tree that shades most of the south side during the summer and, of course, doesn't it during the winter and I've got a house next door on the west side that shades the that side. The house maintains 73 fairly easily. I love the setup I've got.
 
2012-07-02 12:47:26 PM
British housing is much smaller than American, Australian, or Canadian homes. This is partly because much of it is older, while even newer homes tend to be smaller because of the high cost of heating and cooling. British homes are often poorly insulated because the builders can't recoop the cost of insulation from buyers. British homes have roughly the same number of rooms, but the rooms are much smaller. Building codes may make a difference also, as they vary greatly.

A lot of new American and Canadian houses are built of very low quality materials (particle board, very thin lumber) and using slap-dash builiding techniques (glue and staples rather than nails). Even the monster homes that sell to the well-to-do upper middle classes are not very well-built--they are simply larger and have more expensive finishing materials such as thin granite or marble counters.

Americans and Canadians are much more likely to own their homes, while more British residents rent.

The average size of a house in Canada in 1945 was a bit over 800 square feet, but they grew to 1075 square feet by 1975 and 1800 square feet in 2003. Today, the average Canadian home is just slightly larger than the average US home in terms of the number of rooms, if not square footage.

http://www.darrenbarefoot.com/archives/2006/01/what-is-the-average-si z e-of-a-house-in-canada.html

Here is a graphic comparing home sizes in square meters:

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/average-home-sizes-around-the-151738

As you can see, the British have the least space. There are historical reasons for this, economic, political, social. A lot of people in London, like New Yorkers, do almost all their living outside of their flat. They may not even have a kitchen and eat all of their meals out. This was true even a century or two ago, as the poor would get their meals from "bake houses" which cooked your roast for you, and the middle-classes and well-to-do would throw dinner parties with rented servants, catered food, and even show-dishes that were put on the table but not served to the guests. The same dishes might do for several dinners--in fact, if you got your dinner parties catered by the same firm, you might see the same dishes you "offered" to your friends offered to you at their homes.

There is a tremendous disparity of housing in the UK even today, as the super-rich have palaces and the poor live in state-owned council houses. This discourages home ownership, which discourages investment in maintenance and improvements. Thus many people in the UK are underhoused because of "socialism". In other words, if they owned their own homes, they'd spend a lot more money on them and add annexes, extra rooms, etc.

Despite small rooms, the British produce twice as much CO2 per capita as Germans and the French, suggesting that they are doing something to compensate for their tiny homes. Judging from what I have seen of France, it may be heating their homes in the winter.

French rooms are cold. That is why you should chill your red wines just a little bit if you are serving them in American or Canadian rooms. Our room temperature is quite a bit higher than French room temperature.
 
2012-07-02 12:58:44 PM

brantgoose: French rooms are cold. That is why you should chill your red wines just a little bit if you are serving them in American or Canadian rooms. Our room temperature is quite a bit higher than French room temperature.


That may be true but wine should be served, not chilled, but at cellar temperature, generally around 55F. Too warm and it tastes like crap, too cold and it shocks your tastebuds and even a good bottle tastes the same as a cheap one.
 
2012-07-02 01:26:00 PM
Walking barefooted inside the LEGO house must suck.
 
2012-07-02 02:47:15 PM

brantgoose: Despite small rooms, the British produce twice as much CO2 per capita as Germans and the French, suggesting that they are doing something to compensate for their tiny homes. Judging from what I have seen of France, it may be heating their homes in the winter.


UK CO2 emissions per capita are a bit lower than Germany's, so I'm not sure where you got that from.

The small square-footage isn't a problem providing you don't try to cram far more rooms into it than the space can reasonably support. Unfortunately, that's exactly what modern builders like to do, because houses are sold by the number of rooms. My working class grandmother's terraced house was maybe 800 square feet, but was perfectly comfortable, with a decent sized living room and 2 bedroom. Now it wouldn't surprise me to see a builder try and squeeze four bedrooms into that space.
 
2012-07-02 03:22:30 PM
Oh yea that building deffiiinniitteely looks like it could withstand ANYTHING that mother nature throws at it.

/i bet the roof leaks constantly
 
2012-07-02 05:40:01 PM
James May's house was both amusing and sad.

The amusing bit was the brown lego block floating in the lego toilet.

The sad bit was complete lack of any forward planning. Built in a farmer's field; farmer predictably needed the land so house had to go; house couldn't be moved in one piece so they wound up ripping it all apart

(incl bonus pics of house)
 
2012-07-02 05:46:53 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Legos


wildsnowllama: Legos


Mytch: legos


yves0010: legos


AAAARRRRGGGHHH!!!!

FFS, people, For the canteenth time... The Plural of LEGO is legoes. *sigh*

/domesticated irk.
 
2012-07-02 06:48:55 PM

mjjt: James May's house was both amusing and sad.

The amusing bit was the brown lego block floating in the lego toilet.

The sad bit was complete lack of any forward planning. Built in a farmer's field; farmer predictably needed the land so house had to go; house couldn't be moved in one piece so they wound up ripping it all apart

(incl bonus pics of house)


If the house had collapsed during use, then I doubt they would have wanted to have a permanent pile of Legos out there. I'm sure it was just done at that location because it was cheap to borrow the land for a while.
 
2012-07-03 06:52:44 AM

wildsnowllama: All this really shows people is that Legos ( >: D ) are too expensive.


THIS

Seriously, why is something made of plastic extruded at the rate of thousands a second so freakin expensive?

I love Legos but this I don't understand.

Also I refuse to say 'Lego bricks' or 'Lego toys' when referring to the plural of Legos, so corporate can suck it.
 
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