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(LA Times)   Recalling his epic battle against government waste in the form of "something called volcano monitoring", Gov Jindal takes aim at another area of useless government bloat, and eliminates all funding for libraries in his state   (latimesblogs.latimes.com) divider line 241
    More: Sad, prediction of volcanic activity, computer skills, public libraries, library, mass transit, Bobby Jindal, refuses  
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4159 clicks; posted to Politics » on 29 Jun 2012 at 4:53 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-29 04:54:46 PM
Well, it's Louisiana. They don't read down there anyway.
 
2012-06-29 04:56:32 PM
Who needs books when you're covered in magma?
 
2012-06-29 04:56:48 PM

Lando Lincoln: They don't read down there anyway.


ture, yet many, many LA residents will be disappointed - the books made up half of their diet.
 
2012-06-29 04:57:19 PM
Speaking of Jindal and waste ...

wonkroom.thinkprogress.org
 
2012-06-29 04:57:55 PM
Who needs books? I get all the information and entertainment I need from Fox News, Conservapedia and my local Church.
 
2012-06-29 04:58:05 PM
In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

"Specifically, tax breaks to pharmaceutical companies and vouchers for Christian-based schools".

Oh crap, they're already doing one of those, damn, ruins the joke.
 
2012-06-29 04:59:19 PM
fark you jindal
 
2012-06-29 04:59:42 PM
t2.gstatic.com

Where would this book be in the Derpy decimal system?
 
2012-06-29 04:59:43 PM

vernonFL: Who needs books? I get all the information and entertainment I need from Fox News, Conservapedia and my local Church.


Don't forget Fark. I use this and the Google news as well as books.
 
2012-06-29 05:00:15 PM
I don't know about the rest of you, but I sure wouldn't want to go down in history as "The Man that Killed Libraries".



/Or as an exorcist
//Just sayin'...
 
2012-06-29 05:00:39 PM
... Are you farking kidding me?

I await the slow leech of any and all business that expect to hire halfway intelligent people from Louisiana.

Which is a shame, New Orleans is a damned fine town.
 
2012-06-29 05:00:58 PM
Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*
 
2012-06-29 05:01:45 PM
F*ck you, Bobby!
 
2012-06-29 05:01:58 PM
upload.wikimedia.org

"The only people who need the library are poor people so...you know...no-brainer, really."
 
2012-06-29 05:03:09 PM
We make satirical pictures overstating and mocking conservatives, and then they go and make them law. Irony is so abused.

zoomstreet.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-06-29 05:03:25 PM

DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*


They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.
 
2012-06-29 05:04:09 PM
That'll learn 'em.
 
2012-06-29 05:04:59 PM
Oh God
 
2012-06-29 05:05:12 PM
Well, he didn't want to join the ever-growing line of people who have publicly declared, "Oh hell no, I'm not going to be Rmoney's VP pick."

So he's being a little more subtle and poisoning the well so they won't pick him without having to make a public refusal.
 
2012-06-29 05:05:32 PM

Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.


I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.
 
2012-06-29 05:07:10 PM

Skywolf Philosopher: Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.


I am not surprised. Most people on FARK when they talk about libraries seem like they haven't stepped inside one for the last 20 years.
 
2012-06-29 05:08:24 PM

Corvus: Most people on FARK when they talk about libraries seem like they haven't stepped inside one for the last 20 years.


the video rental place has a better porn section.
 
2012-06-29 05:10:05 PM
It's not the burning of the Library of Alexandria -but you can see it from there.
 
2012-06-29 05:11:17 PM
"In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education. " So they prioritized spending on education by eliminating libraries.
 
2012-06-29 05:11:30 PM
To be honest, the last time I actually checked a book out of a library was in college.

The only time after that I was even in a library was for for a conference on something at the local University and they had a coffee shop in the library and I got a coffee.
 
2012-06-29 05:12:36 PM

propasaurus: So they prioritized spending on education by eliminating libraries.


Football team aren't cheap ya know.
 
2012-06-29 05:12:39 PM

Lurk sober post drunk: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x271]

"The only people who need the library are poor people so...you know...no-brainer, really."


bah, homeless people can bathe at Starbucks
 
2012-06-29 05:13:10 PM

vernonFL: To be honest, the last time I actually checked a book out of a library was in college.

The only time after that I was even in a library was for for a conference on something at the local University and they had a coffee shop in the library and I got a coffee.


The only times I went to the library in college were for a girl or to utilize the library's copy of an absurdly expensive textbook.
 
2012-06-29 05:13:17 PM
FTFA: In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Libraries are a part of education. What sort of idiots voted for this retard?
 
2012-06-29 05:15:30 PM

qorkfiend: vernonFL: To be honest, the last time I actually checked a book out of a library was in college.

The only time after that I was even in a library was for for a conference on something at the local University and they had a coffee shop in the library and I got a coffee.

The only times I went to the library in college were for a girl or to utilize the library's copy of an absurdly expensive textbook.


you could check girls out of your college library? That's farking awesome. They must've been pretty dogeared though, huh?
 
2012-06-29 05:15:40 PM
can't spell library without lib
 
2012-06-29 05:16:58 PM
One more instance of a red state bragging about austerity and failing to keep the doors open on a pivotal institution.

Don't worry, Louisiana, I'm sure Gov. Jindal will be howling about states rights again while telling his treasurer to go ahead and endorse another check from the federal government soon enough.
 
Ehh
2012-06-29 05:17:00 PM
So when an ultra-rich job creator gave away a fortune to build libraries across America, he was in fact under the influence of a snot-dripping libtard demon?

/an invisible demon
 
2012-06-29 05:17:11 PM

skullkrusher: Lurk sober post drunk: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x271]

"The only people who need the library are poor people so...you know...no-brainer, really."

bah, homeless people can bathe at Starbucks


They don't call it bathing there, they call it "Washenti" instead. Bathing is for the rest of those normal places.
 
2012-06-29 05:17:53 PM

skullkrusher: qorkfiend: vernonFL: To be honest, the last time I actually checked a book out of a library was in college.

The only time after that I was even in a library was for for a conference on something at the local University and they had a coffee shop in the library and I got a coffee.

The only times I went to the library in college were for a girl or to utilize the library's copy of an absurdly expensive textbook.

you could check girls out of your college library? That's farking awesome. They must've been pretty dogeared though, huh?


It was the computer science library. They weren't that bad, but they were all in a different language.
 
2012-06-29 05:18:05 PM

Epoch_Zero: skullkrusher: Lurk sober post drunk: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x271]

"The only people who need the library are poor people so...you know...no-brainer, really."

bah, homeless people can bathe at Starbucks

They don't call it bathing there, they call it "Washenti" instead. Bathing is for the rest of those normal places.


farking baristas
 
2012-06-29 05:18:14 PM

rebelyell2006: What sort of idiots voted for this retard?


Forget it, Jake. It's Louisiana.
 
2012-06-29 05:18:43 PM
Our college library had a guy who everyone called 'the mystery masturbator', and he was never identified or caught.

Several students saw him jacking it in the library on numerous occasions.
 
2012-06-29 05:19:11 PM

qorkfiend: skullkrusher: qorkfiend: vernonFL: To be honest, the last time I actually checked a book out of a library was in college.

The only time after that I was even in a library was for for a conference on something at the local University and they had a coffee shop in the library and I got a coffee.

The only times I went to the library in college were for a girl or to utilize the library's copy of an absurdly expensive textbook.

you could check girls out of your college library? That's farking awesome. They must've been pretty dogeared though, huh?

It was the computer science library. They weren't that bad, but they were all in a different language.


I'd like one redhead to fiddle my bits, please
 
2012-06-29 05:19:43 PM

DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*


From TFA:

Concordia formerly got $12,000 per year from the state, which it used to "keep up all of the maintenance [on its 52 PCs], buy new software, and to buy new equipment as needed."

The funding Jindal eliminated was used to finance the upkeep on your fine "high-tech computer center" idea.
 
2012-06-29 05:19:51 PM

skullkrusher: qorkfiend: skullkrusher: qorkfiend: vernonFL: To be honest, the last time I actually checked a book out of a library was in college.

The only time after that I was even in a library was for for a conference on something at the local University and they had a coffee shop in the library and I got a coffee.

The only times I went to the library in college were for a girl or to utilize the library's copy of an absurdly expensive textbook.

you could check girls out of your college library? That's farking awesome. They must've been pretty dogeared though, huh?

It was the computer science library. They weren't that bad, but they were all in a different language.

I'd like one redhead to fiddle my bits, please


Sorry, all reserved.
 
2012-06-29 05:20:06 PM

qorkfiend: vernonFL: To be honest, the last time I actually checked a book out of a library was in college.

The only time after that I was even in a library was for for a conference on something at the local University and they had a coffee shop in the library and I got a coffee.

The only times I went to the library in college were for a girl or to utilize the library's copy of an absurdly expensive textbook.


My library also has magazines, newspapers, music, dvds, and a book sale room. And I'm a book nerd, so I actually check out books with this thing called a library card.
 
2012-06-29 05:20:13 PM
Romney PLEASE pick Jindal for VP!!!

PLEASE!

The thing about Romney is he is someone who likes yes men and won't pick someone who would show him up. So we will get some B lister if not C lister.
 
2012-06-29 05:20:21 PM

vernonFL: Our college library had a guy who everyone called 'the mystery masturbator', and he was never identified or caught.

Several students saw him jacking it in the library on numerous occasions.


My college library had private reading booths, just large enough for two people if you were thin enough and flexible.
 
2012-06-29 05:20:45 PM

Loucifer: Who needs books when you're covered in magma?


I can't read that word without hearing it in Dr. Evil's voice.
 
2012-06-29 05:22:17 PM

vernonFL: Our college library had a guy who everyone called 'the mystery masturbator', and he was never identified or caught.

Several students saw him jacking it in the library on numerous occasions.


What can I say, i love to read.
 
2012-06-29 05:22:53 PM

qorkfiend: skullkrusher: qorkfiend: skullkrusher: qorkfiend: vernonFL: To be honest, the last time I actually checked a book out of a library was in college.

The only time after that I was even in a library was for for a conference on something at the local University and they had a coffee shop in the library and I got a coffee.

The only times I went to the library in college were for a girl or to utilize the library's copy of an absurdly expensive textbook.

you could check girls out of your college library? That's farking awesome. They must've been pretty dogeared though, huh?

It was the computer science library. They weren't that bad, but they were all in a different language.

I'd like one redhead to fiddle my bits, please

Sorry, all reserved.


oh, I forget to specify that she better be little-endian. Last time you gave me a big-endian and I was afraid to run her on my laptop lest she crash my pipe
 
2012-06-29 05:22:58 PM

Skywolf Philosopher: qorkfiend: vernonFL: To be honest, the last time I actually checked a book out of a library was in college.

The only time after that I was even in a library was for for a conference on something at the local University and they had a coffee shop in the library and I got a coffee.

The only times I went to the library in college were for a girl or to utilize the library's copy of an absurdly expensive textbook.

My library also has magazines, newspapers, music, dvds, and a book sale room. And I'm a book nerd, so I actually check out books with this thing called a library card.


A library what? They make you carry some sort of card? That sounds an awful lot like communism.
 
2012-06-29 05:22:59 PM

qorkfiend: The only times I went to the library in college were for a girl or to utilize the library's copy of an absurdly expensive textbook.


Stay away from grad school and research jobs, then. "No electronic copy of this article exists" is still a phrase that causes me to flinch compulsively whenever i see or hear it.

That and every time I look up something in the card catalog and then head to the actual stacks to find it I subconsciously expect that the only part that's in english is the title and the rest of the text is in 1970s technical Russian.

//DAMN YOU SCIFINDER.
 
2012-06-29 05:23:14 PM
izit.org
 
2012-06-29 05:23:14 PM
I don't go to the library either but all the stay at home moms I know of use it a lot, taking their young children there for all the little events they have during the week. I think libraries are for the very old and the very young...like diapers...
 
2012-06-29 05:23:16 PM

verbaltoxin: My college library had private reading booths, just large enough for two people if you were thin enough and flexible.


I loved being a music major, just put a piece of paper over the practice room window and roll the piano in front of the door.
 
2012-06-29 05:23:18 PM
I don't go to the library either but all the stay at home moms I know of use it a lot, taking their young children there for all the little events they have during the week. I think libraries are for the very old and the very young...
 
2012-06-29 05:23:21 PM

vernonFL: Our college library had a guy who everyone called 'the mystery masturbator', and he was never identified or caught.

