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(Guardian)   What is the Higgs boson? And more importantly, is it bountiful?   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 25
    More: Interesting, higgs particles  
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2919 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Jun 2012 at 10:38 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-30 10:58:31 AM
Lonely in here.
 
2012-06-30 11:03:37 AM

italie: Lonely in here.


Well, at least Pete and his twin brother are here.
 
2012-06-30 11:10:53 AM
FTFA: Engineers threw the switch to start up the LHC in September 2008 to global fanfare. All went well until it had to be shut down again 36 hours later.

Was it really shut down 36 hours later? Or is that just what I want you all to think?

/steeples fingers, leans back in chair smugly
 
2012-06-30 11:33:48 AM

jso2897: Pete and his twin brother are here


RePete?
 
2012-06-30 11:48:11 AM
Well to be fair, the 1st article talked about the higgs boson but didnt give the neat explaination that this one gives. Even if said explaination is so dumb down to be explained and understood to a chimp in Amy's lab. It might be useful for Penny.
 
2012-06-30 11:56:32 AM
Yay! Peter Higgs was born a few hundred yards from where I type this.

This reflects favourably upon me.
 
2012-06-30 12:03:23 PM
One thing I've never seen explained in any of these articles, no matter how dumbed down they are: Is this a particle that is thought to be in all matter, the way electrons, quarks, etc. are? Is it everywhere, we just haven't yet figured out how to detect it? Or is it a kind of particle that only exists under certain conditions? Every article on the LHC explains that it hopes to "replicate the conditions that haven't been seen since the big bang, but I don't know if the Higgs exists ONLY under those conditions, or it's only believed that under those conditions can it be observed.
 
2012-06-30 12:11:43 PM

MonkeyAngst: One thing I've never seen explained in any of these articles, no matter how dumbed down they are: Is this a particle that is thought to be in all matter, the way electrons, quarks, etc. are? Is it everywhere, we just haven't yet figured out how to detect it? Or is it a kind of particle that only exists under certain conditions? Every article on the LHC explains that it hopes to "replicate the conditions that haven't been seen since the big bang, but I don't know if the Higgs exists ONLY under those conditions, or it's only believed that under those conditions can it be observed.


The Higga boson isn't in anything, and it doesn't create mass. But for mass to exist under the Standard Model, the Higgs boson has to exist. Think of it like this: for a baby to exist, there must have existed a placenta; the LHC is trying to rebuild a hospital and recreate the exact conditions of your birth, so they can then dig through the medical waste landfill to find your placenta. Finding it proves the way we understand mammalian reproduction is correct
 
2012-06-30 12:20:05 PM
FTFA: According to Higgs, it wasn't even Lederman's choice to call it the god particle: "He wanted to refer to it as that 'goddamn particle' and his editor wouldn't let him."

HA!
 
2012-06-30 12:24:24 PM

MonkeyAngst: One thing I've never seen explained in any of these articles, no matter how dumbed down they are: Is this a particle that is thought to be in all matter, the way electrons, quarks, etc. are? Is it everywhere, we just haven't yet figured out how to detect it? Or is it a kind of particle that only exists under certain conditions? Every article on the LHC explains that it hopes to , but I don't know if the Higgs exists ONLY under those conditions, or it's only believed that under those conditions can it be observed.


I'll take a shot here and hope somebody smarter shows up to say how I'm wrong. All "fields" can also be seen as an exchange of particles. So if there's a Higgs field, there must be Higgs particles that represent the action of the field. Since this field is everywhere, the particles must be everywhere but unless they influence particles we can observe, like electrons or double-pi-mu-besons that decay into electrons or whatever the hell (I can't keep track of the goddamn particles) then we can't "see" them.

The LHC hopes to "replicate the conditions that haven't been seen since the big bang" where we can SEE the effects happen-- these conditions exist all the time throughout the universe when various high-energy particles happen to slam into one another, but our nice convenient particle detectors aren't in the exact solar-system location where two random high-energy stripped nuclei will happen to smash into each other next week -- even though they'll smash together with thousands of times more energy than the LHC can apply.
 
