If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(LA Times)   Recalling his epic battle against government waste in the form of "something called volcano monitoring", Gov Jindal takes aim at another area of useless government bloat, and eliminates all funding for libraries in his state   (latimesblogs.latimes.com) divider line 241
    More: Sad, prediction of volcanic activity, computer skills, public libraries, library, mass transit, Bobby Jindal, refuses  
•       •       •

4160 clicks; posted to Politics » on 29 Jun 2012 at 4:53 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



241 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-06-29 08:45:55 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

It's not is just you, but that's only part of the story. The income disparity in North America is incredible. Being online insulates us from the daily life of the people with no computer access or literacy, and they really are common in urban areas.

Also, libraries serve all sorts of purposes as public space, such as air conditioned zones for people who can't afford it, and places for people to meet without paying for it. There is no online equivalent to a library - only archives. As for you: you must have the money to buy a coffee every time you want to meet a friend in person, and the expense of buying food or drink for your kids, in private spaces like restaurants.

It is a class difference that determines access to this stuff.


I think there's also an age difference for a lot of things as well. I had a patron in today who was in his late fifties but presented himself well. He was going to New York with his wife and trying to order Broadway tickets but needed an email address, which he didn't have. I helped him set it up despite his relative lack of computer skills (when trying to find his Gmail account he Googled his email address). I gave every appearance of being middle to upper-middle class, he just lives a life that, generally, doesn't need a computer which, in our modern society (and especially on Fark) people don't seem to realize is a possibility.
 
2012-06-29 08:48:17 PM  

Cinaed: Thats an 827: Stanford Ushers In The Age Of Bookless Libraries

The databases those students are using can cost tens of thousands of dollars, each.


I'm a grad student at Rutgers and the librarian there told me that by a large margin most of their budget goes to databases and other electronic data sources. They pay far less for physical books. I also read on PBS a recent report talking about public libraries dealing with the shift to ebooks. Many publishing companies are now looking to charge up to $100 for regular books and individuals are still required to wait until the ebook is "returned" to the library by whoever checked it out before them. Whoever thought switching to an electronic platform would be cheaper for libraries is sadly mistaken.
 
2012-06-29 08:48:35 PM  
Oops I replied to the wrong comment. I meant to reply to the question of where did Piyush get Bobby from.
 
2012-06-29 08:49:59 PM  

coco ebert: librarians with knowledge of technology.


Interesting, I've never met a librarian with knowledge of technology. They tend to, for some reason, be stuck completely in the dead tree media that they're surrounded with and were required to get masters degrees in a dead end major to even work there.
 
2012-06-29 08:53:52 PM  

coco ebert: Shaggy_C: Libraries are typically funded at the local level, hence why you are only allowed to get a library card if you live in the service area.

I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."

As the article states, the concern is for small parishes that have a poor population and thus a small tax base with which to fund such libraries. Ironically, libraries in poorer areas are often more important to the local population because they provide access to computers and librarians with knowledge of technology. Perhaps you didnt't read the article carefully enough?


To emphasize this point further, libraries in urban areas can generally rely on local taxes to maintain services, but libraries in rural areas are often far more reliant on state funding to state afloat. In Kansas, for example, most rural school and public libraries rely on a State of Kansas program (Kan-Ed) for their broadband service. Without subsidization from the state government, it would be far too expensive for them to receive such services otherwise. For those saying "everything is online", it's important to remember that not everybody has reasonably priced access to broadband services.
 
2012-06-29 08:55:11 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

It's not is just you, but that's only part of the story. The income disparity in North America is incredible. Being online insulates us from the daily life of the people with no computer access or literacy, and they really are common in urban areas.

Also, libraries serve all sorts of purposes as public space, such as air conditioned zones for people who can't afford it, and places for people to meet without paying for it. There is no online equivalent to a library - only archives. As for you: you must have the money to buy a coffee every time you want to meet a friend in person, and the expense of buying food or drink for your kids, in private spaces like restaurants.

It is a class difference that determines access to this stuff.


