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(YouTube) Video Quickest 11-month tear down and rebuild of car engine you'll see today (bonus music: In the Hall of the Mountain King)   (youtube.com ) divider line
    More: Video, car engines, storyboard, catastrophic failure, piece of music, coffee, DSLR  
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4142 clicks; posted to Video » on 30 Jun 2012 at 11:05 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-30 09:00:53 AM  
That was very cool- thanks for the submission. I've done that myself on several Chevy 350's back in the '70's

I must still be half asleep, for some reason I was expecting this music...
Wrong king
 
2012-06-30 09:14:49 AM  
I did that once when my truck spun a bearing and I couldn't afford to have someone else fix it. I highly recommend that every man do this at least once in his life.
 
2012-06-30 10:08:51 AM  
Ok, the "leftover" parts at the end got a chuckle out of me.


/assisted in more than a few Chevy 350 rebuilds in my youth.
 
2012-06-30 10:25:28 AM  
That was fascinating. It also reinforced how little I actually know about how engines work.

/they piston burn fossils, right?
 
2012-06-30 11:27:37 AM  
Glad there are people in this world that understand how to do this. I'll never have that kind of patience and attention to detail. Cool vid!

/I want to see the same with a rotary
 
2012-06-30 11:30:12 AM  
That was unusually satisfying to watch. Nice find!
 
2012-06-30 11:51:41 AM  
Interesting find.
 
2012-06-30 11:52:09 AM  

Barfmaker: I did that once when my truck spun a bearing and I couldn't afford to have someone else fix it. I highly recommend that every man do this at least once in his life.


"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."
 
2012-06-30 12:20:33 PM  

flexflint: Barfmaker: I did that once when my truck spun a bearing and I couldn't afford to have someone else fix it. I highly recommend that every man do this at least once in his life.

"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."


Counter point: Without specialization, you wouldn't have the computer you are typing this on. How about some love for computer architects and the engineers that design, verify and validate cpus. =D
 
2012-06-30 12:25:17 PM  
The most mechanical thing I ever did was to replace a clutch in a VW Beetle and yes, there were a few leftover pieces. I really didn't have a clue what I was doing but it seemed to work fine though. Good lord, that was a lifetime ago!
 
2012-06-30 12:43:39 PM  

miss diminutive: That was fascinating. It also reinforced how little I actually know about how engines work.

/they piston burn fossils, right?


Uh..yeah. hey why don't you go grab us a couple of cold ones!?!
 
2012-06-30 12:46:04 PM  
 
2012-06-30 12:53:17 PM  

Barfmaker: I did that once when my truck spun a bearing and I couldn't afford to have someone else fix it. I highly recommend that every man do this at least once in his life.


gallery.gdatp.com

Nah, this instead.
 
2012-06-30 01:16:22 PM  
Good find, Subby. Wonder why he brush-painted the block blue after assembly? Not sure the make/modle of car, probably British?

There are always parts left over.
 
2012-06-30 01:39:12 PM  

RibbyK: Good find, Subby. Wonder why he brush-painted the block blue after assembly? Not sure the make/modle of car, probably British?

There are always parts left over.


Or holes without bolts/bolts without nuts.

/almost always
 
2012-06-30 02:02:12 PM  
It's much easier to spray paint the individual parts after they are clean and before they are assembled. Zip lock lunch bags do great for keeping bolts/nuts with their proper parts with labeling so you don't have parts left over. Chevy 350 myself as well.
 
2012-06-30 03:09:52 PM  

nvmac: RibbyK: Good find, Subby. Wonder why he brush-painted the block blue after assembly? Not sure the make/modle of car, probably British?

There are always parts left over.

Or holes without bolts/bolts without nuts.

/almost always


When I was 16, we dismantled Ricky H's six-cylinder and installed new rings. We had dozens of parts left over and it ran for about 100 yards till a piston disintegrated and dropped into the oil pan. He shrugged his shoulders and bought a new car, a 1957 Chevy 4-door when they were cheap.

I Googled Ricky a few years ago. He's serving a life sentence in Minnesota for killing his wife. That was Ricky, always messing around!
 