2012-06-30 12:40:29 PM

phalamir: MonkeyAngst: One thing I've never seen explained in any of these articles, no matter how dumbed down they are: Is this a particle that is thought to be in all matter, the way electrons, quarks, etc. are? Is it everywhere, we just haven't yet figured out how to detect it? Or is it a kind of particle that only exists under certain conditions? Every article on the LHC explains that it hopes to "replicate the conditions that haven't been seen since the big bang, but I don't know if the Higgs exists ONLY under those conditions, or it's only believed that under those conditions can it be observed.

The Higga boson isn't in anything, and it doesn't create mass. But for mass to exist under the Standard Model, the Higgs boson has to exist. Think of it like this: for a baby to exist, there must have existed a placenta; the LHC is trying to rebuild a hospital and recreate the exact conditions of your birth, so they can then dig through the medical waste landfill to find your placenta. Finding it proves the way we understand mammalian reproduction is correct



The is the most beautifully repugnant analogy I have ever heard.
 
2012-06-30 12:41:29 PM

phalamir: Higga


I lol'd
 
2012-06-30 12:47:01 PM
www.treaclechops.co.za
 
2012-06-30 12:54:01 PM

MonkeyAngst: Is it everywhere, we just haven't yet figured out how to detect it? Or is it a kind of particle that only exists under certain conditions?


It only exists as a real particle under certain conditions, but one of the fun things in physics is that particles don't have to exist in order to do stuff. For example, tritium is a radioactive isotope that decays when one of its neutrons emits a W- particle and turns into a proton. That W- particle in turn splits into an electron and an electron antineutrino.

The mass of a W- particle is about 80 GeV/c2 but the mass of a whole tritium atom is less than 3 GeV/c2, so conservation of mass says that you can't have a real W- there. Instead it exists as what's called a "virtual particle", appearing and disappearing quickly enough that it can evade the conservation law. To actually "see" a W- you need to whack some stuff together hard enough to provide at least 80 GeV of energy. It would be a similar scenario with the Higgs, but the energy required to flip it from virtual to real is even higher.

p.s. according to my sources on the Internet the Higgs mass is equal to 1/2 the sum of the masses of the W+, W-, and Z0 bosons, which is around 126 GeV/c2.
 
2012-06-30 01:11:05 PM

Ivo Shandor: p.s. according to my sources on the Internet the Higgs mass is equal to 1/2 the sum of the masses of the W+, W-, and Z0 bosons, which is around 126 GeV/c2.


That's a big Twinkie...
 
2012-06-30 01:17:24 PM

italie: jso2897: Pete and his twin brother are here

RePete?


Pete and his twin brother are here
 
2012-06-30 01:45:22 PM

Yotto: italie: jso2897: Pete and his twin brother are here

RePete?

Pete and his twin brother are here


RePete?
 
2012-06-30 01:51:26 PM
 
2012-06-30 01:59:26 PM
mmmm BBQ Bison
 
2012-06-30 03:19:28 PM
Glad I'm not the only one who CONSISTENTLY misreads that word.
 
2012-06-30 03:29:00 PM
I don't see what the big deal is.

i105.photobucket.com
The Higgs bosom doesn't look all that impressive to me.
 
2012-07-01 12:39:11 AM
The Earth was destroyed when scientists discovered the Higgs Boson.

This has happened before and it will happen again.

/yo-ay-oh
 
2012-07-01 02:54:33 AM
dl.dropbox.com
SERN?
 
2012-07-01 11:52:45 AM
This may seem a stupid question, but can only things with mass have charge or is there such a thing as a massless charged particle?
 
2012-07-01 02:04:51 PM
More like the large hardon collider:

images.askmen.com

Am I doing it right?
 
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