Yup. Make no mistake, these battles are not about money only. It's about a right-wing ideology that seeks to dismantle PUBLIC institutions that bring together people of all backgrounds and relies on a societal contract we make to support a variety of services and institutions that serve the greater good. They are often able to pull the wool over people's eyes because they do it institution by institution: education, health care, libraries, infrastructure, etc. They simply do not believe in these things. It's less to do with fiscal soundness and more to do with the fact that they don't believe in society, but rather a collection of individuals who bear no responsibility towards one another, only to him or herself. To me this is the single biggest problem in America today.
 
2012-06-29 08:55:21 PM  

Corvus: lockers: I go for books that I want to read since I pay for some small portion of them. Then again I read for pleasure and entertainment. Hell, in my library system I have ebooks, audio books (including mp3), videos and music. I have seen some systems that do video games. The main branch have research librarians who will give you selections for specific subjects, given certain criteria that may require more knowledge than google can provide. Not to mention access to scholarly articles where I have actually gone to where I could not find a free online resource for. I go anywhere from once a month to maybe four times. Not to mention the occasional kid oriented events they do. Libraries do so much more for a community than give you access to books that it isn't funny.

Almost ll libraries do that now. These "experts" who are going "hurrr hurr books are outdated we should get rid of libraries" are idiots who don't know what they are talking about. Surprise, surprise.

I know a librarian and she would tell me how swamped they were for computer usage. They had to run really stick limits for computer access because it would go all day with many people in line waiting.


There's also free air conditioning.

/and dvds, cds, books on tape, maker classes and physically present attractive people who read
 
2012-06-29 08:56:13 PM  

Endrick: coco ebert: librarians with knowledge of technology.

Interesting, I've never met a librarian with knowledge of technology. They tend to, for some reason, be stuck completely in the dead tree media that they're surrounded with and were required to get masters degrees in a dead end major to even work there.


i don't mean tech-savvy per se, but people who know how to set up an email account, search on the internet, etc.
 
2012-06-29 08:57:17 PM  
Georgia libraries also give you access to Galileo.
 
2012-06-29 08:57:45 PM  

rugman11: coco ebert: Shaggy_C: Libraries are typically funded at the local level, hence why you are only allowed to get a library card if you live in the service area.

I swear you people are like caricatures sometimes. Just because someone is against something being paid for at one level of government doesn't mean they're against it at all levels. Instead it's "hurr hurr Republicans hate reading."

As the article states, the concern is for small parishes that have a poor population and thus a small tax base with which to fund such libraries. Ironically, libraries in poorer areas are often more important to the local population because they provide access to computers and librarians with knowledge of technology. Perhaps you didnt't read the article carefully enough?

To emphasize this point further, libraries in urban areas can generally rely on local taxes to maintain services, but libraries in rural areas are often far more reliant on state funding to state afloat. In Kansas, for example, most rural school and public libraries rely on a State of Kansas program (Kan-Ed) for their broadband service. Without subsidization from the state government, it would be far too expensive for them to receive such services otherwise. For those saying "everything is online", it's important to remember that not everybody has reasonably priced access to broadband services.


Yup. That was what I meant to say but you said it far more eloquently than I did.
 
2012-06-29 08:58:11 PM  
Oh dear, now homeless people in Louisiana won't have anywhere to go to masturbate to kiddie porn. Why won't someone think of the homeless pedophiles?
 
2012-06-29 08:59:47 PM  
We're onto you, Piyush "Bobby" Lucius Domitius Aurelianus Augustus Jindal!
 
2012-06-29 09:01:40 PM  

mmagdalene: StoneColdAtheist: mmagdalene: Bobby Jindal = GOP house Negro

I thought that post was held by Allen West.

Strictly yard Negro.


Ha! just thought I'd add a bit of this history to the conversation: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=znQe9nUKzvQ

/dunno how to link with ipad
 
2012-06-29 09:02:47 PM  
Add me to the list of library defenders. Those of you who live in affluent suburbs may believe that libraries are desolate, empty places or glorified play-centers for the spawn of soccer moms, but for a large number of citizens they are the only place to access the technology resources and knowledge you probably take for granted.

I've been involved in the "community technology center" movement for over a decade and today our centers (located in libraries for the most part) are busier than they ever have been. In many ways, increased access generally has made the "digital divide" even sharper because non-participation is simply no longer an option.

People show up early to get their name on the waiting list to get a computer. And almost everyone there is trying to access some necessary resource, like applying for jobs or reporting said job applications for Unemployment.