Several students saw him jacking it in the library on numerous occasions.


We had a guy that would finish in random books. I never saw it happen, but I did see the evidence. Sick. A very "bro" prank. Probably a frat.
 
2012-06-29 05:23:28 PM
That dude has the most punchable face I have ever seen.

/and yes I would happily punch it....several times
 
2012-06-29 05:24:13 PM

rebelyell2006: FTFA: In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Libraries are a part of education. What sort of idiots voted for this retard?


Helpful image of what Jindal's constituency looks like:

images.tvrage.com
 
2012-06-29 05:25:50 PM
If only there was a network of computers spanning the planet containing the world's knowledge, maybe with a free Encyclopedia that could be edited by anyone, the people of Louisiana might be saved. If only ...
 
2012-06-29 05:28:48 PM

beta_plus: If only there was a network of computers spanning the planet containing the world's knowledge, maybe with a free Encyclopedia that could be edited by anyone, the people of Louisiana might be saved. If only ...


Who needs books when you have wikipedia? Is that what you're going with?
 
2012-06-29 05:28:58 PM

beta_plus: free Encyclopedia that could be edited by anyone


They could learn all about Willard shiat Romney.

p.twimg.com
 
2012-06-29 05:29:38 PM
I'm a Texan living in Louisiana. And a retired career librarian. The ironic thing about this is, Louisiana conservatives like to brag on the fact that Jindal was a Rhodes Scholar. Wouldn't Cecil Rhodes be proud?
 
2012-06-29 05:29:39 PM

DeltaPunch: We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc.


You'd be surprised how much those 'online books, teaching tools, databases, and more' actually cost.
 
2012-06-29 05:31:01 PM

you are a puppet: beta_plus: If only there was a network of computers spanning the planet containing the world's knowledge, maybe with a free Encyclopedia that could be edited by anyone, the people of Louisiana might be saved. If only ...

Who needs books when you have wikipedia? Is that what you're going with?


hehe. Seriously though, how often do you go to the library and for what?
 
2012-06-29 05:32:48 PM

St_Francis_P: [izit.org image 550x550]


Mine got deleted. But someone posting that in another thread didn't.
 
2012-06-29 05:34:06 PM
It's clear many in this thread DRTFA.

/classic liberal blunder, get all the info you need from the title and project from there.
 
2012-06-29 05:35:20 PM

skipjack: It's clear many in this thread DRTFA.

/classic liberal blunder, get all the info you need from the title and project from there.


It said he was cutting state funding and many municipalities won't have enough money to cover it and they will need to close.

What did we miss exactly?
 
2012-06-29 05:35:49 PM

skipjack: It's clear many in this thread DRTFA.

/classic liberal blunder, get all the info you need from the title and project from there.


FTFA: Citing budget concerns, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal has signed a $25-billion budget that eliminates almost $900,000 in state funding for its libraries.

Nice try, troll.
 
2012-06-29 05:36:21 PM

Corvus: St_Francis_P: [izit.org image 550x550]

Mine got deleted. But someone posting that in another thread didn't.


That's because mine is a patriotic, American eagle. Yours was probably some foreign bird.
 
2012-06-29 05:37:00 PM
:(

Benjamin Franklin is undoubtedly spinning in his grave right now.
 
2012-06-29 05:38:23 PM

skullkrusher: you are a puppet: beta_plus: If only there was a network of computers spanning the planet containing the world's knowledge, maybe with a free Encyclopedia that could be edited by anyone, the people of Louisiana might be saved. If only ...

Who needs books when you have wikipedia? Is that what you're going with?

hehe. Seriously though, how often do you go to the library and for what?


i use it for ghettotorrent utility. local library has a decent older music selection, as well as a whole pile of audiobooks. check them out, rip them, keep the files for whenever i get around to it.

vast majority of what i'm after is available just by clicking, but some stuff is better stolen from an actual medium still. besides, it gives me a chance to visit Rowdy, Patches, and Shy Pete.
 
2012-06-29 05:38:36 PM
Libraries are typically funded at the local level, hence why you are only allowed to get a library card if you live in the service area.

I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."
 
2012-06-29 05:39:20 PM

Lorelle: :(

Benjamin Franklin is undoubtedly spinning in his grave right now.


he's probably saying Lousiawhat?
 
2012-06-29 05:42:14 PM

rebelyell2006: FTFA: In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Libraries are a part of education. What sort of idiots voted for this retard?


No, libraries were a part of education, in a bygone era. We have a brand new library in my suburb, gorgeous architecture. When you drive by, it is a really interesting and pretty building. I don't think I have ever seen more than two cars in the parking lot at any given time.
 
2012-06-29 05:44:09 PM
I don't know a single person in the immediate area who actually likes this

farking Jindal
 
2012-06-29 05:44:15 PM

mksmith: I'm a Texan living in Louisiana. And a retired career librarian. The ironic thing about this is, Louisiana conservatives like to brag on the fact that Jindal was a Rhodes Scholar. Wouldn't Cecil Rhodes be proud?


Cecil Rhodes would be all like "Indians? In my scholarship? Nope. No Way."

Mr. Piyush seems to be quote the asshole. Where's his birth certificate?
 
2012-06-29 05:44:59 PM

pxsteel: No, libraries were a part of education, in a bygone era. We have a brand new library in my suburb, gorgeous architecture. When you drive by, it is a really interesting and pretty building. I don't think I have ever seen more than two cars in the parking lot at any given time.


The one in my neighborhood is filled all the time. Also that doesn't count the downloadable ebooks they have on their website.
 
2012-06-29 05:46:03 PM

skullkrusher: you are a puppet: beta_plus: If only there was a network of computers spanning the planet containing the world's knowledge, maybe with a free Encyclopedia that could be edited by anyone, the people of Louisiana might be saved. If only ...

Who needs books when you have wikipedia? Is that what you're going with?

hehe. Seriously though, how often do you go to the library and for what?


I go for books that I want to read since I pay for some small portion of them. Then again I read for pleasure and entertainment. Hell, in my library system I have ebooks, audio books (including mp3), videos and music. I have seen some systems that do video games. The main branch have research librarians who will give you selections for specific subjects, given certain criteria that may require more knowledge than google can provide. Not to mention access to scholarly articles where I have actually gone to where I could not find a free online resource for. I go anywhere from once a month to maybe four times. Not to mention the occasional kid oriented events they do. Libraries do so much more for a community than give you access to books that it isn't funny.
 
2012-06-29 05:48:36 PM

Shaggy_C: I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."


When responding to republican ideas might as well stick to the the level of discourse that they created.
 
2012-06-29 05:49:35 PM

lockers: I go for books that I want to read since I pay for some small portion of them. Then again I read for pleasure and entertainment. Hell, in my library system I have ebooks, audio books (including mp3), videos and music. I have seen some systems that do video games. The main branch have research librarians who will give you selections for specific subjects, given certain criteria that may require more knowledge than google can provide. Not to mention access to scholarly articles where I have actually gone to where I could not find a free online resource for. I go anywhere from once a month to maybe four times. Not to mention the occasional kid oriented events they do. Libraries do so much more for a community than give you access to books that it isn't funny.


Almost ll libraries do that now. These "experts" who are going "hurrr hurr books are outdated we should get rid of libraries" are idiots who don't know what they are talking about. Surprise, surprise.

I know a librarian and she would tell me how swamped they were for computer usage. They had to run really stick limits for computer access because it would go all day with many people in line waiting.
 
2012-06-29 05:50:45 PM

Headso: Shaggy_C: I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."

When responding to republican ideas might as well stick to the the level of discourse that they created.


Was it Herman Cain or President McBain that said "We want a leader, not a reader"?

I get them confused as they are both hilarious cartoons.
 
2012-06-29 05:51:13 PM

Shaggy_C: I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."


Yea the would NEVER say something that dumb:

"I think the intent is that the Republican Party is opposed to the values clarification method that serves the purpose of challenging students beliefs and undermine parental authority," he said.

Oh wait they have! They put it in their platform.
 
2012-06-29 05:51:26 PM
When did Fez from That 70's show get to be governor of Louisiana?

nick.mtvnimages.com
 
2012-06-29 05:51:33 PM

Muta: Speaking of Jindal and waste ...

[wonkroom.thinkprogress.org image 512x384]


Indeed. If Louisiana has no libraries, what will Jindal throw into the ocean the next time the coast is threatened?
 
2012-06-29 05:52:33 PM

Epoch_Zero: Was it Herman Cain or President McBain that said "We want a leader, not a reader"?


I am curious regarding Cain's opinion on pitchers versus belly itchers...
 
2012-06-29 05:52:58 PM

Epoch_Zero: Headso: Shaggy_C: I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."

When responding to republican ideas might as well stick to the the level of discourse that they created.

Was it Herman Cain or President McBain that said "We want a leader, not a reader"?

I get them confused as they are both hilarious cartoons.


Governor Perry is also funny. I love his big white cowboy hat and his guns when he chases after Bugs Bunny... Oh wait I might have that confused.
 
2012-06-29 05:53:50 PM
Stanford Ushers In The Age Of Bookless Libraries
by LAURA SYDELL

Listen to the Story
Morning Edition
transcript
 

EnlargeJustin Sullivan/Getty Images
In 2004, Stanford University became one of the first institutions to allow Google to digitize chunks of its library collection as part of the Google Books Library Project.

July 8, 2010
The periodical shelves at Stanford University's Engineering Library are nearly bare. Library chief Helen Josephine says that in the past five years, most engineering periodicals have been moved online, making their print versions pretty obsolete - and books aren't doing much better.

According to Josephine, students can now browse those periodicals from their laptops or mobile devices.

For years, students have had to search through volume after volume of books before finding the right formula - but no more. Josephine says that "with books being digitized and available through full text search capabilities, they can find that formula quite easily."

In 2005, when the university realized it was running out space for its growing collection of 80,000 engineering books, administrators decided to build a new library. But instead of creating more space for books, they chose to create less.

The new library is set to open in August with 10,000 engineering books on the shelves - a decrease of more than 85 percent from the old library. Stanford library director Michael Keller says the librarians determined which books to keep on the shelf by looking at how frequently a book was checked out. They found that the vast majority of the collection hadn't been taken off the shelf in five years.

Keller expects that, eventually, there won't be any books on the shelves at all.

"As the world turns more and more, the items that appeared in physical form in previous decades and centuries are appearing in digital form," he says.

Given the nature of engineering, that actually comes in handy. Engineering uses some basic formulas but is generally a rapidly changing field - particularly in specialties such as software and bioengineering. Traditional textbooks have rarely been able to keep up.

Jim Plummer, dean of Stanford's School of Engineering, says that's why his faculty is increasingly using e-books.

"It allows our faculty to change examples," he says," to put in new homework problems ... and lectures and things like that in almost a real-time way."

A New Trend In Libraries?

For the moment, the Engineering Library is the only Stanford library that's cutting back on books. But Keller says he can see what's coming down the road by simply looking at the current crop of Stanford students.

"They write their papers online, and they read articles online, and many, many, many of them read chapters and books online," he says. "I can see in this population of students behaviors that clearly indicate where this is all going."

And while it's still rare among American libraries to get rid of such a large amount of books, it's clear that many are starting to lay the groundwork for a different future. According to a survey by the Association of Research Libraries, American libraries are spending more of their money on electronic resources and less on books.

Cornell University's Engineering Library recently announced an initiative similar to Stanford's - but the move to electronic books is also meeting some resistance. An effort by Arizona State University to use Amazon's Kindle to distribute electronic textbooks was met with a lawsuit because the device wasn't fully accessible to the visually impaired.

Meanwhile, back at Stanford's new Engineering Library, librarians are looking forward to spending less time with books and more time with people.

"That's what we're so [excited about]," Josephine says, "the idea of actually offering more services, offering more workshops, offering more one-on-one time with students."

But some Stanford students express mixed feelings about the shift. Engineering student Sam Tsai is checking out some old-fashioned paper books.

"To read a book on the screen is kind of tiring for me," Tsai says, "so I sometimes like [the] paper form. But if I can access books online, it's much more convenient for me, so I would actually prefer that as well."

For now, at least, Tsai can have the option of both.
 
2012-06-29 05:54:14 PM

DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*


It's not just you, that's actually the rationale for shutting down libraries in many places--and the REASON for doing so, since so many people aren't going to libraries any more.

That doesn't mean that in Louisiana it's not ALSO being done because of failed conservative policies.
 
