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(Newser)   43% watch TV or a movie; 35% do chores around the house; 24% have a drink; 20% play video games. Answer C) What telecommuters really do at home   (newser.com) divider line 137
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5199 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Jul 2012 at 6:09 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-01 03:56:11 PM
And I'm still more productive than your sorry ass stuck in the office. This is a classic win/win.
 
2012-07-01 04:44:19 PM
WTF? Who cares what they do. At least they're employed.

And they forgot to mention:
People working from home can take care of kids or elderly parents
Care for home-bound veterans
ect. ect.

plus
Saving gas
One less bus rider
One less car on the road
One less person in line in front of you at McDonald's
ect. ect.
 
2012-07-01 06:10:03 PM
I do the work assigned to me before the deadline assessed. I don't care- and nor should anyone else- if it takes me 2 hours/day, 15 hours/day, whatever.

The whole notion of the 40 hour work week is silly in most industries.

When I was a manager at a multmedia shop... my attitude was this:

"Here's the project. Get it done by July 14th. I don't care if you come in at 3pm and stay all night. I don't care if you want to come in at 5am, and leave earlier than normal to spend time with your kids, I don't care if you do some of it at home. Just get it done without bothering me."

Everyone on my team was different, what good would it have been for me to force them to conform to an 8 hour day/40 hour week?

Some of them liked to crack some beers and work damn near overnight. Some of them liked the prospect of going home at 1pm. Whatever floats your boat.

Personally, I'm not good at working in full stretches. I'd come in for a few hours here and there... morning, middle of the day, night, weekends. Probably averaged something close to 30-50 hours a week, but I personally never took count. I just got my shiat done and on time.
 
2012-07-01 06:11:18 PM

EvilEgg: And I'm still more productive than your sorry ass stuck in the office. This is a classic win/win.


This. Especially when I'm on 24/7 call, like this week. The time I could be commuting is time I'm providing valuable company assistance, by answering stupid questions that somehow made it through the first two tiers of support.

/"what do you mean if I set a feed to type A, it won't show up on the type-B feed?"
//golfclap
///nscsb
 
2012-07-01 06:13:15 PM
Been working from home for about a year now and loving it. Usually have the television on all day or music if not, and take frequent video game breaks.
 
2012-07-01 06:13:52 PM
FWIW, I start a stopwatch on the computer. When I do what I would normally do at the office, I run the timer, including going to the bathroom, but not lunch or naps.
 
2012-07-01 06:14:30 PM

downstairs: I do the work assigned to me before the deadline assessed. I don't care- and nor should anyone else- if it takes me 2 hours/day, 15 hours/day, whatever.

The whole notion of the 40 hour work week is silly in most industries.

When I was a manager at a multmedia shop... my attitude was this:

"Here's the project. Get it done by July 14th. I don't care if you come in at 3pm and stay all night. I don't care if you want to come in at 5am, and leave earlier than normal to spend time with your kids, I don't care if you do some of it at home. Just get it done without bothering me."

Everyone on my team was different, what good would it have been for me to force them to conform to an 8 hour day/40 hour week?

Some of them liked to crack some beers and work damn near overnight. Some of them liked the prospect of going home at 1pm. Whatever floats your boat.

Personally, I'm not good at working in full stretches. I'd come in for a few hours here and there... morning, middle of the day, night, weekends. Probably averaged something close to 30-50 hours a week, but I personally never took count. I just got my shiat done and on time.


Pretty much this.

Unless you're going to start paying me for effort instead of results just let me know what you want done and when you need it done and let me get it done as I see fit.
 
2012-07-01 06:14:41 PM
Office worker problems.
 
2012-07-01 06:15:08 PM
I'd answer 911 from my couch if I could.

"Your wife isn't breathing?"
*pause DVR*
 
2012-07-01 06:16:02 PM
try drawing/colouring comics. you're lucky to eat...
 
2012-07-01 06:16:13 PM
What is the point of this article? Scare on the fence managers into forcing their flock into the pens for the prescribed time? A real manager knows for thought-driven jobs, often times there is no "shutting off" working, thus encouraging life (watching a movie, making dinner, drinking a beer, having a nooner with the wife) doesn't detract from the quality of the work produced, if anything it increases it. It's posts like these that keep humpster managers from pulling the trigger and actually seeing gains through telecommuting.
 
