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(Cracked)   The 5 most ridiculous pop culture predictions that came true (even though we're still waiting on those damn flying cars)   (cracked.com) divider line 65
    More: Interesting, Apple products, predictions, product lines, O.J. Simpson, Chris Rock, cultures, iPhone 4S, Moammar Gadhafi  
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27840 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Jun 2012 at 12:06 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-29 11:38:49 AM
Having the Apple "Knowledge Navigator" linked there makes the whole article worth it.

/5th anniv of the iPhone and all
 
2012-06-29 12:08:55 PM
Thanks, subby.

I had never seen (or heard of) the Knowledge Navigator before. That is an amazing bit of forecasting, especially the commentary about the date of Siri being a few weeks after this video supposedly took place.

Or to put it another way, Apple was late with the 4s by a couple months
 
2012-06-29 12:09:52 PM
No. No flying cars, subby. Most people are uncoordinated, thought-free morons driving in two dimensions; I do not want to see the chaos if a third dimension is added.
 
2012-06-29 12:16:05 PM
Bah. Try 1968.
These guys actually invented all these concepts way before...
Or youtube "mother of all demos". Doug didn't just draw pictures, he actually built it.
 
2012-06-29 12:16:16 PM
A broken clock is right twice a day (excecpt in places that don't mess around with AM and PM). With that said, the huge video screen in Marty McFly's 2015 house now looks like a pretty typical flat screen display.

/Waiting for the paper thin computers in Caprica
//But not the transparent video screens from Being Erica
 
2012-06-29 12:17:08 PM
we live in the future and people are still upset our cars don't fly. FFS.

everything is amazing and nobody is happy.


/IT'S GOING TO SPACE! GIVE IT A SECOND!
 
2012-06-29 12:17:49 PM
left off the list was the prediction that "individuals will sit at a desk and get paid to do absolutely nothing but look at a website called fark"
 
2012-06-29 12:19:46 PM
rlv.zcache.ca
 
2012-06-29 12:20:12 PM
unimpressed.

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-06-29 12:21:28 PM

trivial use of my dark powers: No. No flying cars, subby. Most people are uncoordinated, thought-free morons driving in two dimensions; I do not want to see the chaos if a third dimension is added.


Exactly! Maybe that's the reason we need to wait, so the eventual on-board A.I. can be made smart enough to really do the flying for us.
 
2012-06-29 12:22:43 PM
Felicity predicts the iPad back in '99
 
2012-06-29 12:23:47 PM

Optimal_Illusion: trivial use of my dark powers: No. No flying cars, subby. Most people are uncoordinated, thought-free morons driving in two dimensions; I do not want to see the chaos if a third dimension is added.

Exactly! Maybe that's the reason we need to wait, so the eventual on-board A.I. can be made smart enough to really do the flying for us.


Oh, those light flyers will have so many safety devices you 'd have to be an epileptic and actively seizing teratogenicly mutated midget to crash one.
 
2012-06-29 12:31:09 PM

Optimal_Illusion: trivial use of my dark powers: No. No flying cars, subby. Most people are uncoordinated, thought-free morons driving in two dimensions; I do not want to see the chaos if a third dimension is added.

Exactly! Maybe that's the reason we need to wait, so the eventual on-board A.I. can be made smart enough to really do the flying for us.


I'd rather have a self-driving car over a flying car. I could read during my commute instead of staring at bumpers.
 
2012-06-29 12:40:04 PM
I was always impressed the prescience of the flat-screen setup shown in the 1966 movie version of "Fahrenheit 451"

www.fearthepenguin.net
 
2012-06-29 12:43:36 PM

LaraAmber: Optimal_Illusion: trivial use of my dark powers: No. No flying cars, subby. Most people are uncoordinated, thought-free morons driving in two dimensions; I do not want to see the chaos if a third dimension is added.

Exactly! Maybe that's the reason we need to wait, so the eventual on-board A.I. can be made smart enough to really do the flying for us.