2012-06-29 05:54:35 PM
This entire thread is beautiful *wipes tear*
 
2012-06-29 05:54:36 PM
I've decided I may turn to the dark side. I mean, if this country is going to go down the shiatter, I might as well make a buck off the tools that are doing it.

Here is my master plan:

Step 1) Join a church. Pay huge donations to be listed as a member but never actually go.

Step 2) Sell "I Love God/Jesus" & "Obama is a Commie/Socialist" & "2nd Amendment protected" tshirts, pins and stickers.

Step 3) With my money, run as a Republican in a Midwestern or Southern State

Step 4) Once elected sell off Local/State assets to the highest bidder

Step 5) Enjoy every sin imaginable under the guise of being for "family values"


Ta da!

i234.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-29 05:54:48 PM

Shaggy_C: Libraries are typically funded at the local level, hence why you are only allowed to get a library card if you live in the service area.

I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."


Yes, they are. But many receive some monies from state level funding. I've worked in a Public Library system, asshole. This will hurt in certain sectors and many libraries will have to cancel certain programs. The GOP is a bunch of retards. BTW, where's Piyush's Birth Certificate? He's full Indian and that's NOT AMERICAN !
 
2012-06-29 05:56:48 PM
See Jindal don't need none of that book lernin' like them stoopid scientist who told him not ta build his land berm. He lets his gut do the thinkin'!!

wonkroom.thinkprogress.org
 
2012-06-29 05:57:07 PM

Corvus: Skywolf Philosopher: Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.

I am not surprised. Most people on FARK when they talk about libraries seem like they haven't stepped inside one for the last 20 years.


I go to the library every other week. They have computer terminals, and other computers for looking up books. They definitely don't have kindles and other things, but it's not big (size of a city apt building, only the ground floor). And you can get books from the library system delivered to that branch in about 1 day. It's always full of people.

I'm wondering if size has anything to do with it. I haven't been to a gimongous library in ages, but I'm wondering if these smaller city branches are more affordable to operate...
 
2012-06-29 06:01:26 PM

Corvus: pxsteel: No, libraries were a part of education, in a bygone era. We have a brand new library in my suburb, gorgeous architecture. When you drive by, it is a really interesting and pretty building. I don't think I have ever seen more than two cars in the parking lot at any given time.

The one in my neighborhood is filled all the time. Also that doesn't count the downloadable ebooks they have on their website.



My local library is always packed too. And the Seattle library has a HUGE amount of tech books online. It's really great when you're trying to learn something.
 
2012-06-29 06:01:53 PM

DeltaPunch: Corvus: Skywolf Philosopher: Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.

I am not surprised. Most people on FARK when they talk about libraries seem like they haven't stepped inside one for the last 20 years.

I go to the library every other week. They have computer terminals, and other computers for looking up books. They definitely don't have kindles and other things, but it's not big (size of a city apt building, only the ground floor). And you can get books from the library system delivered to that branch in about 1 day. It's always full of people.

I'm wondering if size has anything to do with it. I haven't been to a gimongous library in ages, but I'm wondering if these smaller city branches are more affordable to operate...


Wow your library sounds not the great. All the libraries I have seen in California and Nevada are all real modern. In fact many probably only have 30% of it is books. Much of it is computers and media. In my city it has ebook and videos you can download online. And no this is not the even the main library it's a branch.

Also one library by me shows movies too and also has large meeting rooms with white boards for people.

Most libraries I now of are much more like you were describing.
 
2012-06-29 06:04:03 PM

Corvus: They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.


*clicks profile*

Yup, thought so...sweet home California. Not only does my local library have lots of computers and bound AND e-books, but it's tied into the neighboring counties' libraries, as well, AND above that search level, all the public (inc. universities) libraries in NorCal.

Need a book from Berkeley? *Click* Delivered to my local branch in 2-3 business days.
 
2012-06-29 06:06:26 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com

"buh?"
 
2012-06-29 06:07:01 PM
Hey Bobby maybe you shouldn't have wasted 220 MILLION dollars on a sand berm that didn't do shiat.


The presidential commission investigating the BP Gulf of Mexico spill has concluded that Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal wasted $220 million building controversial sand berms that captured a "minuscule amount" of oil and proved to be "underwhelmingly effective" and "overwhelmingly expensive."
 
2012-06-29 06:08:58 PM

StoneColdAtheist: Corvus: They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

*clicks profile*

Yup, thought so...sweet home California. Not only does my local library have lots of computers and bound AND e-books, but it's tied into the neighboring counties' libraries, as well, AND above that search level, all the public (inc. universities) libraries in NorCal.

Need a book from Berkeley? *Click* Delivered to my local branch in 2-3 business days.


Even Nevada which they don't like to spend shiat on public stuff has pretty modernized libraries. I think CA's are much better but theirs are ok.
 
2012-06-29 06:11:17 PM
No surprise beta_plus supports Jindal doing this. In his mind republicans are never wrong in anything they ever do.
 
2012-06-29 06:18:05 PM

heap: Lando Lincoln: They don't read down there anyway.

ture, yet many, many LA residents will be disappointed - the books paste made up half of their diet.


Corrected
 
2012-06-29 06:18:50 PM
In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Jindal already said he refuses to comply with the ACA, which comes with federal money, so I'd really love to see what he calls healthcare spending.
 
2012-06-29 06:18:59 PM

Corvus: Even Nevada which they don't like to spend shiat on public stuff has pretty modernized libraries. I think CA's are much better but theirs are ok.


Not all fly-over or Red States are educational wastelands. Some highly value education. Heck, when I was stationed in rural SW Oklahoma in the early 90's my son attended the local county high school...with 212 kids in K-12. Need calculus? No problem. The University of Oklahoma piped it in to all the tiny farm schools over a rented cable channel.

Hey Gov Jindal, remember this movie line? "See the sad thing about a guy like you, is in about 50 years you're gonna start doin' some thinkin' on your own and you're gonna come up with the fact that there are two certainties in life. One, don't do that. And two, you dropped a hundred and fifty grand on a farkin' education you coulda' got for a dollar fifty in late charges at the Public Library."
 
2012-06-29 06:20:11 PM
BTW, that volcano monitoring thing still sends me into a rage. Mt. St. Helens erupted only 32 years ago, have people really forgotten that quickly?

/living wild on the Ring of Fire
 
2012-06-29 06:24:14 PM

platedlizard: BTW, that volcano monitoring thing still sends me into a rage. Mt. St. Helens erupted only 32 years ago, have people really forgotten that quickly?

/living wild on the Ring of Fire


Oh, that was a LONG TIME AGO, plus it was a random chance, plus there aren't any other active volcanoes in America, plus the next volcano due to blow is Mammoth, and I want to see that happen, so don't blow it for me.
 
2012-06-29 06:27:10 PM
Oh Bobby, I'm sorry you gotta head like a potato
I really am
 
2012-06-29 06:27:31 PM
I bet B. Piyush Jindal expands funding for state-funded madrasas. You know, because he's a Muslin. A secret Muslin. The worst kind of Muslin.
 
2012-06-29 06:40:21 PM

Skywolf Philosopher: Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.


Where in Arkansas? I live in ft. Smith and I'm not even sure a have a library...
 
2012-06-29 06:40:36 PM

Boudica's War Tampon: I bet B. Piyush Jindal expands funding for state-funded madrasas. You know, because he's a Muslin. A secret Muslin. The worst kind of Muslin.


That talk might be poplin where you're from, but I don't cotton to that mockado!
 
2012-06-29 06:40:49 PM
"Whew. Tough work pissing on the poor and dismantling infrastructure. Who needs libraries when we have FOXNEWS?"
\
media.salon.com
 
2012-06-29 06:48:06 PM

Epoch_Zero: We make satirical pictures overstating and mocking conservatives, and then they go and make them law. Irony is so abused.


It's not just American conservatism that's like this. You have to remember that any movement which invokes nationalism, paranoia, and base emotion usually finds the following things wholly unacceptable:

1. The arts.
2. The free press.
3. Higher education.

You know, the kinds of things that lead to people rejecting the stupidity of conservatism altogether,
 
2012-06-29 06:49:44 PM
It's not just you, that's actually the rationale for shutting down libraries in many places--and the REASON for doing so, since so many people aren't going to libraries any more.

Funny, my husband works in our library and they see over 1,000 people a day, in a town of 32,000 people. Maybe you are generalizing: you don't go, so no-one goes.
 
2012-06-29 06:49:49 PM

Gyrfalcon: platedlizard: BTW, that volcano monitoring thing still sends me into a rage. Mt. St. Helens erupted only 32 years ago, have people really forgotten that quickly?

/living wild on the Ring of Fire

Oh, that was a LONG TIME AGO, plus it was a random chance, plus there aren't any other active volcanoes in America, plus the next volcano due to blow is Mammoth, and I want to see that happen, so don't blow it for me.


Shush you, I wanna see Mt. Rainier go.
 
2012-06-29 06:53:16 PM

NotARocketScientist: It's not just you, that's actually the rationale for shutting down libraries in many places--and the REASON for doing so, since so many people aren't going to libraries any more.

Funny, my husband works in our library and they see over 1,000 people a day, in a town of 32,000 people. Maybe you are generalizing: you don't go, so no-one goes.



Yeah, every time I go to our local library it's hard to find parking spots and there are lines of people at the check out. Computer time is limited to 2 hr slots to ensure everyone has access, and even so there is usually a line for them, too.
 
2012-06-29 06:56:03 PM
WAR ON TOFU!
 
2012-06-29 06:56:07 PM

platedlizard: Gyrfalcon: platedlizard: BTW, that volcano monitoring thing still sends me into a rage. Mt. St. Helens erupted only 32 years ago, have people really forgotten that quickly?

/living wild on the Ring of Fire

Oh, that was a LONG TIME AGO, plus it was a random chance, plus there aren't any other active volcanoes in America, plus the next volcano due to blow is Mammoth, and I want to see that happen, so don't blow it for me.

Shush you, I wanna see Mt. Rainier go.


My wife is absolutely terrified of that thing. She calls it "The Volcano" rather than Mr. Rainier.

We just added earthquake insurance to the house, as I'm terrified of the Cascadia subduction zone, which doesn't get the kind of press it should.
 
2012-06-29 06:56:08 PM

pisceandreamer: In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Jindal already said he refuses to comply with the ACA, which comes with federal money, so I'd really love to see what he calls healthcare spending.


He's going to hate the fact that if the state doesn't do anything about exchanges (and the ACA survives past 2012), the federal government comes in and sets up the exchanges themselves.

Would be worth it to see his head asplode after that happens. :)
 
2012-06-29 06:56:50 PM
Bobby Jindal = GOP house Negro
 
2012-06-29 07:01:26 PM
Getting rid of libraries is a fantastic idea for Repugnantcans, and an extension of their assaults on education. The only way they can maintain a majority is to keep the populace really farking dumb. And it's working.

But speaking as a (sort of) librarian (have the degree, but a paraprofessional library job), I hope Jindal farking croaks.
 
2012-06-29 07:03:20 PM

Lurk sober post drunk: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x271]

"The only people who need the library are poor people so...you know...no-brainer, really."


Besides, what do they really need to read but the Bible and they can get those for free at church!

The Moslems invaded Egypt during the seventh century as their fanaticism carried them on conquests that would take form an empire stretching from Spain to India. There was not much of a struggle in Egypt and the locals found the rule of the Caliph to be more tolerant than that of the Byzantines before them. However, when a Christian called John informed the local Arab general that there existed in Alexandria a great Library preserving all the knowledge in the world he was perturbed. Eventually he sent word to Mecca where Caliph Omar ordered that all the books in the library should be destroyed because, as he said "they will either contradict the Koran, in which case they are heresy, or they will agree with it, so they are superfluous." Therefore, the books and scrolls were taken out of the library and distributed as fuel to the many bathhouses of the city. So enormous was the volume of literature that it took six months for it all to be burnt to ashes heating the saunas of the conquerors.

same as it ever was
 
2012-06-29 07:03:35 PM

mmagdalene: Bobby Jindal = GOP house Negro


I thought that post was held by Allen West.
 
2012-06-29 07:07:40 PM
Lousyanna should send Jindal a bill for all the free or near-free education he received. Fair is fair.
 
2012-06-29 07:11:19 PM

Rent Party: platedlizard: Gyrfalcon: platedlizard: BTW, that volcano monitoring thing still sends me into a rage. Mt. St. Helens erupted only 32 years ago, have people really forgotten that quickly?