2012-06-30 03:14:28 PM  
11 months? I have to assume it was a pet project because that is outrageous. Sending it out for line boring, a head job and popping it out 30 over would take 4-6 weeks at max.

And why would you keep the same old valves? You are into that deep, cough up a few extra and put new ones in and lap them yourself. Crank looked like crap too, I would have sent that for cutting.

/get off my lawn garage
 
2012-06-30 03:16:36 PM  

flexflint: Barfmaker: I did that once when my truck spun a bearing and I couldn't afford to have someone else fix it. I highly recommend that every man do this at least once in his life.

"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."


~ Robert Heinlein
 
2012-06-30 03:21:03 PM  

nyseattitude: 11 months? I have to assume it was a pet project because that is outrageous. Sending it out for line boring, a head job and popping it out 30 over would take 4-6 weeks at max.

And why would you keep the same old valves? You are into that deep, cough up a few extra and put new ones in and lap them yourself. Crank looked like crap too, I would have sent that for cutting.
/get off my lawn garage


I see your point (and garage) but perhaps that was the challenge for the guy, do it on the cheap in his spare time maximizing original parts? After my nong nong brother spun a rod bearing in my 1970 GTO Judge doing bleach burn-outs the last day of school, I got a new crank. Except for curing a horrible knocking sound, it didn't run no better.

/The Pontiac warrantee guys were complete pr*cks, so I never bought another GM car.
 
2012-06-30 03:25:24 PM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: flexflint: Barfmaker: I did that once when my truck spun a bearing and I couldn't afford to have someone else fix it. I highly recommend that every man do this at least once in his life.

"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."

Counter point: Without specialization, you wouldn't have the computer you are typing this on. How about some love for computer architects and the engineers that design, verify and validate cpus. =D


You're misunderstanding it, but that's common, so don't feel bad about it. Heinlein was a man of his age, and often expressed his views in the classic mode of hyperbole, an art that's declined greatly in our age. A great many modern readers misunderstand Heinlein for this reason. It is not meant to taken word for word. Rather, it is meant to express the spiritual sense behind a meaning that the reader is meant to derive on their own from the supplied elements. Heinlein does not literally mean that every adult male human should be able to do all the specific things in that list; rather, it's a selection of what were common tasks in his day that any given man might conceivably be called upon to fulfill, though most would never be called to even most of them. Nor does he literally mean that devoting your life or studies to advanced mastery of any discrete thing render you no more respectable than an arthropod. What he means to convey is that humans are highly intelligent creatures capable of far more than most of us even aspire to, never mind pursue, and that a man could, if moved by will, dedication, and discipline, learn many worthwhile skills -- and more, that he believes that they should. It is not a literal or blanket statement, though it's understandable why it reads that way nowadays.
 
2012-06-30 03:28:20 PM  

stoppit: The most mechanical thing I ever did was to replace a clutch in a VW Beetle and yes, there were a few leftover pieces. I really didn't have a clue what I was doing but it seemed to work fine though. Good lord, that was a lifetime ago!


I used to do a lot of shadetree work, but cars have gotten too weird to work on that way now, at least for me. The spaces are much tighter, you need more special tools, the tolerances are narrower, and more and more is electronic and not very serviceable by owners. Something like a teardown is still doable, but it's much more complicated and challenging than it used to be. I think anyone wanting to do this, or anything like it, has to have access to a full shop now to even hope to be successful.
 
2012-06-30 04:33:19 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: stoppit: The most mechanical thing I ever did was to replace a clutch in a VW Beetle and yes, there were a few leftover pieces. I really didn't have a clue what I was doing but it seemed to work fine though. Good lord, that was a lifetime ago!

I used to do a lot of shadetree work, but cars have gotten too weird to work on that way now, at least for me. The spaces are much tighter, you need more special tools, the tolerances are narrower, and more and more is electronic and not very serviceable by owners. Something like a teardown is still doable, but it's much more complicated and challenging than it used to be. I think anyone wanting to do this, or anything like it, has to have access to a full shop now to even hope to be successful.