Seriously, anyone who says "why do we need libraries if we have the Internet" is living in blissful ignorance.
 
2012-06-29 09:03:48 PM  

coco ebert: Cinaed: Thats an 827: Stanford Ushers In The Age Of Bookless Libraries

The databases those students are using can cost tens of thousands of dollars, each.

I'm a grad student at Rutgers and the librarian there told me that by a large margin most of their budget goes to databases and other electronic data sources. They pay far less for physical books. I also read on PBS a recent report talking about public libraries dealing with the shift to ebooks. Many publishing companies are now looking to charge up to $100 for regular books and individuals are still required to wait until the ebook is "returned" to the library by whoever checked it out before them. Whoever thought switching to an electronic platform would be cheaper for libraries is sadly mistaken.


As a former academic librarian, I can confirm all of this. We spent four times as much on our electronic databases as our books. Our subscription to the American Chemical Society's journals ran $25,000/yr for about 40 journals. And that's for a school of roughly 5,000 full-time students (most subscriptions are based on the number of students). Business Source Premier ran us $15,000/yr. The state of Kansas is about to pay half a million dollars per year for access to EBSCO's databases for all of its schools, colleges, and public libraries.

In terms of books, no publisher has been willing to change the lending model. The library that I'm currently at has access to Overdrive, but you "check out" books just as you would with a print copy, meaning when one person downloads it, nobody else gets it for two weeks. Also, publishers are starting to embargo their books, preventing libraries from lending them for months. Plus, the copies we purchase for lending expire after a year or so. The library e-book model is being held back by the publishers, not the librarians.
 
2012-06-29 09:04:12 PM  
Brilliant strategy there...
 
2012-06-29 09:08:00 PM  

Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.


Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.
 
2012-06-29 09:09:57 PM  

Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.


Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?
 
2012-06-29 09:12:37 PM  

cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?


Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding is moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.
 
2012-06-29 09:15:55 PM  

Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding is moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.


War on LibrariesTM
 
2012-06-29 09:17:00 PM  

Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding burdenis moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.


FTFY.

And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?
 
2012-06-29 09:17:18 PM  

rugman11: coco ebert: Cinaed: Thats an 827: Stanford Ushers In The Age Of Bookless Libraries

The databases those students are using can cost tens of thousands of dollars, each.

I'm a grad student at Rutgers and the librarian there told me that by a large margin most of their budget goes to databases and other electronic data sources. They pay far less for physical books. I also read on PBS a recent report talking about public libraries dealing with the shift to ebooks. Many publishing companies are now looking to charge up to $100 for regular books and individuals are still required to wait until the ebook is "returned" to the library by whoever checked it out before them. Whoever thought switching to an electronic platform would be cheaper for libraries is sadly mistaken.

As a former academic librarian, I can confirm all of this. We spent four times as much on our electronic databases as our books. Our subscription to the American Chemical Society's journals ran $25,000/yr for about 40 journals. And that's for a school of roughly 5,000 full-time students (most subscriptions are based on the number of students). Business Source Premier ran us $15,000/yr. The state of Kansas is about to pay half a million dollars per year for access to EBSCO's databases for all of its schools, colleges, and public libraries.

In terms of books, no publisher has been willing to change the lending model. The library that I'm currently at has access to Overdrive, but you "check out" books just as you would with a print copy, meaning when one person downloads it, nobody else gets it for two weeks. Also, publishers are starting to embargo their books, preventing libraries from lending them for months. Plus, the copies we purchase for lending expire after a year or so. The library e-book model is being held back by the publishers, not the librarians.


Interesting. Among academics there is also a growing backlash against the exorbitant fees charged by publishing companies of academic journals. Particularly when so much of research is funded by public moneys, the argument is that much of those findings should be open access to the public. Somewhat of a different topic, but interesting nonetheless: http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120424/03471718625/even-harvard-can t-afford-subscriptions-to-academic-journals-pushes-open-access.shtml
 
2012-06-29 09:20:00 PM  

rugman11: Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding burdenis moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.

FTFY.

And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?


If they want the program they will pay for it. They will cut something else or they will raise revenue. It's not complicated, it's what they are elected or appointed to do. If they do something stupid like shut down the library or let it fall into disrepair, they will be out of a job (particularly in the rural county mentioned).