2012-07-01 06:16:14 PM
How the Fark am I gonna work at home? No one's gonna bring their A/C to me!
As for working in an 'office' - Pencilneck pencil pushers - get a real job!
 
2012-07-01 06:17:48 PM
I don't have the type of work where i could work from home.

That being said- I don't really want to know what you are doing at home as long as you are completing your share of the assigned work. Great list of benefits although high level of satisfaction left out.
 
2012-07-01 06:17:52 PM
Doing the call center jazz right now which offers the work at home deal as long as you meet an insane quota of stats. What other jobs out there offer this sort of thing, because being polite to idiots 40 hours a week is not my perfect idea of a potential career.
 
2012-07-01 06:18:25 PM

Godscrack: WTF? Who cares what they do. At least they're employed..


Their employers might.

/works in a lab, kinda hard to get biohazardous stuff shipped to my apartment.
 
2012-07-01 06:20:24 PM

EvilEgg: And I'm still more productive than your sorry ass stuck in the office. This is a classic win/win.


Ding ding ding! We have a winner!

I telecommuted for 3 years. Got more done than my in-office co-workers because there aren't anywhere near the number of distractions. Farked off all the time. I did half of my phone meetings and calling from the beach.

Only time I ever screwed up was when I turned on the blender without hitting the mute button on the phone first. Good news was there were 10 people on the conference call, so I quickly blamed someone else and then kept quiet and sipped my drink.
 
2012-07-01 06:20:44 PM
I call BS on the article researcher who had to live in his office in the basement 80 hours a week.

When I worked for a large company from home 80% of the time, they got more tons of work out of me then then when in the office. With IM, VPN, and conference calls, I was more available from home then I was in the office. Not to mention the lack of the one hour commute each way daily. It also enhanced my after hours availability by a factor of ten as I could be online and functional for issues 24/7 in five minutes time. And as a problem resolution manager, that is more important than gold for many companies.
 
2012-07-01 06:21:11 PM
43% watch TV or a movie; 35% do chores around the house; 24% have a drink; 20% play video games

I'm watching TV (or rather, listening to TV), while keeping track of my dinner that's in the stove, and playing quick games of halo whenever I'm waiting for another batch of data to download from the DB before I can analyze it.

// My job involves a lot of thinking, which means even if I were at work, I would wander out of my office and stroll around the building while trying to wrap my head around a difficult problem. Eventually I'll hit a eureka moment, and rush back to my office to try the fix I thought of.

// There is also some down time, where I'm loading 10 million + rows out of a database to build a report. I wish everything was in Netezza. I usually have two projects open at once (one on each screen). And even that isn't enough to fully occupy me sometimes because I'll hit a point in each where I need to load data. And the shortest DB load takes 15 minutes. TEA TIME!
 
2012-07-01 06:22:46 PM

downstairs: I do the work assigned to me before the deadline assessed. I don't care- and nor should anyone else- if it takes me 2 hours/day, 15 hours/day, whatever.

The whole notion of the 40 hour work week is silly in most industries.

When I was a manager at a multmedia shop... my attitude was this:

"Here's the project. Get it done by July 14th. I don't care if you come in at 3pm and stay all night. I don't care if you want to come in at 5am, and leave earlier than normal to spend time with your kids, I don't care if you do some of it at home. Just get it done without bothering me."

Everyone on my team was different, what good would it have been for me to force them to conform to an 8 hour day/40 hour week?

Some of them liked to crack some beers and work damn near overnight. Some of them liked the prospect of going home at 1pm. Whatever floats your boat.

Personally, I'm not good at working in full stretches. I'd come in for a few hours here and there... morning, middle of the day, night, weekends. Probably averaged something close to 30-50 hours a week, but I personally never took count. I just got my shiat done and on time.


While I agree with this type of management, it does not always work. Some jobs do require people to all be available from 8 to 5 so that people can work together and communicate in a timely fashion.
 
2012-07-01 06:23:18 PM
As long as they're getting the required work done, who cares what they do? My last boss was like that, despite having everything done that needed to be done for the day, god forbid he catch you sitting in the break room for the last 30-45 minutes of the day. Pretending to look busy is an art form most people with an idiot boss learn quickly.
 
2012-07-01 06:23:21 PM

mandoskippy: What is the point of this article? Scare on the fence managers into forcing their flock into the pens for the prescribed time? A real manager knows for thought-driven jobs, often times there is no "shutting off" working, thus encouraging life (watching a movie, making dinner, drinking a beer, having a nooner with the wife) doesn't detract from the quality of the work produced, if anything it increases it. It's posts like these that keep humpster managers from pulling the trigger and actually seeing gains through telecommuting.