Speaking of tolerances and on a different topic - 30+ years ago, I worked on NTS-445 "mini" computers. The 10 meg drive was almost two feet in diameter. They loved them in the plant because they were tough as nails. One weekend, an unmanned office flooded and the filthy waterline was half way up the side of the 445. After a few weeks drying, they turned it on and it was fine. HUGE tolerances.As time goes ny, I find my tolerance level is getting a lot tighter too. :-) Cheers.
 
2012-06-30 06:35:32 PM  

stoppit: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: stoppit: The most mechanical thing I ever did was to replace a clutch in a VW Beetle and yes, there were a few leftover pieces. I really didn't have a clue what I was doing but it seemed to work fine though. Good lord, that was a lifetime ago!

I used to do a lot of shadetree work, but cars have gotten too weird to work on that way now, at least for me. The spaces are much tighter, you need more special tools, the tolerances are narrower, and more and more is electronic and not very serviceable by owners. Something like a teardown is still doable, but it's much more complicated and challenging than it used to be. I think anyone wanting to do this, or anything like it, has to have access to a full shop now to even hope to be successful.

Speaking of tolerances and on a different topic - 30+ years ago, I worked on NTS-445 "mini" computers. The 10 meg drive was almost two feet in diameter. They loved them in the plant because they were tough as nails. One weekend, an unmanned office flooded and the filthy waterline was half way up the side of the 445. After a few weeks drying, they turned it on and it was fine. HUGE tolerances.As time goes ny, I find my tolerance level is getting a lot tighter too. :-) Cheers.


Not as many moons ago as that, one of our cats peed on a 5.25" floppy we had some important stuff on. (I don't remember what it was, or how this was allowed to happen, but it did.) I carefully rinsed it under running lukewarm water for several minutes, then left it to dry for a few days. Worked fine. (Also, remember the trick of buying cheaper single-sided diskettes, cutting a new I/O notch on the other side by hand, and using them as double-sided?)

My very first mobile phone (and still my favourite -- a small backlit Ericsson with a clip) fell into a (clean!) toilet. I quickly popped out the battery, drained it, and let it dry three days. Worked fine.
 
2012-07-01 12:15:52 AM  
gotta check out the top comment reply thread on youtube.. classic stuff
 
2012-07-01 12:28:16 AM  
Now I want to see a time lapse of someone ordering a crate engine.
 
2012-07-01 05:57:33 AM  

RibbyK: Good find, Subby. Wonder why he brush-painted the block blue after assembly? Not sure the make/modle of car, probably British?

There are always parts left over.


I'm assuming it was sealant of some sort to protect the engine and parts within. But, as I'm not much of a car person, I have no clue.

/awesome video
//wish I had a driveway and a garage to just put together an entire car from the nuts and bolts up in
 
2012-07-01 09:54:39 AM  
Cool video, but 11 months? I just did a 4.3 V6 in two months, and I thought I was being slow and lazy.
 
2012-07-01 10:15:45 AM  
11 months? Sounds like they needed to spend less time setting up the pictures and more time working. Even with machining and taking lots of time I wouldn't expect it to be more than a month or two.

Neat build though. Shoulda just stuffed a V8 in there though.
 
2012-07-01 11:30:28 AM  

pinchpoint: Cool video, but 11 months? I just did a 4.3 V6 in two months, and I thought I was being slow and lazy.


He had a lot of salvage yards to hit?
 
2012-07-01 01:05:27 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Uchiha_Cycliste: flexflint: Barfmaker: I did that once when my truck spun a bearing and I couldn't afford to have someone else fix it. I highly recommend that every man do this at least once in his life.

"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."

Counter point: Without specialization, you wouldn't have the computer you are typing this on. How about some love for computer architects and the engineers that design, verify and validate cpus. =D

You're misunderstanding it, but that's common, so don't feel bad about it. Heinlein was a man of his age, and often expressed his views in the classic mode of hyperbole, an art that's declined greatly in our age. A great many modern readers misunderstand Heinlein for this reason. It is not meant to taken word for word. Rather, it is meant to express the spiritual sense behind a meaning that the reader is meant to derive on their own from the supplied elements. Heinlein does not literally mean that every adult male human should be able to do all the specific things in that list; rather, it's a selection of what were common tasks in his day that any given man might conceivably be called upon to fulfill, though most would never be called to even most of them. Nor does he literally mean that devoting your life or studies to advanced mastery of any discrete thing render you no more respectable than an arthropod. What he means to convey is that humans are highly intelligent creatures capable of far more than most of us even aspire to, never mind pursue, and that a man could, if moved by will, dedication, and discipline, learn many worthwhile skills -- and more, that he believes tha ...