I don't know why you need this explained! Do schools not teach civics anymore? This is how government works. Some programs work better at local, some at state, some at federal. These questions are simple and you could answer them yourself if you thought before replying.
 
2012-06-29 09:26:06 PM  

rugman11: Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding burdenis moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.

FTFY.

And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?


They charge for library cards? Raise late fees? Funding drives? Liberrians are supposed to be smart. They'll think of a way to keep the doors open for porn surfers.
 
2012-06-29 09:35:49 PM  

Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.


My response was directed toward the multitude of people in this very thread and elsewhere who are suggesting that libraries are simply no longer needed, period. These same people try to eliminate local funding as well.

So yes, there are people attacking libraries, and those of us who care about them are trying to protect funding at any level where we receive it.
 
2012-06-29 09:37:25 PM  

Cromar: rugman11: Cromar: cameroncrazy1984: Cromar: Polyhazard: Add me to the list of library defenders.

Calling yourself a library defenders implies there are people attacking libraries. This isn't Pawnee.

Defunding isn't attacking? In what respect, Charlie?

Jesus christ, you farking people have no concept of division of government. It's all one centralized monolithic organization to you, isn't it?

The funding burdenis moved to local level, where it should be. Done, let's move on.

FTFY.

And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?

If they want the program they will pay for it. They will cut something else or they will raise revenue. It's not complicated, it's what they are elected or appointed to do. If they do something stupid like shut down the library or let it fall into disrepair, they will be out of a job (particularly in the rural county mentioned).

I don't know why you need this explained! Do schools not teach civics anymore? This is how government works. Some programs work better at local, some at state, some at federal. These questions are simple and you could answer them yourself if you thought before replying.


And in a state with a disparate mix of rural and urban population, education initiatives often work better at the state level because it allows both urban and rural areas to provide equal access to essential services.

Because God forbid the people of Louisiana pay an extra $.20 per person to ensure that the people of East Carroll Parish (per capita income of $9,629) have roughly equal access to information as the people of St. Tammany Parish (per capita income of $22,514).
 
2012-06-29 09:37:47 PM  
A Louisianan shows up at Harvard to study. He asks a lady, "Excuse me, where is the library at?"

Shocked, she replies, "Don't you know anything? Never end a sentence with a preposition!"

The Louisianan pauses for a moment and then says, "Okay... where is the library at, biatch?"
 
2012-06-29 09:41:49 PM  
www.biography.com

Spinning in his grave
 
2012-06-29 09:43:18 PM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: Muta: Speaking of Jindal and waste ...

[wonkroom.thinkprogress.org image 512x384]

Indeed. If Louisiana has no libraries, what will Jindal throw into the ocean the next time the coast is threatened?


I don't remember this story, possibly because I usually don't pay much attention to Jindal. Care to re-enlighten?
 
2012-06-29 09:49:38 PM  
Your libraries are being threatened with closure? These people came up with a solution that worked. Of course Michigan is not Louisiana.
 
2012-06-29 09:50:13 PM  

rugman11: And what happens when the local governments can't meet that funding burden?


That's thinking things through. Republicans are against that.
 
2012-06-29 09:51:06 PM  

lilbjorn: [www.biography.com image 402x402]

Spinning in his grave


probably just saying "Boooooooooooo.... charge them to borrow books.... Boooooooooooooo."
 
2012-06-29 09:51:36 PM  

vernonFL: Our college library had a guy who everyone called 'the mystery masturbator', and he was never identified or caught.

Several students saw him jacking it in the library on numerous occasions.


I saw so many penii in the public library when I was in high school that it made up for the fact that they wouldn't teach sex ed.
 
2012-06-29 09:52:06 PM  

PsiChick: Corvus: Skywolf Philosopher: Corvus: DeltaPunch: Part of me thinks at some point down the road this will be inevitable. We're doing everything online now*, books, teaching, etc. But the only excuse for not funding libraries is that you've implemented hi-tech computer centers throughout the state for learning, reading e-books, etc. I hardly think Louisiana is that far along, and is actually just doing this because of failed conservative politics.

*Or is that just me? *ahem*

They have. They call them"Libraries".

They have computers and e-books you can down load on line. At least in my state they do.

I live in Arkansas and my library has a great wireless network and laptops and kindles that can be borrowed.