I'd rather have a self-driving car over a flying car. I could read during my commute instead of staring at bumpers.


Got 'em. Sort of. Driverless Car
 
2012-06-29 12:48:42 PM
The prediction that always gets me is Rowan & Martin's Laugh In prediction that Ronald Reagan would be President. He was just feeling his way towards a run for Governor of California at the time, so such an apocalyptic future was not unthinkable but it was far from a done deal.

Predicting future developments is not all that difficult--you're bound to get some of them right, but it's hazardous to simply project current trends, so prognosticators and futurists are always embarassing themselves.

Even SF writers, who are so to speak, professional anticipators, often fail to see what technologies will disappear in the near future, which makes for an odd mish-mash of the still futuristic (like androids) and the archaic (like carbon paper).

Hence we have many SF stories where people are still using typewriters, computers still consist of massive rooms full of vacuum tubes, and there's nary a microchip in sight.

On the other hand, there's many old technologies that did all sorts of "modern" things far earlier than we think.

The fax machine, for example, is both embarassingly obsolete and something that was in use in the mid-nineteenth century, as were various forms of photocopier. Not very common, but this was before the telephone.

And the telephone was used to transmit news, music and other events well before the first computer was used by the International Business Machine Company to tabulate the US Census in less than ten years. Even speaking tubes and pneumatic tubes allowed communications that seem peculiarly modern and strangely steam punk at the same time. You see a lot of this stuff parodied on Futurama.

I am fascinated by old technology that solves problems we use something much more expensive and complicated to do today. Our ancestors were just as clever and smart as we are, if not more so, and they figured out solutions to problems we still face with out many technologies we have today. Materials and manufacturing made some of our technology impossible, but it didn't stop people from solving the problem with what they had to hand.

We could use a lot of old technology again today. It would save energy and money and the environment. Whatever happend to brown paper packages, tied up with string?
 
2012-06-29 12:49:25 PM
The internet didn't exist in 1987? I'd better wire DARPA.

/worked with dial-up database research in 1986, and from that could see future, full-color, high-speed digital downloads
//was in 8th grade, so this isn't hard
 
2012-06-29 12:53:42 PM
That was a pretty amusing article to read. One of the better ones. But I predict there will be better ones in the future.
 
2012-06-29 12:57:48 PM

Doubletwist-: I was always impressed the prescience of the flat-screen setup shown in the 1966 movie version of "Fahrenheit 451"

[www.fearthepenguin.net image 400x429]


If I recall from the book, the "Family" (the show that was always on) was basically just a bunch of people creating drama out of meaningless arguments- also remarkably prescient.
Oh yeah, and the "seashell" essentially a radio that fit in your ear like an earbud.
 
2012-06-29 12:58:02 PM
Oh my, the US nowadays has a train that can run 150 mph? Oh the technological advance is a true marvel. Still more than 50 years behind Japan in that regard, but I guess it's due to their socialism or some BS.
 
2012-06-29 01:02:05 PM

Doubletwist-: I was always impressed the prescience of the flat-screen setup shown in the 1966 movie version of "Fahrenheit 451"

[www.fearthepenguin.net image 400x429]


The book was even more prescient. Hell, this list is a whole bunch of 'meh'... Internet was "predicted" in the 30's when sci fi writers like Asimov had people looking up data, accessing news archives, ordering dinner, Hell ordering meals from a central kitchen even, all using a computer in their house/apartment/etc. Wifi? Yeah, people have also used wireless computers and phones in old scifi as well. Besides Nikola Tesla proposed text messaging, as in wireless text based communication between individuals, back in the 1890's.

The Apple thing was interesting, that and the Ghadaffi thing were the only cool parts of the list. The Chris Rock thing was like throwing a rock in a pond and hitting water.

And "Ridiculous"? What is "ridiculous" about these predictions? They weren't THAT farfetched, and they all fall in line with exactly where tech was headed.,.

/Not you subby, Cracked is who I have issues with on this one.
 