Exactly. Nothing worse than a "make work" manager.

Heck, when I was a manager... I distinctly remember thinking that being a "make work" manager would be a hell of a lot *worse* for me. I don't want to run around finding useless projects for someone who got their project done 3 days ahead of schedule. Know what? Take the next three days off, enjoy! Just be in contact if something breaks or whatever.

Again, this applies only to certain industries. I fully understand when I was a grocery store clerk... I was a warm body there to throw 70 cases/hour... and it had to be done at specific times of the day. All good there.

But anything project based... let people do it how they see fit, as long as they produce quality work and get it done by the deadline. That's it. The end.
 
2012-07-01 06:24:19 PM
I was actually doing real work from home before the evil Fark dragged me in :)

Actually this is a good break-time activity as long as I set my timer.
 
2012-07-01 06:26:56 PM

tarhammer: EvilEgg: And I'm still more productive than your sorry ass stuck in the office. This is a classic win/win.

Ding ding ding! We have a winner!

I telecommuted for 3 years. Got more done than my in-office co-workers because there aren't anywhere near the number of distractions. Farked off all the time. I did half of my phone meetings and calling from the beach.

Only time I ever screwed up was when I turned on the blender without hitting the mute button on the phone first. Good news was there were 10 people on the conference call, so I quickly blamed someone else and then kept quiet and sipped my drink.


Lol... I quickly learned to set my grandaddy clock 2 minutes in front of actual time so that it wouldn't go off at the start of a conference call. Another benefit of working from home.

Another benefit of working from home? You will almost always be able to be more punctual. No peer annoyance except by IM, and you can set that to currently busy.
 
2012-07-01 06:27:41 PM

shtychkn: While I agree with this type of management, it does not always work. Some jobs do require people to all be available from 8 to 5 so that people can work together and communicate in a timely fashion.


I really don't believe this is true in the sheer majority of non-labor industries.

I've run a business... dealing with all sorts of products and projects, for ma-and-pa shops, all the way up to billion dollar companies. I don't think I've had a face-to-face meeting in years. Many years. Not even with my business partner, who lives 900 miles away.

Heck, I barely use the phone anymore. I can pretty much run everything via email, and prefer it very much so to any other method of communication.
 
2012-07-01 06:27:42 PM
If you have a job such that your work when slacking off around the house is indistinguishable from actual work you would have done at the office, then your job is actally useless, but more power to you for taking advantage.
 
2012-07-01 06:29:46 PM

aerojockey: If you have a job such that your work when slacking off around the house is indistinguishable from actual work you would have done at the office, then your job is actally useless, but more power to you for taking advantage.


Jealous much? Or do you work in a factory or a food outlet?
 
2012-07-01 06:31:45 PM

CasperImproved: aerojockey: If you have a job such that your work when slacking off around the house is indistinguishable from actual work you would have done at the office, then your job is actally useless, but more power to you for taking advantage.

Jealous much?


No.
 
2012-07-01 06:31:59 PM

lordargent: My job involves a lot of thinking, which means even if I were at work, I would wander out of my office and stroll around the building while trying to wrap my head around a difficult problem. Eventually I'll hit a eureka moment, and rush back to my office to try the fix I thought of.


Yep, same here. I probably get more work done pacing around my house. Its just the way I work... Its easier for me to visualize things in my head pacing around, maybe even outside (if it weren't 100 frikkin' degrees, but I digress) than trying to plug away on the computer. And, same here... i deal with software/web development, databases, etc.

I generally can't visualize a solution staring at my code or the DB... I have to be away from it. Maybe I'm weird.
 
2012-07-01 06:32:08 PM

aerojockey: If you have a job such that your work when slacking off around the house is indistinguishable from actual work you would have done at the office, then your job is actally useless, but more power to you for taking advantage.


I doubt my CEO thinks the $2.5MM I bring into the company every year is useless. Hell, I did almost $600k in June and I had the last week of it entirely off except for the last day.

//sales problems
 
2012-07-01 06:33:04 PM
What's the point of goofing off at home? A guy I knew in junior high told me that his parents caught him smoking cigarettes, but they didn't give a shiat. He was thinking about quitting because it just wasn't as much fiun as when he had to sneak.
 