I am not surprised. Most people on FARK when they talk about libraries seem like they haven't stepped inside one for the last 20 years.

Actually, libraries are still important--paper-and-ink books have a lot of main advantages. For example, on days when I'm more likely to have a migraine, I can read a book instead of going on Fark. It's less likely to end painfully. Also, I can read without any electricity.

/Love libraries
//Don't check anything out because I'm too sporadic to return them, but still love 'em
///And try getting a copy of the Hunger Games from a library after the movie came out...


I did. Took three weeks for the reservation to come in. I love my local library, and I usually visit it one every couple weeks. If they don't have the book, I reserve it online, then fetch it when available. Plus, the reference librarians are great and have access to resources that surpass Google in some cases, and give me requested information in a reasonable amount of time.
 
2012-06-29 09:57:08 PM  
I use the local branch of the Somerville library all the time. The glorious Minuteman Library Network means I can go on-line, pick a book from a pretty far-ranging list, and within a week it's been delivered from within a 30-mile radius. Because it's a huge pooling of hundreds of regional libraries, they can keep obscure titles in-stock and there will always be some kind of demand, which means that those books aren't retired.

The funny thing, I'm a pretty technical guy, but I don't much care for e-books. I still like dead tree books.
 
2012-06-29 10:00:23 PM  
Yeah, history never repeats itself.

Peasant-ize the population enough just so you can be a little richer. Your descendants will never go the way of Marie Antoinette.
 
2012-06-29 10:04:05 PM  

Egalitarian: Yeah, history never repeats itself.

Peasant-ize the population enough just so you can be a little richer. Your descendants will never go the way of Marie Antoinette.


*rolleyes*
 
2012-06-29 10:12:26 PM  

Scythed: Libraries need a new business model. They should really just be small-scale free internet cafes with community center-style events.


Libraries and governments are NOT BUISNESSES. They should not operate under the same assumptions and rules.
 
2012-06-29 10:14:46 PM  

Cromar: If they want the program they will pay for it.


Oh, I see. If they want libraries, they should gut a bunch of other programs, rather than, oh, I don't know, asking an organization that has a sh*t ton more money than they do to help them.
 
2012-06-29 10:30:17 PM  

mmagdalene: StoneColdAtheist: mmagdalene: Bobby Jindal = GOP house Negro

I thought that post was held by Allen West.

Strictly yard Negro.


Jindal is the "Lascar" of the GOP. (i.e. Indian man-servant)
 
2012-06-29 10:33:51 PM  

coco ebert: Bennie Crabtree: It is a class difference that determines access to this stuff.

Yup. Make no mistake, these battles are not about money only. It's about a right-wing ideology that seeks to dismantle PUBLIC institutions that bring together people of all backgrounds and relies on a societal contract we make to support a variety of services and institutions that serve the greater good. They are often able to pull the wool over people's eyes because they do it institution by institution: education, health care, libraries, infrastructure, etc. They simply do not believe in these things. It's less to do with fiscal soundness and more to do with the fact that they don't believe in society, but rather a collection of individuals who bear no responsibility towards one another, only to him or herself. To me this is the single biggest problem in America today.


I saw this first hand while stationed at Barksdale AFB in Shreveport, LA. White gentile locals would NOT rub elbows with blacks, much less permit their children to go to school with them; live next door to them, or include them in their social lives. I sensed they were deeply offended by developments in America since the Civil Rights era. As if the country had turned its back on their God-given right to have a privileged place. And I'm not talking about experiencing this in the abstract. I saw it with my own eyes and heard it directly from their lips.

So I am not surprised that white southerners (the GOP-base) are now tearing down public institutions. They don't use them and they don't want to pay for them. They can't deny access to them by blacks and poor whites, so they just defund them, secure in their gated neighborhoods where they send their kids to all-white private schools, belong to all-white clubs, etc.
 
2012-06-29 10:40:07 PM  
We've got to get our unskilled laborers to work in the salt mines from somewhere...
 
2012-06-29 10:44:30 PM  

The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: We've got to get our unskilled laborers to work in the salt mines from somewhere...


we already get them from the places that would be adversely effected by $900k less statewide and they currently DO have that $16k in state library funding
 
2012-06-29 10:49:02 PM  
FTFA: In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Actually, no. Jindal's full of sh*t with that one. He's actually bragged that he hasn't put any funding into the state's health care system, and swears to resist allowing ANY part of the Affordable Healthcare Act into LA, even after it was declare 100% Constitutional.
 