/living wild on the Ring of Fire

Oh, that was a LONG TIME AGO, plus it was a random chance, plus there aren't any other active volcanoes in America, plus the next volcano due to blow is Mammoth, and I want to see that happen, so don't blow it for me.

Shush you, I wanna see Mt. Rainier go.

My wife is absolutely terrified of that thing. She calls it "The Volcano" rather than Mr. Rainier.

We just added earthquake insurance to the house, as I'm terrified of the Cascadia subduction zone, which doesn't get the kind of press it should.


Cascadia is a sleeping monster, when it goes it will be as big as the Japan earthquake and tsunami. And our earthquake infrastructure is nowhere near as good as Japan's.

Fun fact! The main danger from Mt. Rainier are lahars, which can be triggered by either eruptions or earthquakes. You don't even need an eruption to cause one! and when it goes 200,000 people will have maybe 30 minutes to evacuate or get buried under a mudslide with the approximate consistency of liquid concrete.

In other words, the Cascadia quake could end up triggering a lahar at Mt. Rainier.

I would not live between that mountain and the ocean for anything.
 
2012-06-29 07:13:42 PM
Aren't libraries where poor, out-of-work people go to use the internet? You know, so they can post their resumes to potential employers and maybe get a job?

Yea, let's shut those places down.
 
2012-06-29 07:17:14 PM
Piyush Jindal. That's his farking name. If its' "Barrack Hussein Obama," then it's "Piyush Jindal" whenever talking about this jackass. Sorry if he rejected his cultural heritage and pulled the name "Bobby" completely out of his ass.
 
2012-06-29 07:18:38 PM

StoneColdAtheist: mmagdalene: Bobby Jindal = GOP house Negro

I thought that post was held by Allen West.


Strictly yard Negro.
 
2012-06-29 07:19:47 PM

Corvus: Skywolf Philosopher: Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.

I am not surprised. Most people on FARK when they talk about libraries seem like they haven't stepped inside one for the last 20 years.


Actually, libraries are still important--paper-and-ink books have a lot of main advantages. For example, on days when I'm more likely to have a migraine, I can read a book instead of going on Fark. It's less likely to end painfully. Also, I can read without any electricity.

/Love libraries
//Don't check anything out because I'm too sporadic to return them, but still love 'em
///And try getting a copy of the Hunger Games from a library after the movie came out...
 
2012-06-29 07:20:10 PM
I'm sure the invisible hand of the free, unregulated market will fill the gap, sporting slight changes. Like instead of renting the books for free, you get to pay the market value (whatever they say it is). See? Totally profitable...er, I mean solved.
 
2012-06-29 07:25:18 PM
The town just south of my house shot down a $10 million bond to build a library. This town has fewer than10,000 people in it and there's a county branch library less than a half-mile away.
 
2012-06-29 07:28:35 PM

Thats an 827: Stanford Ushers In The Age Of Bookless Libraries


The databases those students are using can cost tens of thousands of dollars, each.
 
2012-06-29 07:31:19 PM
Libraries need a new business model. They should really just be small-scale free internet cafes with community center-style events.
 
2012-06-29 07:31:41 PM

platedlizard:
Cascadia is a sleeping monster, when it goes it will be as big as the Japan earthquake and tsunami. And our earthquake infrastructure is nowhere near as good as Japan's.

Fun fact! The main danger from Mt. Rainier are lahars, which can be triggered by either eruptions or earthquakes. You don't even need an eruption to cause one! and when it goes 200,000 people will have maybe 30 minutes to evacuate or get buried under a mudslide with the approximate consistency of liquid concrete.

In other words, the Cascadia quake could end up triggering a lahar at Mt. Rainier.

I would not live between that mountain and the ocean for anything.


Indeed. One of the things I do to calm the wife down is keep a copy of the USGS lahar map for the mountain around, so she can see we don't live in the path of one of those things. We live on a hillside over looking a lake, though, so if the Cascadia zone ever slips big time, there's a good chance we could have accidental waterfront property. Hence the new coverage.

I have a ton of family that lives in Orting, Sumner, and Puyallup, and I worry about them. I don't know about their coverage, though.

The Orting bakery (delicious) sells "lahar cookies." They're sugar cookies half dipped in chocolate. :D
 
2012-06-29 07:35:56 PM

pxsteel: rebelyell2006: FTFA: In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Libraries are a part of education. What sort of idiots voted for this retard?

No, libraries were a part of education, in a bygone era. We have a brand new library in my suburb, gorgeous architecture. When you drive by, it is a really interesting and pretty building. I don't think I have ever seen more than two cars in the parking lot at any given time.


Library usage very much varies with age.

I know a lot of couples with young kids that heavily use libraries. They go there once or twice a week to have their kids pick out a few books. Their kids go through so many books that it's a lot cheaper than buying them.

And retired people on fixed incomes are big library users because it's an expense they can eliminate from their budget.

I think that as more libraries get e-books, library usage will actually increase. While it may be fewer people using the physical infrastructure, money will be needed to buy the e-books.
 
2012-06-29 07:47:52 PM

HellRaisingHoosier: I've decided I may turn to the dark side. I mean, if this country is going to go down the shiatter, I might as well make a buck off the tools that are doing it.

Here is my master plan:

Step 1) Join a church. Pay huge donations to be listed as a member but never actually go.

Step 2) Sell "I Love God/Jesus" & "Obama is a Commie/Socialist" & "2nd Amendment protected" tshirts, pins and stickers.

Step 3) With my money, run as a Republican in a Midwestern or Southern State

Step 4) Once elected sell off Local/State assets to the highest bidder

Step 5) Enjoy every sin imaginable under the guise of being for "family values"


Ta da!

[i234.photobucket.com image 485x405]


I thinkn you forgot

Step 6) Become a lobbyist.
 
2012-06-29 07:48:56 PM
I just thank God every day that we've got a state librarian with the balls (metaphorically speaking) to stand up to Brownback, or he'd probably try the same thing.
 
2012-06-29 07:49:26 PM
This is the GOP Utopia... you pay your income taxes, and they don't waste them on frilly crap like science, libraries, or healthcare... no sir, every dime will go to subsidizing deserving corporations that are the heart of our economy, so fark you, work harder, your boss needs a new Mercedes.
 
2012-06-29 07:51:33 PM

OddLlama: Skywolf Philosopher: Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.

Where in Arkansas? I live in ft. Smith and I'm not even sure a have a library...


Looks like you've got four branches, plus UA-Ft. Smith will accept a public library card.

www.google.com
 
2012-06-29 07:54:55 PM

Scythed: Libraries need a new business model.


They aren't businesses you twit. They're a public service.
And for most people, they already 'are' free internet cafes with community service events.
 
2012-06-29 07:55:02 PM

rugman11: OddLlama: Skywolf Philosopher: Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.

Where in Arkansas? I live in ft. Smith and I'm not even sure a have a library...

Looks like you've got four branches, plus UA-Ft. Smith will accept a public library card.

[www.google.com image 424x306]


Haven't you learned anything from the healthcare threads? Fark is no place for facts.
 
2012-06-29 07:57:44 PM

mmagdalene: StoneColdAtheist: mmagdalene: Bobby Jindal = GOP house Negro

I thought that post was held by Allen West.

Strictly yard Negro.


Ouch... ;^)
 
2012-06-29 08:00:21 PM

Rent Party: platedlizard:
Cascadia is a sleeping monster, when it goes it will be as big as the Japan earthquake and tsunami. And our earthquake infrastructure is nowhere near as good as Japan's.

Fun fact! The main danger from Mt. Rainier are lahars, which can be triggered by either eruptions or earthquakes. You don't even need an eruption to cause one! and when it goes 200,000 people will have maybe 30 minutes to evacuate or get buried under a mudslide with the approximate consistency of liquid concrete.

In other words, the Cascadia quake could end up triggering a lahar at Mt. Rainier.

I would not live between that mountain and the ocean for anything.

Indeed. One of the things I do to calm the wife down is keep a copy of the USGS lahar map for the mountain around, so she can see we don't live in the path of one of those things. We live on a hillside over looking a lake, though, so if the Cascadia zone ever slips big time, there's a good chance we could have accidental waterfront property. Hence the new coverage.

I have a ton of family that lives in Orting, Sumner, and Puyallup, and I worry about them. I don't know about their coverage, though.

The Orting bakery (delicious) sells "lahar cookies." They're sugar cookies half dipped in chocolate. :D


As someone who lives south of Sumner and North of Orting - I have an auto triggered EAS radio next to my bed. Every once in a blue moon, they'll trigger a lahar 'test' at 9am on a Sunday. Usually by end of the tone, I already have my shoes on . . .

/practices evacuating twice a year
//one in a car, one on foot.
 
2012-06-29 08:08:22 PM

MrSteve007:
As someone who lives south of Sumner and North of Orting - I have an auto triggered EAS radio next to my bed. Every once in a blue moon, they'll trigger a lahar 'test' at 9am on a Sunday. Usually by end of the tone, I already have my shoes on . . .

/practices evacuating twice a year
//one in a car, one on foot.


Just out of curiosity, where do you go on foot? I'm assuming you're down there in Alderton?
 
2012-06-29 08:09:15 PM
As the husband of an archivist/library page/MA in Library Science recipient: fark you, Governor Jindal. fark you and your bullshiat VP posturing.
 
2012-06-29 08:27:04 PM

DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*


It's not is just you, but that's only part of the story. The income disparity in North America is incredible. Being online insulates us from the daily life of the people with no computer access or literacy, and they really are common in urban areas.

Also, libraries serve all sorts of purposes as public space, such as air conditioned zones for people who can't afford it, and places for people to meet without paying for it. There is no online equivalent to a library - only archives. As for you: you must have the money to buy a coffee every time you want to meet a friend in person, and the expense of buying food or drink for your kids, in private spaces like restaurants.

It is a class difference that determines access to this stuff.
 
2012-06-29 08:29:44 PM

DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*


in New Orleans alone, at least 40% of people don't have internet access at home. I'm guessing it 's even higher in other parts of the state.
 
2012-06-29 08:34:21 PM
Hmm interesting someone posts the "Reading id for F**s" in another thread. I then post the same picture in this thread, it get's deleted. Someone then posts the exact same picture in THIS thread and it doesn't get deleted.

I guess someone loves me.
 
2012-06-29 08:36:33 PM

Scythed: Libraries need a new business model. They should really just be small-scale free internet cafes with community center-style events.


Like I have been saying. That's what many libraries ARE now.

Mine near me has movies, meeting rooms and many computers for people to use. Also has downloadable e-book, audiobooks and video.
 
2012-06-29 08:37:12 PM
Everyone mark what you see and mark it well.

Louisiana is a testbed. This is what the religious conservatives have planned for the rest of the United States.

See also: Wisconsin.
 
2012-06-29 08:37:29 PM

Shaggy_C: Libraries are typically funded at the local level, hence why you are only allowed to get a library card if you live in the service area.

I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."


As the article states, the concern is for small parishes that have a poor population and thus a small tax base with which to fund such libraries. Ironically, libraries in poorer areas are often more important to the local population because they provide access to computers and librarians with knowledge of technology. Perhaps you didnt't read the article carefully enough?
 
2012-06-29 08:39:16 PM
Makes me long of the days of the Robber Barons, when Andrew Carnegie actually built free libraries all over the country and the world, because it was good for mankind.
 
2012-06-29 08:42:45 PM

Cinaed: ... Are you farking kidding me?

I await the slow leech of any and all business that expect to hire halfway intelligent people from Louisiana


I'm waiting for some smart guy in one of the blue state legislatures to propose a law requiring that people from red states pay a higher out-of-state tuition at state schools due to the increased cost of repairing the deficiencies in their education.

And I'm expecting him to have a study to back up the claim.
 
2012-06-29 08:45:13 PM

mmagdalene: StoneColdAtheist: mmagdalene: Bobby Jindal = GOP house Negro

I thought that post was held by Allen West.

Strictly yard Negro.


He pulled it off the Brady Bunch. What even Bobby Jindahl himself doesn't realize is he chose Bobby Brady because he is the reincarnation of Bobby Kennedy. Yeah yeah you don't believe me RFK was a liberal blah blah blah. That's what growing up in Louisiana will do to you. BTW in Bobby Kennedy's lifetime, abortion was a crime in all 50 states and a sin by the Catholic Church. We do have people still living in 1968 in 2012.
 