2012-07-01 06:34:37 PM

Godscrack: People working from home can take care of kids


Sorry, but if taking care of your kids is the priority (and it should be if you have them), then take a leave of absence instead of constantly pushing your work responsibilities onto others.

/pet peepee
 
2012-07-01 06:34:40 PM

MrJesus: aerojockey: If you have a job such that your work when slacking off around the house is indistinguishable from actual work you would have done at the office, then your job is actally useless, but more power to you for taking advantage.

I doubt my CEO thinks the $2.5MM I bring into the company every year is useless. Hell, I did almost $600k in June and I had the last week of it entirely off except for the last day.


You're not slacking off. What I said doesn't apply to you.
 
2012-07-01 06:35:30 PM

aerojockey: If you have a job such that your work when slacking off around the house is indistinguishable from actual work you would have done at the office, then your job is actally useless, but more power to you for taking advantage.


No, I'm not useless. I work very, very quickly. I've always been able to get projects done well before most others. Who cares... the project is done, and its done well. It took me 2 hours, it would take someone else 8 hours. Neither of us is more useful... as long as the end result is the crap is done before the deadline.

And I'm not tooting my own horn here. Its more of an anxiety thing. I hate, hate, hate being near a deadline. If the dealine is July 14th... I want to be done on July 7th so I have no worries. Otherwise I start to panic and produce crappy work.

Other people thrive on being right on the edge of the deadline. And that gets their juices flowing, and produces better work for them. More power to you.
 
2012-07-01 06:37:32 PM

downstairs: shtychkn: While I agree with this type of management, it does not always work. Some jobs do require people to all be available from 8 to 5 so that people can work together and communicate in a timely fashion.

I really don't believe this is true in the sheer majority of non-labor industries.

I've run a business... dealing with all sorts of products and projects, for ma-and-pa shops, all the way up to billion dollar companies. I don't think I've had a face-to-face meeting in years. Many years. Not even with my business partner, who lives 900 miles away.

Heck, I barely use the phone anymore. I can pretty much run everything via email, and prefer it very much so to any other method of communication.


It might not be true for every company and every job type. That is why I stated some, and not even the claim of most.

I also specifically said communication instead of face time. With video conferencing you can get all you need from face to face meetings.

The main points I was talking about was some people working from 5am to 1pm and others working from 3pm till Midnight. That isn't always an acceptable practice for people that need to work together.
 
2012-07-01 06:38:15 PM

Godscrack: ect. ect.

ect. ect.


Your spell-checker broken boy?
 
2012-07-01 06:38:20 PM
43% watch TV or a movie pr0n; 35% do chores around the house; 24% have a drink; 20% play video games

FTFY
 
2012-07-01 06:38:51 PM

MrJesus: aerojockey: If you have a job such that your work when slacking off around the house is indistinguishable from actual work you would have done at the office, then your job is actally useless, but more power to you for taking advantage.

I doubt my CEO thinks the $2.5MM I bring into the company every year is useless. Hell, I did almost $600k in June and I had the last week of it entirely off except for the last day.

//sales problems


Ok, Ricky Roma. Some of us have bad streaks. Next month, Shelley "The Machine Levene" will be back on top of the board!
 
2012-07-01 06:39:33 PM

downstairs: No, I'm not useless.


JESUS CHRIST, PEOPLE. I SAID IF YOU'RE SLACKING OFF AT HOME, NOT IF YOU'RE WORKING AT HOME. IF YOU'RE ACTUALLY WORKING AT HOME IT'S ALL GOOD. OK?
 
2012-07-01 06:40:03 PM
I have the worst of both worlds, guilt wise. I work from home, but get paid hourly. I will get a project, told they have budgeted it for say 80 hours, and then finish it in say 60 hours. Do I turn it in at 60 hours? Sure, then I am told they did not expect me to finish it til the end of the week and we don't have anything for you right now soooo... hey enjoy your unpaid days off. Or I can fark around and give it to them when they expect it and feel guilty. The paid days off are nice, but I always feel like karma is waiting to hurt me.
 
2012-07-01 06:40:55 PM
Hell, I do most of those things when I'm in the office, so why wouldn't I do them when I'm WFH? At least at home, I'm in shorts and flip flops.

Oh, wait... that's when I'm in the office, too.
 
2012-07-01 06:41:19 PM

shtychkn: The main points I was talking about was some people working from 5am to 1pm and others working from 3pm till Midnight. That isn't always an acceptable practice for people that need to work together.