2012-06-29 01:03:23 PM
#2. Wi-Fi and Today's Internet Envisioned in 1982

images.wikia.com
Told ya!
 
2012-06-29 01:06:56 PM
I predicted in 2003 as a myspacer that people would do stupid shiat on social networks that would lead to very real serious non-virtual jail time. I envision new online crime fighting jobs to catch morons that pose with stolen guns/jewelry on Facebook. This didn't take long.
 
2012-06-29 01:07:56 PM
The book Golf in the Year 2000, written in 1892, predicted a few things like a form of television, mass-transit subways, powered golf carts, and digital watches.

ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2012-06-29 01:07:57 PM
Article starts strong but ends weakly.
 
2012-06-29 01:09:05 PM

brantgoose: The prediction that always gets me is Rowan & Martin's Laugh In prediction that Ronald Reagan would be President. He was just feeling his way towards a run for Governor of California at the time, so such an apocalyptic future was not unthinkable but it was far from a done deal.

Predicting future developments is not all that difficult--you're bound to get some of them right, but it's hazardous to simply project current trends, so prognosticators and futurists are always embarassing themselves.

Even SF writers, who are so to speak, professional anticipators, often fail to see what technologies will disappear in the near future, which makes for an odd mish-mash of the still futuristic (like androids) and the archaic (like carbon paper).

Hence we have many SF stories where people are still using typewriters, computers still consist of massive rooms full of vacuum tubes, and there's nary a microchip in sight.

On the other hand, there's many old technologies that did all sorts of "modern" things far earlier than we think.

The fax machine, for example, is both embarassingly obsolete and something that was in use in the mid-nineteenth century, as were various forms of photocopier. Not very common, but this was before the telephone.

And the telephone was used to transmit news, music and other events well before the first computer was used by the International Business Machine Company to tabulate the US Census in less than ten years. Even speaking tubes and pneumatic tubes allowed communications that seem peculiarly modern and strangely steam punk at the same time. You see a lot of this stuff parodied on Futurama.

I am fascinated by old technology that solves problems we use something much more expensive and complicated to do today. Our ancestors were just as clever and smart as we are, if not more so, and they figured out solutions to problems we still face with out many technologies we have today. Materials and manufacturing made some of our technology impossible, bu ...


tl;dr - get off my lawn
 
2012-06-29 01:10:36 PM

trivial use of my dark powers: No. No flying cars, subby. Most people are uncoordinated, thought-free morons driving in two dimensions; I do not want to see the chaos if a third dimension is added.


You know. I wouldn't be surprised if something similar was said about the "horseless carriage" when it was first introduced.
 
2012-06-29 01:11:17 PM

brantgoose: Whatever happend to brown paper packages, tied up with string?


*Wistful Sigh* They were a few of my favorite things.
 
2012-06-29 01:17:30 PM
I'm sure there a lot of people out there in FarkLand that are as old as I am (43). And if you you have read this far into this post, you probably were a bit of a nerd like me that had a computer as far back as like 1985 or earlier. My first machine was an IBM with 2 floppy drives, a cartridge slot, booted up in DOS off a floppy, and if you didn't know how to write in BASIC, you really couldn't do a lot other than play very simple games. We didn't even have a modem for like 2 years into having the machine. That was back when people ran bulletin board systems from their house. And it was quite a feat to make friends through those little messaging systems. And you could download games. You could literally watch the code scroll by as it came down.

A little later, my stepfather had one of the first generation Macs. The little black and white ones that were totally self-contained. Quite advanced for the time. I didn't really use that one too much. It was great for word processing and making little posters.
My buddy across the street had an Apple-IIe. I have to admit, that one was a slightly more capable machine than my IBM, but only slightly.

The first more advanced machine I got, [and was the one that I got my real first experience with more advanced programming (Pascal)], was an AT&T with an 8086 CPU and a black and green monitor. Only certain pieces of software were capable of drawing actual graphics. For the most part, it was almost entirely ASCII text best. At least it had a 20MB hard drive. The first one I'd ever owned.