2012-06-29 08:45:55 PM

Bennie Crabtree: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

It's not is just you, but that's only part of the story. The income disparity in North America is incredible. Being online insulates us from the daily life of the people with no computer access or literacy, and they really are common in urban areas.

Also, libraries serve all sorts of purposes as public space, such as air conditioned zones for people who can't afford it, and places for people to meet without paying for it. There is no online equivalent to a library - only archives. As for you: you must have the money to buy a coffee every time you want to meet a friend in person, and the expense of buying food or drink for your kids, in private spaces like restaurants.

It is a class difference that determines access to this stuff.


I think there's also an age difference for a lot of things as well. I had a patron in today who was in his late fifties but presented himself well. He was going to New York with his wife and trying to order Broadway tickets but needed an email address, which he didn't have. I helped him set it up despite his relative lack of computer skills (when trying to find his Gmail account he Googled his email address). I gave every appearance of being middle to upper-middle class, he just lives a life that, generally, doesn't need a computer which, in our modern society (and especially on Fark) people don't seem to realize is a possibility.
 
2012-06-29 08:48:17 PM

Cinaed: Thats an 827: Stanford Ushers In The Age Of Bookless Libraries

The databases those students are using can cost tens of thousands of dollars, each.


I'm a grad student at Rutgers and the librarian there told me that by a large margin most of their budget goes to databases and other electronic data sources. They pay far less for physical books. I also read on PBS a recent report talking about public libraries dealing with the shift to ebooks. Many publishing companies are now looking to charge up to $100 for regular books and individuals are still required to wait until the ebook is "returned" to the library by whoever checked it out before them. Whoever thought switching to an electronic platform would be cheaper for libraries is sadly mistaken.
 
2012-06-29 08:48:35 PM
Oops I replied to the wrong comment. I meant to reply to the question of where did Piyush get Bobby from.
 
2012-06-29 08:49:59 PM

coco ebert: librarians with knowledge of technology.


Interesting, I've never met a librarian with knowledge of technology. They tend to, for some reason, be stuck completely in the dead tree media that they're surrounded with and were required to get masters degrees in a dead end major to even work there.
 
2012-06-29 08:53:52 PM

coco ebert: Shaggy_C: Libraries are typically funded at the local level, hence why you are only allowed to get a library card if you live in the service area.

I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."

As the article states, the concern is for small parishes that have a poor population and thus a small tax base with which to fund such libraries. Ironically, libraries in poorer areas are often more important to the local population because they provide access to computers and librarians with knowledge of technology. Perhaps you didnt't read the article carefully enough?


To emphasize this point further, libraries in urban areas can generally rely on local taxes to maintain services, but libraries in rural areas are often far more reliant on state funding to state afloat. In Kansas, for example, most rural school and public libraries rely on a State of Kansas program (Kan-Ed) for their broadband service. Without subsidization from the state government, it would be far too expensive for them to receive such services otherwise. For those saying "everything is online", it's important to remember that not everybody has reasonably priced access to broadband services.
 
2012-06-29 08:55:11 PM

Bennie Crabtree: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

It's not is just you, but that's only part of the story. The income disparity in North America is incredible. Being online insulates us from the daily life of the people with no computer access or literacy, and they really are common in urban areas.

Also, libraries serve all sorts of purposes as public space, such as air conditioned zones for people who can't afford it, and places for people to meet without paying for it. There is no online equivalent to a library - only archives. As for you: you must have the money to buy a coffee every time you want to meet a friend in person, and the expense of buying food or drink for your kids, in private spaces like restaurants.

It is a class difference that determines access to this stuff.


Yup. Make no mistake, these battles are not about money only. It's about a right-wing ideology that seeks to dismantle PUBLIC institutions that bring together people of all backgrounds and relies on a societal contract we make to support a variety of services and institutions that serve the greater good. They are often able to pull the wool over people's eyes because they do it institution by institution: education, health care, libraries, infrastructure, etc. They simply do not believe in these things. It's less to do with fiscal soundness and more to do with the fact that they don't believe in society, but rather a collection of individuals who bear no responsibility towards one another, only to him or herself. To me this is the single biggest problem in America today.
 
2012-06-29 08:55:21 PM

Corvus: lockers: I go for books that I want to read since I pay for some small portion of them. Then again I read for pleasure and entertainment. Hell, in my library system I have ebooks, audio books (including mp3), videos and music. I have seen some systems that do video games. The main branch have research librarians who will give you selections for specific subjects, given certain criteria that may require more knowledge than google can provide. Not to mention access to scholarly articles where I have actually gone to where I could not find a free online resource for. I go anywhere from once a month to maybe four times. Not to mention the occasional kid oriented events they do. Libraries do so much more for a community than give you access to books that it isn't funny.

Almost ll libraries do that now. These "experts" who are going "hurrr hurr books are outdated we should get rid of libraries" are idiots who don't know what they are talking about. Surprise, surprise.

I know a librarian and she would tell me how swamped they were for computer usage. They had to run really stick limits for computer access because it would go all day with many people in line waiting.


There's also free air conditioning.

/and dvds, cds, books on tape, maker classes and physically present attractive people who read
 
2012-06-29 08:56:13 PM

Endrick: coco ebert: librarians with knowledge of technology.

Interesting, I've never met a librarian with knowledge of technology. They tend to, for some reason, be stuck completely in the dead tree media that they're surrounded with and were required to get masters degrees in a dead end major to even work there.


i don't mean tech-savvy per se, but people who know how to set up an email account, search on the internet, etc.
 
2012-06-29 08:57:17 PM
Georgia libraries also give you access to Galileo.
 
2012-06-29 08:57:45 PM

rugman11: coco ebert: Shaggy_C: Libraries are typically funded at the local level, hence why you are only allowed to get a library card if you live in the service area.

I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."

As the article states, the concern is for small parishes that have a poor population and thus a small tax base with which to fund such libraries. Ironically, libraries in poorer areas are often more important to the local population because they provide access to computers and librarians with knowledge of technology. Perhaps you didnt't read the article carefully enough?

To emphasize this point further, libraries in urban areas can generally rely on local taxes to maintain services, but libraries in rural areas are often far more reliant on state funding to state afloat. In Kansas, for example, most rural school and public libraries rely on a State of Kansas program (Kan-Ed) for their broadband service. Without subsidization from the state government, it would be far too expensive for them to receive such services otherwise. For those saying "everything is online", it's important to remember that not everybody has reasonably priced access to broadband services.


Yup. That was what I meant to say but you said it far more eloquently than I did.
 
2012-06-29 08:58:11 PM
Oh dear, now homeless people in Louisiana won't have anywhere to go to masturbate to kiddie porn. Why won't someone think of the homeless pedophiles?
 
2012-06-29 08:59:47 PM
We're onto you, Piyush "Bobby" Lucius Domitius Aurelianus Augustus Jindal!
 
2012-06-29 09:01:40 PM

mmagdalene: StoneColdAtheist: mmagdalene: Bobby Jindal = GOP house Negro

I thought that post was held by Allen West.

Strictly yard Negro.


Ha! just thought I'd add a bit of this history to the conversation: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=znQe9nUKzvQ

/dunno how to link with ipad
 
2012-06-29 09:02:47 PM
Add me to the list of library defenders. Those of you who live in affluent suburbs may believe that libraries are desolate, empty places or glorified play-centers for the spawn of soccer moms, but for a large number of citizens they are the only place to access the technology resources and knowledge you probably take for granted.

I've been involved in the "community technology center" movement for over a decade and today our centers (located in libraries for the most part) are busier than they ever have been. In many ways, increased access generally has made the "digital divide" even sharper because non-participation is simply no longer an option.

People show up early to get their name on the waiting list to get a computer. And almost everyone there is trying to access some necessary resource, like applying for jobs or reporting said job applications for Unemployment.

Seriously, anyone who says "why do we need libraries if we have the Internet" is living in blissful ignorance.
 
2012-06-29 09:03:48 PM

coco ebert: Cinaed: Thats an 827: Stanford Ushers In The Age Of Bookless Libraries

The databases those students are using can cost tens of thousands of dollars, each.

I'm a grad student at Rutgers and the librarian there told me that by a large margin most of their budget goes to databases and other electronic data sources. They pay far less for physical books. I also read on PBS a recent report talking about public libraries dealing with the shift to ebooks. Many publishing companies are now looking to charge up to $100 for regular books and individuals are still required to wait until the ebook is "returned" to the library by whoever checked it out before them. Whoever thought switching to an electronic platform would be cheaper for libraries is sadly mistaken.


As a former academic librarian, I can confirm all of this. We spent four times as much on our electronic databases as our books. Our subscription to the American Chemical Society's journals ran $25,000/yr for about 40 journals. And that's for a school of roughly 5,000 full-time students (most subscriptions are based on the number of students). Business Source Premier ran us $15,000/yr. The state of Kansas is about to pay half a million dollars per year for access to EBSCO's databases for all of its schools, colleges, and public libraries.

In terms of books, no publisher has been willing to change the lending model. The library that I'm currently at has access to Overdrive, but you "check out" books just as you would with a print copy, meaning when one person downloads it, nobody else gets it for two weeks. Also, publishers are starting to embargo their books, preventing libraries from lending them for months. Plus, the copies we purchase for lending expire after a year or so. The library e-book model is being held back by the publishers, not the librarians.
 
2012-06-29 09:04:12 PM
Brilliant strategy there...
 
2012-06-29 09:08:00 PM

Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.


Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.
 
2012-06-29 09:09:57 PM

Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.


Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?
 
2012-06-29 09:12:37 PM

cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?


Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding is moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.
 
2012-06-29 09:15:55 PM

Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding is moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.


War on LibrariesTM
 
2012-06-29 09:17:00 PM

Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding burdenis moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.


FTFY.

And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?
 
2012-06-29 09:17:18 PM

rugman11: coco ebert: Cinaed: Thats an 827: Stanford Ushers In The Age Of Bookless Libraries

The databases those students are using can cost tens of thousands of dollars, each.

I'm a grad student at Rutgers and the librarian there told me that by a large margin most of their budget goes to databases and other electronic data sources. They pay far less for physical books. I also read on PBS a recent report talking about public libraries dealing with the shift to ebooks. Many publishing companies are now looking to charge up to $100 for regular books and individuals are still required to wait until the ebook is "returned" to the library by whoever checked it out before them. Whoever thought switching to an electronic platform would be cheaper for libraries is sadly mistaken.

As a former academic librarian, I can confirm all of this. We spent four times as much on our electronic databases as our books. Our subscription to the American Chemical Society's journals ran $25,000/yr for about 40 journals. And that's for a school of roughly 5,000 full-time students (most subscriptions are based on the number of students). Business Source Premier ran us $15,000/yr. The state of Kansas is about to pay half a million dollars per year for access to EBSCO's databases for all of its schools, colleges, and public libraries.

In terms of books, no publisher has been willing to change the lending model. The library that I'm currently at has access to Overdrive, but you "check out" books just as you would with a print copy, meaning when one person downloads it, nobody else gets it for two weeks. Also, publishers are starting to embargo their books, preventing libraries from lending them for months. Plus, the copies we purchase for lending expire after a year or so. The library e-book model is being held back by the publishers, not the librarians.


Interesting. Among academics there is also a growing backlash against the exorbitant fees charged by publishing companies of academic journals. Particularly when so much of research is funded by public moneys, the argument is that much of those findings should be open access to the public. Somewhat of a different topic, but interesting nonetheless: http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120424/03471718625/even-harvard-can t-afford-subscriptions-to-academic-journals-pushes-open-access.shtml
 
2012-06-29 09:20:00 PM

rugman11: Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding burdenis moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.

FTFY.

And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?


If they want the program they will pay for it. They will cut something else or they will raise revenue. It's not complicated, it's what they are elected or appointed to do. If they do something stupid like shut down the library or let it fall into disrepair, they will be out of a job (particularly in the rural county mentioned).

I don't know why you need this explained! Do schools not teach civics anymore? This is how government works. Some programs work better at local, some at state, some at federal. These questions are simple and you could answer them yourself if you thought before replying.
 
2012-06-29 09:26:06 PM

rugman11: Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding burdenis moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.

FTFY.

And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?


They charge for library cards? Raise late fees? Funding drives? Liberrians are supposed to be smart. They'll think of a way to keep the doors open for porn surfers.
 
2012-06-29 09:35:49 PM

Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.


My response was directed toward the multitude of people in this very thread and elsewhere who are suggesting that libraries are simply no longer needed, period. These same people try to eliminate local funding as well.