2012-06-29 10:49:54 PM  
Well, the average John Q republican on the street isn't a big reader.
 
2012-06-29 10:55:55 PM  

StoneColdAtheist: coco ebert: Bennie Crabtree: It is a class difference that determines access to this stuff.

Yup. Make no mistake, these battles are not about money only. It's about a right-wing ideology that seeks to dismantle PUBLIC institutions that bring together people of all backgrounds and relies on a societal contract we make to support a variety of services and institutions that serve the greater good. They are often able to pull the wool over people's eyes because they do it institution by institution: education, health care, libraries, infrastructure, etc. They simply do not believe in these things. It's less to do with fiscal soundness and more to do with the fact that they don't believe in society, but rather a collection of individuals who bear no responsibility towards one another, only to him or herself. To me this is the single biggest problem in America today.

I saw this first hand while stationed at Barksdale AFB in Shreveport, LA. White gentile locals would NOT rub elbows with blacks, much less permit their children to go to school with them; live next door to them, or include them in their social lives. I sensed they were deeply offended by developments in America since the Civil Rights era. As if the country had turned its back on their God-given right to have a privileged place. And I'm not talking about experiencing this in the abstract. I saw it with my own eyes and heard it directly from their lips.

So I am not surprised that white southerners (the GOP-base) are now tearing down public institutions. They don't use them and they don't want to pay for them. They can't deny access to them by blacks and poor whites, so they just defund them, secure in their gated neighborhoods where they send their kids to all-white private schools, belong to all-white clubs, etc.


farking sad to hear.
 
2012-06-29 11:00:11 PM  

TheBigJerk: I don't remember this story, possibly because I usually don't pay much attention to Jindal. Care to re-enlighten?


BP oil spill. Jindal wanted to re-enforce the sand berms just beyond the coast to protect the LA coastline. Scientists and federal agencies warned him it was a colossal waste of time and money, during a national emergency no less, but Jindal was all about parading in front of the cameras and declaring that he alone was willing to do what needed to be done to save the state.

A detailed report came out later that highlighted Jindal's berms as the giant waste that everybody said they would be, and large amounts of equipment were lost as the berms eroded (again, exactly as he was warned they would be) and carried the construction equipment off with them. Hence the photo.
 
2012-06-29 11:01:59 PM  

StoneColdAtheist: I saw this first hand while stationed at Barksdale AFB in Shreveport, LA. White gentile locals would NOT rub elbows with blacks, much less permit their children to go to school with them; live next door to them, or include them in their social lives. I sensed they were deeply offended by developments in America since the Civil Rights era. As if the country had turned its back on their God-given right to have a privileged place. And I'm not talking about experiencing this in the abstract. I saw it with my own eyes and heard it directly from their lips.

So I am not surprised that white southerners (the GOP-base) are now tearing down public institutions. They don't use them and they don't want to pay for them. They can't deny access to them by blacks and poor whites, so they just defund them, secure in their gated neighborhoods where they send their kids to all-white private schools, belong to all-white clubs, etc.


They've been offended by this since the Reconstruction, actually.
 
2012-06-29 11:04:59 PM  

TV's Vinnie: FTFA: In tight budget times, we prioritized funding for healthcare and education.

Actually, no. Jindal's full of sh*t with that one. He's actually bragged that he hasn't put any funding into the state's health care system, and swears to resist allowing ANY part of the Affordable Healthcare Act into LA, even after it was declare 100% Constitutional.


It'll be ok, there's a provision for the federal government to roll in and set up an exchange should a state fail to do so... the good people of Louisiana will extend what is widely considered to be basic humane treatment to all the residents of the state, even if it is over their passionate and adamant objections.
 
2012-06-29 11:21:41 PM  

beta_plus: Oh dear, now homeless people in Louisiana won't have anywhere to go to masturbate to kiddie porn. Why won't someone think of the homeless pedophiles?


Do you ever get tired of being a hatemongering asshole? It was bad enough when you cheered when rep Giffords got shot.
 
Displayed 50 of 241 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report