Well, when you are right you are right. I took Heinlein as wholeheartedly discouraging specialization in favor of more rounded individuals. Further, I interpreted it as a suggestion of breadth over depth for all people. Such that, if any given person is given the option of learning new unrelated things or delving deeper into one thing, that that person should always favor the new.

I suppose it should go without saying that specialization is absolutely necessary these days, but, if Heinlein is to be listened too, the study and work involved in that pursuit should not preclude new tangential or wholly unrelated studies. I guess what he was trying to say was that I guess what he was saying was that if you do specialize in something very deeply don't let that stop you from learning other things. Your knowledge of that one thing, no matter how intricate, enviable and complicated it might be, does not excuse you from everything else that is out there in the world. Likewise, if you use that specialization as an excuse to stop intellectual pursuits, you have failed at being a learned human.

Personally, I think Heinlein was trying to warn people not to put all their eggs in one basket so to speak. While the intense focused study of a single thingy may be awesome in both what you can accomplish and how much more you know than others, it is ultimately worth very little if you are unable to get by through the rest of your life because the only thing you are capable of doing is whatever-you-specialized for.
 
2012-07-01 02:09:24 PM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: I suppose it should go without saying that specialization is absolutely necessary these days, but, if Heinlein is to be listened too, the study and work involved in that pursuit should not preclude new tangential or wholly unrelated studies. I guess what he was trying to say was that I guess what he was saying was that if you do specialize in something very deeply don't let that stop you from learning other things. Your knowledge of that one thing, no matter how intricate, enviable and complicated it might be, does not excuse you from everything else that is out there in the world. Likewise, if you use that specialization as an excuse to stop intellectual pursuits, you have failed at being a learned human.

Personally, I think Heinlein was trying to warn people not to put all their eggs in one basket so to speak. While the intense focused study of a single thingy may be awesome in both what you can accomplish and how much more you know than others, it is ultimately worth very little if you are unable to get by through the rest of your life because the only thing you are capable of doing is whatever-you-specialized for.


That's more or less the interpretation that I take from it. I also try to look at it in context of the man himself and his personal story. In the '30s, Heinlein was a Navy man, and very proud of it, but washed out due to tuberculosis in '34 (BCG vaccine was not widely adopted until after WW2). Adrift for a number of years, he became a writer almost by accident: Looking for a way to make his mortgage payments, he responded to a small writing contest he found in a pulp magazine, but decided the story might be good enough to publish, so he submitted it and it did. He followed that with a few more, and kept getting published, so he kept going with that, and that eventually became his career and then his life.

But he was never proud of it, and had never aspired to it, which means he came to writing stardom by a very different path than most successful writers who spend many years struggling to make it. A military man, he thought himself a hack for years, and writing a kind of cheating -- making money without contributing anything useful to society. He thought himself a loser, and feared that others felt sorry that he 'had' to do it to make ends meet. He was ashamed of it, and often spoke ill of the practice: One of his books opens with the line, "I hate writers." And Lazaraus Long (along with Jubal Harshaw, one of Heinlein's in-narrative spokesmen) said, "Writing is not inherently sinful, but you should do it in private and wash your hands after." It wasn't until much later in his career that he came to respect himself as a writer, long after many others did, once he realised that it was a useful vehicle for communicating some of his heartfelt ideas about society. (Before writing he'd also tried a turn at politicking.)

Part of this was also due to the fact that at that time (mid-'30s), science fiction was not respected writing generally. He was one of the first SF writers to break out of the pulp model into 'real' publishing, blazing the trail for many others. Before guys like him, no writer was considered respectable who made his living writing science fiction.