Oh, of course. I'm merely saying these instances are shrinking fast. I can't think of any job anywhere near the classification of "white collar" or "office" that can't be done completely remotely. I think people *think* they need to work togther face to face, but really don't when you sit back and analyze it.

What are some examples that differ from what I'm saying here? (Again, office-based jobs. Not labor, retail, or like a poster above said... biohazzardous items in a lab)
 
2012-07-01 06:41:53 PM
I think it depends on whether your work is task-oriented or project-oriented.

I worked from home for six months, writing and editing content for a website. I had to adhere to a pretty strict schedule, or the clients would start flooding my boss and me with e-mails.
 
2012-07-01 06:43:22 PM
I've been working at my company for 10 years and telecommuting for the last 7. I've gotten good reviews and raises every year, yet I've never met my boss in person and I only saw my previous boss when we were both out of the country on business. I work in New England, my boss is in Indiana, and his boss is in New York.

In those ten years, the company has grown in market cap at an annualized rate of slightly better than 10.5% per year. We must be doing something right.
 
2012-07-01 06:45:26 PM

aerojockey: downstairs: No, I'm not useless.

JESUS CHRIST, PEOPLE. I SAID IF YOU'RE SLACKING OFF AT HOME, NOT IF YOU'RE WORKING AT HOME. IF YOU'RE ACTUALLY WORKING AT HOME IT'S ALL GOOD. OK?


How do you define slacking off vs working at home? How much of the time spent at the office is actually spent doing work? As long as the work gets done why does it matter if someone spreads it out evenly across 8 hours from 9-5 or if they wake up at 10, do a bit then, have lunch and a beer, do a little bit more, box the clown, put some more time in, maybe watch some TV, and finish it up at 11pm? The same amount of work got done each day.
 
2012-07-01 06:45:33 PM

aerojockey:

JESUS CHRIST, PEOPLE. I SAID IF YOU'RE SLACKING OFF AT HOME, NOT IF YOU'RE WORKING AT HOME. IF YOU'RE ACTUALLY WORKING AT HOME IT'S ALL GOOD. OK?


dumbimages.net
 
2012-07-01 06:46:19 PM

downstairs: I can't think of any job anywhere near the classification of "white collar" or "office" that can't be done completely remotely.


I can think of several. And the account I support does not allow remote access to the mainframe because of Privacy Laws. A lot of government accounts that hold public funds follow this rule.
 
2012-07-01 06:47:53 PM

TuteTibiImperes: aerojockey: downstairs: No, I'm not useless.

JESUS CHRIST, PEOPLE. I SAID IF YOU'RE SLACKING OFF AT HOME, NOT IF YOU'RE WORKING AT HOME. IF YOU'RE ACTUALLY WORKING AT HOME IT'S ALL GOOD. OK?

How do you define slacking off vs working at home? How much of the time spent at the office is actually spent doing work? As long as the work gets done why does it matter if someone spreads it out evenly across 8 hours from 9-5 or if they wake up at 10, do a bit then, have lunch and a beer, do a little bit more, box the clown, put some more time in, maybe watch some TV, and finish it up at 11pm? The same amount of work got done each day.


SINCE YOU PEOPLE JUST PUTTING THINGS I DIDNT SAY IN MY MOUTH WHY DONT YOU FORGET I SAID ANYTHING AT ALL ITS JUST WAY SAFER THAT WAY OK THANKS BYE
 
2012-07-01 06:48:11 PM

aerojockey: CasperImproved: aerojockey: If you have a job such that your work when slacking off around the house is indistinguishable from actual work you would have done at the office, then your job is actally useless, but more power to you for taking advantage.

Jealous much?

No.


So should I assume that work at something other then a factory or food outlet, but still requires you to be present to assume you diserve your paycheck?

And honestly I am not poking you there because I have worked for companies that assume that if they can't eye-ball you with physical eyes, they think you are not doing anything worth paying for. Some company management structures are that antiquated (and hopefully will die by attrition) they are actually costing their company productivity.
 
2012-07-01 06:48:51 PM
i291.photobucket.com
 
2012-07-01 06:49:13 PM
Huh, really? I work at home. 300 miles from the office. It's Sunday and I'm still working but nobody at the office is. They're all off doing something they seem to think is important, but here I am. Making sure the revenue keeps flowing.

Yeah, the TV's on and fark is in the browser, but shiat's getting done. Can't say that about my coworkers.
 
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