So yes, there are people attacking libraries, and those of us who care about them are trying to protect funding at any level where we receive it.
 
2012-06-29 09:37:25 PM

Cromar: rugman11: Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding burdenis moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.

FTFY.

And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?

If they want the program they will pay for it. They will cut something else or they will raise revenue. It's not complicated, it's what they are elected or appointed to do. If they do something stupid like shut down the library or let it fall into disrepair, they will be out of a job (particularly in the rural county mentioned).

I don't know why you need this explained! Do schools not teach civics anymore? This is how government works. Some programs work better at local, some at state, some at federal. These questions are simple and you could answer them yourself if you thought before replying.


And in a state with a disparate mix of rural and urban population, education initiatives often work better at the state level because it allows both urban and rural areas to provide equal access to essential services.

Because God forbid the people of Louisiana pay an extra $.20 per person to ensure that the people of East Carroll Parish (per capita income of $9,629) have roughly equal access to information as the people of St. Tammany Parish (per capita income of $22,514).
 
2012-06-29 09:37:47 PM
A Louisianan shows up at Harvard to study. He asks a lady, "Excuse me, where is the library at?"

Shocked, she replies, "Don't you know anything? Never end a sentence with a preposition!"

The Louisianan pauses for a moment and then says, "Okay... where is the library at, biatch?"
 
2012-06-29 09:41:49 PM
www.biography.com

Spinning in his grave
 
2012-06-29 09:43:18 PM

LouDobbsAwaaaay: Muta: Speaking of Jindal and waste ...

[wonkroom.thinkprogress.org image 512x384]

Indeed. If Louisiana has no libraries, what will Jindal throw into the ocean the next time the coast is threatened?


I don't remember this story, possibly because I usually don't pay much attention to Jindal. Care to re-enlighten?
 
2012-06-29 09:49:38 PM
Your libraries are being threatened with closure? These people came up with a solution that worked. Of course Michigan is not Louisiana.
 
2012-06-29 09:50:13 PM

rugman11: And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?


That's thinking things through. Republicans are against that.
 
2012-06-29 09:51:06 PM

lilbjorn: [www.biography.com image 402x402]

Spinning in his grave


probably just saying "Boooooooooooo.... charge them to borrow books.... Boooooooooooooo."
 
2012-06-29 09:51:36 PM

vernonFL: Our college library had a guy who everyone called 'the mystery masturbator', and he was never identified or caught.

Several students saw him jacking it in the library on numerous occasions.


I saw so many penii in the public library when I was in high school that it made up for the fact that they wouldn't teach sex ed.
 
2012-06-29 09:52:06 PM

PsiChick: Corvus: Skywolf Philosopher: Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.

I am not surprised. Most people on FARK when they talk about libraries seem like they haven't stepped inside one for the last 20 years.

Actually, libraries are still important--paper-and-ink books have a lot of main advantages. For example, on days when I'm more likely to have a migraine, I can read a book instead of going on Fark. It's less likely to end painfully. Also, I can read without any electricity.

/Love libraries
//Don't check anything out because I'm too sporadic to return them, but still love 'em
///And try getting a copy of the Hunger Games from a library after the movie came out...


I did. Took three weeks for the reservation to come in. I love my local library, and I usually visit it one every couple weeks. If they don't have the book, I reserve it online, then fetch it when available. Plus, the reference librarians are great and have access to resources that surpass Google in some cases, and give me requested information in a reasonable amount of time.
 
2012-06-29 09:57:08 PM
I use the local branch of the Somerville library all the time. The glorious Minuteman Library Network means I can go on-line, pick a book from a pretty far-ranging list, and within a week it's been delivered from within a 30-mile radius. Because it's a huge pooling of hundreds of regional libraries, they can keep obscure titles in-stock and there will always be some kind of demand, which means that those books aren't retired.

The funny thing, I'm a pretty technical guy, but I don't much care for e-books. I still like dead tree books.
 
2012-06-29 10:00:23 PM
Yeah, history never repeats itself.

Peasant-ize the population enough just so you can be a little richer. Your descendants will never go the way of Marie Antoinette.
 
2012-06-29 10:04:05 PM

Egalitarian: Yeah, history never repeats itself.

Peasant-ize the population enough just so you can be a little richer. Your descendants will never go the way of Marie Antoinette.


*rolleyes*
 
2012-06-29 10:12:26 PM

Scythed: Libraries need a new business model. They should really just be small-scale free internet cafes with community center-style events.


Libraries and governments are NOT BUISNESSES. They should not operate under the same assumptions and rules.
 
2012-06-29 10:14:46 PM

Cromar: If they want the program they will pay for it.


Oh, I see. If they want libraries, they should gut a bunch of other programs, rather than, oh, I don't know, asking an organization that has a sh*t ton more money than they do to help them.
 
2012-06-29 10:30:17 PM

mmagdalene: StoneColdAtheist: mmagdalene: Bobby Jindal = GOP house Negro

I thought that post was held by Allen West.

Strictly yard Negro.


Jindal is the "Lascar" of the GOP. (i.e. Indian man-servant)
 
2012-06-29 10:33:51 PM

coco ebert: Bennie Crabtree: It is a class difference that determines access to this stuff.

Yup. Make no mistake, these battles are not about money only. It's about a right-wing ideology that seeks to dismantle PUBLIC institutions that bring together people of all backgrounds and relies on a societal contract we make to support a variety of services and institutions that serve the greater good. They are often able to pull the wool over people's eyes because they do it institution by institution: education, health care, libraries, infrastructure, etc. They simply do not believe in these things. It's less to do with fiscal soundness and more to do with the fact that they don't believe in society, but rather a collection of individuals who bear no responsibility towards one another, only to him or herself. To me this is the single biggest problem in America today.


I saw this first hand while stationed at Barksdale AFB in Shreveport, LA. White gentile locals would NOT rub elbows with blacks, much less permit their children to go to school with them; live next door to them, or include them in their social lives. I sensed they were deeply offended by developments in America since the Civil Rights era. As if the country had turned its back on their God-given right to have a privileged place. And I'm not talking about experiencing this in the abstract. I saw it with my own eyes and heard it directly from their lips.

So I am not surprised that white southerners (the GOP-base) are now tearing down public institutions. They don't use them and they don't want to pay for them. They can't deny access to them by blacks and poor whites, so they just defund them, secure in their gated neighborhoods where they send their kids to all-white private schools, belong to all-white clubs, etc.
 
2012-06-29 10:40:07 PM
We've got to get our unskilled laborers to work in the salt mines from somewhere...
 
2012-06-29 10:44:30 PM

The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: We've got to get our unskilled laborers to work in the salt mines from somewhere...


we already get them from the places that would be adversely effected by $900k less statewide and they currently DO have that $16k in state library funding
 
2012-06-29 10:49:02 PM
FTFA: In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Actually, no. Jindal's full of sh*t with that one. He's actually bragged that he hasn't put any funding into the state's health care system, and swears to resist allowing ANY part of the Affordable Healthcare Act into LA, even after it was declare 100% Constitutional.
 
2012-06-29 10:49:54 PM
Well, the average John Q republican on the street isn't a big reader.
 
2012-06-29 10:55:55 PM

StoneColdAtheist: coco ebert: Bennie Crabtree: It is a class difference that determines access to this stuff.

Yup. Make no mistake, these battles are not about money only. It's about a right-wing ideology that seeks to dismantle PUBLIC institutions that bring together people of all backgrounds and relies on a societal contract we make to support a variety of services and institutions that serve the greater good. They are often able to pull the wool over people's eyes because they do it institution by institution: education, health care, libraries, infrastructure, etc. They simply do not believe in these things. It's less to do with fiscal soundness and more to do with the fact that they don't believe in society, but rather a collection of individuals who bear no responsibility towards one another, only to him or herself. To me this is the single biggest problem in America today.

I saw this first hand while stationed at Barksdale AFB in Shreveport, LA. White gentile locals would NOT rub elbows with blacks, much less permit their children to go to school with them; live next door to them, or include them in their social lives. I sensed they were deeply offended by developments in America since the Civil Rights era. As if the country had turned its back on their God-given right to have a privileged place. And I'm not talking about experiencing this in the abstract. I saw it with my own eyes and heard it directly from their lips.

So I am not surprised that white southerners (the GOP-base) are now tearing down public institutions. They don't use them and they don't want to pay for them. They can't deny access to them by blacks and poor whites, so they just defund them, secure in their gated neighborhoods where they send their kids to all-white private schools, belong to all-white clubs, etc.


farking sad to hear.
 
2012-06-29 11:00:11 PM

TheBigJerk: I don't remember this story, possibly because I usually don't pay much attention to Jindal. Care to re-enlighten?


BP oil spill. Jindal wanted to re-enforce the sand berms just beyond the coast to protect the LA coastline. Scientists and federal agencies warned him it was a colossal waste of time and money, during a national emergency no less, but Jindal was all about parading in front of the cameras and declaring that he alone was willing to do what needed to be done to save the state.

A detailed report came out later that highlighted Jindal's berms as the giant waste that everybody said they would be, and large amounts of equipment were lost as the berms eroded (again, exactly as he was warned they would be) and carried the construction equipment off with them. Hence the photo.
 
2012-06-29 11:01:59 PM

StoneColdAtheist: I saw this first hand while stationed at Barksdale AFB in Shreveport, LA. White gentile locals would NOT rub elbows with blacks, much less permit their children to go to school with them; live next door to them, or include them in their social lives. I sensed they were deeply offended by developments in America since the Civil Rights era. As if the country had turned its back on their God-given right to have a privileged place. And I'm not talking about experiencing this in the abstract. I saw it with my own eyes and heard it directly from their lips.

So I am not surprised that white southerners (the GOP-base) are now tearing down public institutions. They don't use them and they don't want to pay for them. They can't deny access to them by blacks and poor whites, so they just defund them, secure in their gated neighborhoods where they send their kids to all-white private schools, belong to all-white clubs, etc.


They've been offended by this since the Reconstruction, actually.
 
2012-06-29 11:04:59 PM

TV's Vinnie: FTFA: In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Actually, no. Jindal's full of sh*t with that one. He's actually bragged that he hasn't put any funding into the state's health care system, and swears to resist allowing ANY part of the Affordable Healthcare Act into LA, even after it was declare 100% Constitutional.


It'll be ok, there's a provision for the federal government to roll in and set up an exchange should a state fail to do so... the good people of Louisiana will extend what is widely considered to be basic humane treatment to all the residents of the state, even if it is over their passionate and adamant objections.
 
2012-06-29 11:21:41 PM

beta_plus: Oh dear, now homeless people in Louisiana won't have anywhere to go to masturbate to kiddie porn. Why won't someone think of the homeless pedophiles?


Do you ever get tired of being a hatemongering asshole? It was bad enough when you cheered when rep Giffords got shot.
 
2012-06-29 11:26:34 PM

beta_plus: Oh dear, now homeless people in Louisiana won't have anywhere to go to masturbate to kiddie porn. Why won't someone think of the homeless pedophiles?


Yes, because there's a few bad apples out there, let's do away with the entire thing.

On the premise that you're a worthless sack, when do we get to start expelling all the conservatives?
 
2012-06-29 11:28:55 PM

DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*


Libraries are places where people without computers - or with poor or no internet access at home - can go to get online. Everyone can check out e-books for free, and many offer a variety of classes on how to use computers. Some might even still have books.
 
2012-06-29 11:39:01 PM

taxandspend: [www.freewilliamsburg.com image 359x289]
"The library is the worst group of people ever assembled in history. They're mean, conniving, rude, and extremely well-read, which makes them dangerous."


ooh, can this be an Aubrey and Rashida thread??! I'll start

media.avclub.com

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-06-29 11:41:25 PM

Cromar: rugman11: Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding burdenis moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.

FTFY.

And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?

If they want the program they will pay for it. They will cut something else or they will raise revenue. It's not complicated, it's what they are elected or appointed to do. If they do something stupid like shut down the library or let it fall into disrepair, they will be out of a job (particularly in the rural county mentioned).

I don't know why you need this explained! Do schools not teach civics anymore? This is how government works. Some programs work better at local, some at state, some at federal. These questions are simple and you could answer them yourself if you thought before replying.