So I think part of the background to the quote that may aid in interpreting it is that it was written by a man who had, for a few years of his life, directly experienced was it was to be alive but useless (in his assessment, anyway -- he referred to his discharge as having been declared "an official waste of space"), and the deep personal shame that came from that. From that, he earnestly felt that, as you say, all 'men' (remember also that in his time this word commonly referred to all adult humans, not just males) owed it to themselves and others to be all they could be at all times, to constantly challenge themselves to learn as much as they could, no matter what their native expertise. He'd bet everything on his Naval career, and was very good at it. (He was a radio officer under a famous captain on a famous ship -- the '30s equivalent of Lt. Uhura. And one amusing short story has him staying in and later becoming a Heinlein-style space admiral, thanks in no small part to his fictional political influence.) But it all fell away just because he got sick and couldn't be cured in time to save that career. I think he spent years afterwards thinking about how it could have been different if he'd only had more foresight and prepared himself better. In the years he spent recovering in hospital (enough that he designed an advanced therapeutic waterbed from the experience), he probably spent a great deal of time pondering this.
 
2012-07-01 03:18:47 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Uchiha_Cycliste: I suppose it should go without saying that specialization is absolutely necessary these days, but, if Heinlein is to be listened too, the study and work involved in that pursuit should not preclude new tangential or wholly unrelated studies. I guess what he was trying to say was that I guess what he was saying was that if you do specialize in something very deeply don't let that stop you from learning other things. Your knowledge of that one thing, no matter how intricate, enviable and complicated it might be, does not excuse you from everything else that is out there in the world. Likewise, if you use that specialization as an excuse to stop intellectual pursuits, you have failed at being a learned human.

Personally, I think Heinlein was trying to warn people not to put all their eggs in one basket so to speak. While the intense focused study of a single thingy may be awesome in both what you can accomplish and how much more you know than others, it is ultimately worth very little if you are unable to get by through the rest of your life because the only thing you are capable of doing is whatever-you-specialized for.

That's more or less the interpretation that I take from it. I also try to look at it in context of the man himself and his personal story. In the '30s, Heinlein was a Navy man, and very proud of it, but washed out due to tuberculosis in '34 (BCG vaccine was not widely adopted until after WW2). Adrift for a number of years, he became a writer almost by accident: Looking for a way to make his mortgage payments, he responded to a small writing contest he found in a pulp magazine, but decided the story might be good enough to publish, so he submitted it and it did. He followed that with a few more, and kept getting published, so he kept going with that, and that eventually became his career and then his life.

But he was never proud of it, and had never aspired to it, which means he came to writing stardom by a very different path than ...


I would wager ,more so than anything else, Heinlein's views were shaped by the age he lived in. He was 7 when WWI broke out. Technology as we know it today was only a fantasy. In such a time specialization likely meant both buttonholing yourself and not being very (if at all) productive within the scope of helping your country or fellow man. As he grew e would have seen many places where people were needed for many reasons and likely would have seen the distinct advantage of having numerous skills. Especially during the great depression and WWII.
Heinlein could not possibly have groked what the later decades of the twentieth century would hold in store for us. Consequently, he would urge others to be able to take care of themselves no matter what happened.

If you can imagine a global depression or a global war standing at our finger tips, it really helps to understand what he was thinking. These were periods of unspeakable crisis. Uncertainty and suffering that threatened not people, not neighborhoods, but the whole country. It only made sense to want and need to be able to assist your fellowman in every way possible.

I think the relative stability of the last 50 years, along with the enormous advantage we had at the end of WWII, with our industrial and manufacturing capacity not being destroyed by the war, specialization is both more reasonable and in many cases necessary these days. The mind-boggling complexity of modern electronics from CPUs up are a testament to this.

I think his advice is good, but it was much better long ago. Granted all it takes is a war or depression to change all that.

Finally, wouldn't HG Wells have been considered both respectable and a sci-fi writer?
 