In MO and probably a lot of other states, state level funding is used to buy resources ( generally periodical databases) that all libraries can access - the scale of it allows for discounts that result in much lower costs than if it was every local system for itself, thus less overall tax revenue expended
 
2012-06-29 11:56:00 PM
And when the Libraries close, they have a way with dealing with the books that will save them from storage charges.

img705.imageshack.us
 
2012-06-29 11:59:54 PM

skullkrusher: taxandspend: [www.freewilliamsburg.com image 359x289]
"The library is the worst group of people ever assembled in history. They're mean, conniving, rude, and extremely well-read, which makes them dangerous."

ooh, can this be an Aubrey and Rashida thread??! I'll start

[media.avclub.com image 627x325]

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 605x421]


How is that even a real thing. Rashida of course. She's a kitten killer.
 
2012-06-30 12:00:31 AM

Endrick: coco ebert: librarians with knowledge of technology.

Interesting, I've never met a librarian with knowledge of technology. They tend to, for some reason, be stuck completely in the dead tree media that they're surrounded with and were required to get masters degrees in a dead end major to even work there.


Hi there. I'm a librarian, you stupid towel stain. My degree included database programming, statistical analysis, and cognitive psychology, among other things. I have, you might say, a knowledge of technology. Most of us do, these days.

I do sincerely hope you were trolling. That way I could blame your post on attempted humor and not idiocy.
 
2012-06-30 12:04:42 AM
www.gq.com
I rest my case.
 
2012-06-30 12:05:27 AM

mrshowrules: skullkrusher: taxandspend: [www.freewilliamsburg.com image 359x289]
"The library is the worst group of people ever assembled in history. They're mean, conniving, rude, and extremely well-read, which makes them dangerous."

ooh, can this be an Aubrey and Rashida thread??! I'll start

[media.avclub.com image 627x325]

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 605x421]

How is that even a real thing. Rashida of course. She's a kitten killer.


not nearly as shiny as her old man

www.achievement.org
 
2012-06-30 12:08:50 AM

skullkrusher: mrshowrules: skullkrusher: taxandspend: [www.freewilliamsburg.com image 359x289]
"The library is the worst group of people ever assembled in history. They're mean, conniving, rude, and extremely well-read, which makes them dangerous."

ooh, can this be an Aubrey and Rashida thread??! I'll start

[media.avclub.com image 627x325]

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 605x421]

How is that even a real thing. Rashida of course. She's a kitten killer.

not nearly as shiny as her old man

[www.achievement.org image 300x235]


If I had to sleep with him to get to her, I would do it.
 
2012-06-30 12:10:00 AM

mrshowrules: skullkrusher: mrshowrules: skullkrusher: taxandspend: [www.freewilliamsburg.com image 359x289]
"The library is the worst group of people ever assembled in history. They're mean, conniving, rude, and extremely well-read, which makes them dangerous."

ooh, can this be an Aubrey and Rashida thread??! I'll start

[media.avclub.com image 627x325]

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 605x421]

How is that even a real thing. Rashida of course. She's a kitten killer.

not nearly as shiny as her old man

[www.achievement.org image 300x235]

If I had to sleep with him to get to her, I would do it.


he's probably pretty experienced in the boudoir. Maybe it wouldn't be so bad?
 
2012-06-30 12:18:09 AM
Do you know who else reads books?

Them there money boys in New York City.

Yeah, I think you know exactly who the fark I mean.

/reverse Godwin?
 
2012-06-30 12:47:46 AM

seventypercent: Do you know who else reads books?

Them there money boys in New York City.

Yeah, I think you know exactly who the fark I mean.

/reverse Godwin?


NEW YORK CITY?!??!?
 
2012-06-30 12:56:48 AM

mrshowrules: [www.gq.com image 628x434]
I rest my case.


She won't be having my children. Mostly because of circumstance. Her loss.
 
2012-06-30 01:08:04 AM
sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2012-06-30 01:46:07 AM

theorellior: The funny thing, I'm a pretty technical guy, but I don't much care for e-books. I still like dead tree books.


You are definitely not the only one. eBooks are fantastic for reference, they're great for basic reading, but relaxation, having something with a battery meter is just more stress. If I'm relaxing - really relaxing - I've got a dead tree.

And I'm a Librarian.

Empty Matchbook: As the husband of an archivist/library page/MA in Library Science recipient: fark you, Governor Jindal. fark you and your bullshiat VP posturing.


As a fellow out-of-work librarian (doing a job I hate while searching for a real position) amen. This is going to hurt the same people who got battered by Katrina.

beta_plus: Oh dear, now homeless people in Louisiana won't have anywhere to go to masturbate to kiddie porn. Why won't someone think of the homeless pedophiles?


While that is a concern for a lot of public librarians, it is hardly the most annoying/frustrating part of our days. Most of us would rather help a homeless person out. If they are abusive, or harassing, then you call for either security, if your library has such a need, or a local police officer. It's more a gripe/personal annoyance. I'd put it up there with the guy from logistics that never refills the coffee pot in the morning. Beside, is it better to cut of service for a bad person when it cuts a service to 1000 regular patrons a day?

jestme: Libraries are places where people without computers - or with poor or no internet access at home - can go to get online. Everyone can check out e-books for free, and many offer a variety of classes on how to use computers. Some might even still have books.


It feels like that sometimes -you spend a lot of time dealing with the tech, so much it feels good to just get into the everyday work occasionally - shelve for yourself, not wait for a volunteer to do it.

And trust me, it's not easy. Not every librarian is a techie, not by far. Lemme dig out a CSB:

When I was library school a few years back, I did a course on how to do research librarianship. Using specialized databases for scholarly research, that sort of thing. We had this nice lady - early 50's, mid 50's - going for her masters.This was her first college course since before she had children more then 25 years before. She never had a computer, her job never required one, and her library was small and private; they were still using cards and typewriters. She had mentored plenty of LS students in her library, and each she help one earned her a free course. She had enough earned credits to finish the degree she started over 25 years ago (long before computers). But she was scared to death of the computer. She knew she needed to learn to finish her schooling.

The course was honestly very boring for me - I've been using these search engines for years, and the professor saw that. So with the professor's blessing we sat down together and hammered out a course of work. I assisted her with her class work, and mentored her in basic computer use, from how to use Word as more then a fancy typewriter, how to find basic information, how to use popular websites, all the way to searching Lexus-Nexus, DIALOG (yes, it's still used) and Web of Science. She passed with a B+ and I got, of course, and A. I wrote the experience up as a paper which I submitted as an independent study on how to improve our program for students with technophobia. Which earned me a second A, and took a course of my work load so my final semester I could double-up and do one course along with my Practicum plus work, so I graduated a semester yearly.

/people from all socio-economic classes use libraries
//and everyone should pay for them
///Jindal is an idiot.
 
2012-06-30 02:34:31 AM
FTA: "Concordia formerly got $12,000 per year from the state, which it used to "keep up all of the maintenance [on its 52 PCs], buy new software, and to buy new equipment as needed."

52 very well used computers plus software... and only $12k a year for maintenance, software and upgrades from the state? Who are they getting tho do this, Scruffy from Futurama?
Proof positive that the efforts in Louisiana to make everyone as stupid as he is by Bobby J are finally coming to reality.
/f*ck you Jindal
 
2012-06-30 02:54:07 AM

saintstryfe: /people from all socio-economic classes use libraries


Amen. Public libraries are for many people, the on-ramp to the information superhighway. And they are lots more than books. Movies, Music, Art, and other things that many folks would never get exposed to come together at the Public Library.

/Disclaimer
//Member, Board of Directors, Local Friends of the Library
///Also, Local Public Library Foundation
////Also, awaiting appointment to the Library Board of Trustees
 
2012-06-30 03:05:02 AM

Rent Party: platedlizard: Gyrfalcon: platedlizard: BTW, that volcano monitoring thing still sends me into a rage. Mt. St. Helens erupted only 32 years ago, have people really forgotten that quickly?

/living wild on the Ring of Fire

Oh, that was a LONG TIME AGO, plus it was a random chance, plus there aren't any other active volcanoes in America, plus the next volcano due to blow is Mammoth, and I want to see that happen, so don't blow it for me.

Shush you, I wanna see Mt. Rainier go.

My wife is absolutely terrified of that thing. She calls it "The Volcano" rather than Mr. Rainier.

We just added earthquake insurance to the house, as I'm terrified of the Cascadia subduction zone, which doesn't get the kind of press it should.


I read a great book on the Cascadia subduction zone recently, borrowed from the Toronto library.

That's one thing I could live without seeing play out. The Indian Ocean and Japan were bad enough.

Incidentally, if you want a reason for maintaining paper copies of various works, imagine an extended power outage or shortage with no way to consistetly charge your e-reader or phone, or an incident that wipes out comm links and local data storage in one shot. All of a sudden, those dead-tree data storage media don't look quite so obsolete. Backups are necessary.
 
2012-06-30 03:12:49 AM
Has anyone here actually been to a library since the Kindle came out?
 
2012-06-30 03:21:23 AM
It's so odd to read these "libraries are dead, digital is the eternal future" while reading A Canticle for Leibowitz.

It can all come to a crashing halt in a very short period of time. We should be careful.
 
2012-06-30 03:30:58 AM

Ehh: So when an ultra-rich job creator gave away a fortune to build libraries across America, he was in fact under the influence of a snot-dripping libtard demon?

/an invisible demon


Obviously, Carnegie was a RINO.
 
2012-06-30 06:38:54 AM

PlatinumDragon: Rent Party: platedlizard: Gyrfalcon: platedlizard: BTW, that volcano monitoring thing still sends me into a rage. Mt. St. Helens erupted only 32 years ago, have people really forgotten that quickly?

/living wild on the Ring of Fire

Oh, that was a LONG TIME AGO, plus it was a random chance, plus there aren't any other active volcanoes in America, plus the next volcano due to blow is Mammoth, and I want to see that happen, so don't blow it for me.

Shush you, I wanna see Mt. Rainier go.

My wife is absolutely terrified of that thing. She calls it "The Volcano" rather than Mr. Rainier.

We just added earthquake insurance to the house, as I'm terrified of the Cascadia subduction zone, which doesn't get the kind of press it should.

I read a great book on the Cascadia subduction zone recently, borrowed from the Toronto library.

That's one thing I could live without seeing play out. The Indian Ocean and Japan were bad enough.

Incidentally, if you want a reason for maintaining paper copies of various works, imagine an extended power outage or shortage with no way to consistetly charge your e-reader or phone, or an incident that wipes out comm links and local data storage in one shot. All of a sudden, those dead-tree data storage media don't look quite so obsolete. Backups are necessary.


They can have my books when they pry them from my gnarled Ent-like hands.
 
2012-06-30 06:40:25 AM
Ray Bradbury saw this coming.
And here we are.
 
2012-06-30 08:05:30 AM
FTFA "There's no longer a food stamp office; there's no longer a social security office. In our rural parish, a lot of our people have low literacy skills and very few computer skills...there's no mass transportation and a lot of our people do not have transportation to a place that's two hours away.

This is what the Republicans want. Seriously. The well-to-do live in first world enclaves, while the rest of the country falls into third world squalor, because anything else is redistributing wealth in the form of social services.
 
2012-06-30 08:12:14 AM

Corvus: skipjack: It's clear many in this thread DRTFA.

/classic liberal blunder, get all the info you need from the title and project from there.

It said he was cutting state funding and many municipalities won't have enough money to cover it and they will need to close.

What did we miss exactly?


Thanks for proving my point entirely. If you had RTFA, nowhere does it state that many municipalities wont' have enough money to cover it and will need to close.
 
2012-06-30 08:15:11 AM

rebelyell2006: skipjack: It's clear many in this thread DRTFA.

/classic liberal blunder, get all the info you need from the title and project from there.

FTFA: Citing budget concerns, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal has signed a $25-billion budget that eliminates almost $900,000 in state funding for its libraries.

Nice try, troll.


So, are you dumb enough to think that the total of library funding in the state of Louisiana is $900,000?
 
2012-06-30 09:06:47 AM

azazyel: Corvus: pxsteel: No, libraries were a part of education, in a bygone era. We have a brand new library in my suburb, gorgeous architecture. When you drive by, it is a really interesting and pretty building. I don't think I have ever seen more than two cars in the parking lot at any given time.

The one in my neighborhood is filled all the time. Also that doesn't count the downloadable ebooks they have on their website.


My local library is always packed too. And the Seattle library has a HUGE amount of tech books online. It's really great when you're trying to learn something.


I live in a suburb of Baton Rouge -- capital of Louisiana. The two nearest public library branches are always packed, even early in the morning, what with story hours, and mini-buses from the nearby retirement homes, and job-hunters using the public-access computers, and students working on papers. Speaking as a career librarian, they also have a pretty good collection for a not-large city. Baton Rouge is even one-third into the construction of a new central library, to replace the 50-year-old inadequate structure.

Local funding for libraries in this state is via a millage -- a sales tax voted on every ten years (to permit long-term planning) -- and the latest vote two years ago passed overwhelmingly, despite opposition from local right-wing anti-all-taxes forces.

So the citizens of Baton Rouge use their library system heavily, and they favor public support of the library. Unfortunately, the legislature is controlled by rural and small-town Louisiana, and it's the ignorant, Bible-thumper, non-reading rednecks in those areas who elected Jindal.
 
2012-06-30 09:36:40 AM

mksmith: azazyel: Corvus: pxsteel: No, libraries were a part of education, in a bygone era. We have a brand new library in my suburb, gorgeous architecture. When you drive by, it is a really interesting and pretty building. I don't think I have ever seen more than two cars in the parking lot at any given time.

The one in my neighborhood is filled all the time. Also that doesn't count the downloadable ebooks they have on their website.

Bravo for Red Stick.
If more municipalities did things like that, library funding would be safe from the Bobby Jindals of the world/

/Law librarian
/Our legislature has cut the judiciary's budget by over 25% in the past six years.
/The State Law Library lost 60% of its staff.
My local library is always packed too. And the Seattle library has a HUGE amount of tech books online. It's really great when you're trying to learn something.

I live in a suburb of Baton Rouge -- capital of Louisiana. The two nearest public library branches are always packed, even early in the morning, what with story hours, and mini-buses from the nearby retirement homes, and job-hunters using the public-access computers, and students working on papers. Speaking as a career librarian, they also have a pretty good collection for a not-large city. Baton Rouge is even one-third into the construction of a new central library, to replace the 50-year-old inadequate structure.

Local funding for libraries in this state is via a millage -- a sales tax voted on every ten years (to permit long-term planning) -- and the latest vote two years ago passed overwhelmingly, despite opposition from local right-wing anti-all-taxes forces.

So the citizens of Baton Rouge use their library system heavily, and they favor public support of the library. Unfortunately, the legislature is controlled by rural and small-town Louisiana, and it's the ignorant, Bible-thumper, non-reading rednecks in those areas who elected Jindal.

 
2012-06-30 09:42:53 AM

WhyteRaven74: [sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net image 492x411]


I like this one.
 
2012-06-30 11:32:06 AM
PlatinumDragon:

Incidentally, if you want a reason for maintaining paper copies of various works, imagine an extended power outage or shortage with no way to consistetly charge your e-reader or phone, or an incident that wipes out comm links and local data storage in one shot. All of a sudden, those dead-tree data storage media don't look quite so obsolete. Backups are necessary.

Actually, just imagine the publisher yanking the license for the e-books. Last I checked they really weren't sure how to deal with library lending. With paper books the presumption is that you sell a copy, it gets used, degrades, and is eventually weeded from the collection because of wear and tear. Then you sell another copy.

With digital you only sell one copy, ever (presumably), and they don't take up shelf space. Publishers are concerned this will eat into their bottom line, so they don't actually sell a copy of the book, they sell a license. And if the publisher goes out of business, or decides to yank that license, users and libraries might just be out of luck.

Same thing with databases rather than paper periodicals. Buy periodicals, even if you cancel your subscription you still have back issues for use. Buy a license, you don't renew that license and it all goes away.

Bottom line is digital is not as stable as a lot of people think it is.
 
2012-06-30 12:03:30 PM
"In a statement, the governor's chief budget aide, Paul Rainwater, said, "In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education. Operations such as local libraries can be supported with local, not state dollars.""


Look! There it is in black and white, he even admits it. Jindal supports healthcare and education.

RINO
 
2012-06-30 01:15:05 PM

coco ebert: StoneColdAtheist:


So I am not surprised that white southerners (the GOP-base) are now tearing down public institutions. They don't use them and they don't want to pay for them. They can't deny access to them by blacks and poor whites, so they just defund them, secure in their gated neighborhoods where they send their kids to all-white private schools, belong to all-white clubs, etc.

farking sad to hear.


To make matters even worse, this behavior is not limited to the South, not even close: take a trip to the suburbs of Milwaukee and you'll see places that are straight out of Aparthied-era South Africa. While I do see this occurring in places like Shreveport-Bossier City, I also see this going on in all corners of this nation
 
2012-06-30 01:40:59 PM

Goodfella: "In a statement, the governor's chief budget aide, Paul Rainwater, said, "In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education. Operations such as local libraries can be supported with local, not state dollars.""


Look! There it is in black and white, he even admits it. Jindal supports healthcare and education.

RINO



Also known as the first things in line to get cut whenever funding falls short. It's in the state's constitution.
 
2012-06-30 02:58:49 PM

PlatinumDragon: Rent Party: platedlizard: Gyrfalcon: platedlizard: BTW, that volcano monitoring thing still sends me into a rage. Mt. St. Helens erupted only 32 years ago, have people really forgotten that quickly?

/living wild on the Ring of Fire

Oh, that was a LONG TIME AGO, plus it was a random chance, plus there aren't any other active volcanoes in America, plus the next volcano due to blow is Mammoth, and I want to see that happen, so don't blow it for me.

Shush you, I wanna see Mt. Rainier go.

My wife is absolutely terrified of that thing. She calls it "The Volcano" rather than Mr. Rainier.

We just added earthquake insurance to the house, as I'm terrified of the Cascadia subduction zone, which doesn't get the kind of press it should.

I read a great book on the Cascadia subduction zone recently, borrowed from the Toronto library.

That's one thing I could live without seeing play out. The Indian Ocean and Japan were bad enough.

Incidentally, if you want a reason for maintaining paper copies of various works, imagine an extended power outage or shortage with no way to consistetly charge your e-reader or phone, or an incident that wipes out comm links and local data storage in one shot. All of a sudden, those dead-tree data storage media don't look quite so obsolete. Backups are necessary.


What was the book?

As far as "why books?" it's because I love them, and I love the culture surrounding them. I come from a family of readers, and pretty much everyone but me has migrated to an eReader of some sort, including my children. I still prefer dead trees, and the stores that sell them.

Logical reasons for having them around aren't necessary. :)
 
2012-07-01 12:53:43 AM

PlatinumDragon: It's so odd to read these "libraries are dead, digital is the eternal future" while reading A Canticle for Leibowitz.

It can all come to a crashing halt in a very short period of time. We should be careful.


In the event of a massive systemic collapse, there would very likely be a decades-spanning gap in our history, and a great deal of the scientific and medical knowledge we've gathered over the past half-century so could wind up going missing forever, because of our drive to leave behind print and archive information through strictly digital means.

Libraries and print books aren't luxuries, they're necessities. They serve as backups for when the power doesn't flow and the computers are inoperable. Defunding and crippling libraries isn't just irresponsible and short-sighted, it's actually dangerous.
 
2012-07-01 12:52:24 PM

deaccessioned: PlatinumDragon:

Incidentally, if you want a reason for maintaining paper copies of various works, imagine an extended power outage or shortage with no way to consistetly charge your e-reader or phone, or an incident that wipes out comm links and local data storage in one shot. All of a sudden, those dead-tree data storage media don't look quite so obsolete. Backups are necessary.

Actually, just imagine the publisher yanking the license for the e-books. Last I checked they really weren't sure how to deal with library lending. With paper books the presumption is that you sell a copy, it gets used, degrades, and is eventually weeded from the collection because of wear and tear. Then you sell another copy.

With digital you only sell one copy, ever (presumably), and they don't take up shelf space. Publishers are concerned this will eat into their bottom line, so they don't actually sell a copy of the book, they sell a license. And if the publisher goes out of business, or decides to yank that license, users and libraries might just be out of luck.

Same thing with databases rather than paper periodicals. Buy periodicals, even if you cancel your subscription you still have back issues for use. Buy a license, you don't renew that license and it all goes away.

Bottom line is digital is not as stable as a lot of people think it is.


Somewhere, Richard M. Stallman is muttering "I told you so" into his giant beard.
 
2012-07-01 01:05:16 PM

Rent Party: PlatinumDragon: Rent Party: platedlizard: Gyrfalcon: platedlizard: BTW, that volcano monitoring thing still sends me into a rage. Mt. St. Helens erupted only 32 years ago, have people really forgotten that quickly?

/living wild on the Ring of Fire

Oh, that was a LONG TIME AGO, plus it was a random chance, plus there aren't any other active volcanoes in America, plus the next volcano due to blow is Mammoth, and I want to see that happen, so don't blow it for me.

Shush you, I wanna see Mt. Rainier go.

My wife is absolutely terrified of that thing. She calls it "The Volcano" rather than Mr. Rainier.

We just added earthquake insurance to the house, as I'm terrified of the Cascadia subduction zone, which doesn't get the kind of press it should.

I read a great book on the Cascadia subduction zone recently, borrowed from the Toronto library.

That's one thing I could live without seeing play out. The Indian Ocean and Japan were bad enough.

Incidentally, if you want a reason for maintaining paper copies of various works, imagine an extended power outage or shortage with no way to consistetly charge your e-reader or phone, or an incident that wipes out comm links and local data storage in one shot. All of a sudden, those dead-tree data storage media don't look quite so obsolete. Backups are necessary.

What was the book?

As far as "why books?" it's because I love them, and I love the culture surrounding them. I come from a family of readers, and pretty much everyone but me has migrated to an eReader of some sort, including my children. I still prefer dead trees, and the stores that sell them.

Logical reasons for having them around aren't necessary. :)


The book is titled Cascadia's Fault. It was published late last year, and (assuming the information it contained is accurate) was a very compelling treatise on plate tectonics, how we've learned to determine what indications are left by past seismic events, what we've learned from contemporary events and ongoing research, and what it all portends for people living in the subduction zone along the North American Pacific coast.

A 9-banger affecting tens of millions of people heavily reliant upon distributed power generation and telecommunications will make printed information critically useful in the immediate aftermath while power plants are repaired and communication networks are reestablished. I don't need completely rational reasons to enjoy dead-tree media either, but the rush to store everything in electronic formats requres these arguments in favour of maintaining important information in other media to be expressed.
 
2012-07-01 01:09:33 PM

Smirky the Wonder Chimp: PlatinumDragon: It's so odd to read these "libraries are dead, digital is the eternal future" while reading A Canticle for Leibowitz.

It can all come to a crashing halt in a very short period of time. We should be careful.

In the event of a massive systemic collapse, there would very likely be a decades-spanning gap in our history, and a great deal of the scientific and medical knowledge we've gathered over the past half-century so could wind up going missing forever, because of our drive to leave behind print and archive information through strictly digital means.

Libraries and print books aren't luxuries, they're necessities. They serve as backups for when the power doesn't flow and the computers are inoperable. Defunding and crippling libraries isn't just irresponsible and short-sighted, it's actually dangerous.


Heck, digital information can become inaccessible if the necessary decoding machines and protocols aren't maintained in working condition. Didn't NASA nearly lose access to a pile of Apollo data for this reason, until they figured out a way to read the tapes and reverse-engineer the encoding method used?
 
2012-07-02 05:31:43 AM

PlatinumDragon: Heck, digital information can become inaccessible if the necessary decoding machines and protocols aren't maintained in working condition. Didn't NASA nearly lose access to a pile of Apollo data for this reason, until they figured out a way to read the tapes and reverse-engineer the encoding method used?



Yes...yes they did, as my moon-landing-denying friend never fails to remind me. "They misplaced HISTORY. Who misplaces HISTORY? The only explanation is the landings were FAKED!"

I tend to steer the conversation away from the space program for obvious reasons, since I can't seem to convince her that institutions can be as short-sighted and stupid as individuals.

/also she believes in the Anunanki and the 2012 nonsense.
//I know, I know, CSB.
 
2012-07-02 11:27:24 AM

Bill Murray said I was weird: beta_plus: Oh dear, now homeless people in Louisiana won't have anywhere to go to masturbate to kiddie porn. Why won't someone think of the homeless pedophiles?

Do you ever get tired of being a hatemongering asshole? It was bad enough when you cheered when rep Giffords got shot.


LOL WUT?

/though seeing you libs make fools of yourselves saying that her shooter was clearly a republican because his favorite book was the communist manifesto was hilarious
 
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