2012-07-01 04:20:18 PM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: I would wager ,more so than anything else, Heinlein's views were shaped by the age he lived in. He was 7 when WWI broke out. Technology as we know it today was only a fantasy. In such a time specialization likely meant both buttonholing yourself and not being very (if at all) productive within the scope of helping your country or fellow man. As he grew e would have seen many places where people were needed for many reasons and likely would have seen the distinct advantage of having numerous skills. Especially during the great depression and WWII.
Heinlein could not possibly have groked what the later decades of the twentieth century would hold in store for us. Consequently, he would urge others to be able to take care of themselves no matter what happened.

If you can imagine a global depression or a global war standing at our finger tips, it really helps to understand what he was thinking. These were periods of unspeakable crisis. Uncertainty and suffering that threatened not people, not neighborhoods, but the whole country. It only made sense to want and need to be able to assist your fellowman in every way possible.

I think the relative stability of the last 50 years, along with the enormous advantage we had at the end of WWII, with our industrial and manufacturing capacity not being destroyed by the war, specialization is both more reasonable and in many cases necessary these days. The mind-boggling complexity of modern electronics from CPUs up are a testament to this.

I think his advice is good, but it was much better long ago. Granted all it takes is a war or depression to change all that.

Finally, wouldn't HG Wells have been considered both respectable and a sci-fi writer?


I hadn't even considered the Depression, gah. Of course, that makes a lot of sense. Thanks.

As for Wells, I'm not sure about this, but I don't believe that what we now call 'science fiction' (in any sense) was a recognised form or genre in his day. He described his own works as "scientific romances," but I think such 'speculative fiction' of his day was not considered in the same light as the later pulp genre of 'science fiction,' but more the thoughtful musings of Edwardian scholars.
 
2012-07-01 05:17:15 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Uchiha_Cycliste: I would wager ,more so than anything else, Heinlein's views were shaped by the age he lived in. He was 7 when WWI broke out. Technology as we know it today was only a fantasy. In such a time specialization likely meant both buttonholing yourself and not being very (if at all) productive within the scope of helping your country or fellow man. As he grew e would have seen many places where people were needed for many reasons and likely would have seen the distinct advantage of having numerous skills. Especially during the great depression and WWII.
Heinlein could not possibly have groked what the later decades of the twentieth century would hold in store for us. Consequently, he would urge others to be able to take care of themselves no matter what happened.

If you can imagine a global depression or a global war standing at our finger tips, it really helps to understand what he was thinking. These were periods of unspeakable crisis. Uncertainty and suffering that threatened not people, not neighborhoods, but the whole country. It only made sense to want and need to be able to assist your fellowman in every way possible.

I think the relative stability of the last 50 years, along with the enormous advantage we had at the end of WWII, with our industrial and manufacturing capacity not being destroyed by the war, specialization is both more reasonable and in many cases necessary these days. The mind-boggling complexity of modern electronics from CPUs up are a testament to this.

I think his advice is good, but it was much better long ago. Granted all it takes is a war or depression to change all that.

Finally, wouldn't HG Wells have been considered both respectable and a sci-fi writer?

I hadn't even considered the Depression, gah. Of course, that makes a lot of sense. Thanks.

As for Wells, I'm not sure about this, but I don't believe that what we now call 'science fiction' (in any sense) was a recognised form or genre in his day. He described his own ...


I think that even if the genre had yet to be created/coined, Well's work easily falls under the Sci-fi blanket. Though I suppose that doesn't matter too much as he wrote a hundred years ago.

I also think we've come a long way towards understanding where Heinlein's aversion to specialization came from, though I would still argue that his views are not as appreciable in this modern world we live in.
 
2012-07-02 12:55:22 AM  
tl; dr ^^^
 
2012-07-02 03:14:02 PM  
It would have taken a lot less than 11 months if he didn't take so many pictures and used a video camera setting instead. :P
 
2012-07-02 06:10:09 PM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: Heinlein could not possibly have groked what the later decades of the twentieth century would hold in store for us.


Excellent usage. So incredibly appropriate to use it where you did, an homage even.
 
2012-07-03 10:07:37 PM  
I love straight sixes. They are so easy to work on, since you have so much extra room on the sides.

Yes, I know that this is a straight four from an MG, but the principle still apples to this, I bet.
 
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