The next machine I had was an ACER that I bought mail-order from JC Penny. This things was REALLY advanced. It cost me $1500, so it damned well better be! It had 2MB RAM, 100MB drive, 640x480 VGA, and ran Windows 3.1. It had no sound card, modem, game card, CD drive... Nuthin. Once I added those things in, it became a rather functional machine. I discovered the Usenet, and could actually transfer files and messages through a number of groups. Then when AOL came out, everything changed. It was still a couple of years before I found that it was unnecessary to use the AOL client to play around on the internet. Once Netscape got good and stable, I only used AOL to make my initial connection.

Needless to say, all the machines I use now (between work and home, I think I'm at 5 - not including my kid's machines, the XBox, our phones, or iPods), all have game ports, wireless (some also ethernet ports), sound cards, more RAM than you can shake a stick at, and more hard drive space than I will ever use, DVD burners, not a single floppy drive, and USB ports all over the place.

If you are not old enough to follow this story, l get off my lawn!!
 
2012-06-29 01:27:08 PM

lucksi: Still more than 50 years behind Japan in that regard, but I guess it's due to their socialism or some BS.


Building a train capable of traveling at 150 mph is easy.

Building a system of tracks where trains can achieve at that speed, without sharing rights-of-way with slower-moving trains, without creating dangerous or nuisance conditions for the people who live near them, and without costing billions of dollars that might never be earned back as revenue is not as easy.
 
2012-06-29 01:27:22 PM
The movie Network from 1976 predicted a world where TV news was focused on entertainment and ratings, rather than relating information.

The book Caesar's Column by Ignatius Donnelly, written in 1890, predicts several things occurring in 1988.

New York City having over 10 million people and being part of an urban area that stretches unbroken to Philadelphia.

Streetlights powered by magnetism

Shopping centers consisting of several stores under one roof

Subways and elevated monorails using electric motors

Airships traveling New York to London in 36 hours

Ability to predict hurricanes

People would forego dinner conversation to focus on eating

We would read menus and newspapers off of glass screens

We would eat any type of creature (what the hell is a nugget anyways?)

Food would be augmented with vitamins and minerals

Climate control by pumping down cold air through a 1000-foot pipe or bringing up hot water from great depths

Assisted suicide is legal

The book also predicted North America plunging into a catastrophic civil war that killed millions, so it did miss the mark on some points. Some of the other predictions came half-true (electric streetlights are common, but not magnetic light bulbs), and the airships one has come and gone.
 
2012-06-29 01:27:37 PM

brantgoose: The prediction that always gets me is Rowan & Martin's Laugh In prediction that Ronald Reagan would be President. He was just feeling his way towards a run for Governor of California at the time, so such an apocalyptic future was not unthinkable but it was far from a done deal.


Don't forget they predicted the Berlin Wall would fall in 1989. That is my favourite, by far.
 
2012-06-29 01:27:53 PM
Came here to say "fark flying cars, I've got Siri."

Within my lifetime it will be possible to say, "Google-Siri, please drive me to the nearest clean restroom."

Then the robots will kill us all. But at least I'll get to say that.
 
2012-06-29 01:33:26 PM
In the first season of Saturday Night Live, they did a fake commercial for a three blade razor.
 
2012-06-29 01:43:57 PM

brantgoose: The prediction that always gets me is Rowan & Martin's Laugh In prediction that Ronald Reagan would be President. He was just feeling his way towards a run for Governor of California at the time, so such an apocalyptic future was not unthinkable but it was far from a done deal.


Reagan was the governor of CA when Laugh-In began airing.
 
2012-06-29 01:51:31 PM
We were promised jetpacks.
 
2012-06-29 01:55:47 PM

busy chillin': we live in the future and people are still upset our cars don't fly. FFS.

everything is amazing and nobody is happy.


/IT'S GOING TO SPACE! GIVE IT A SECOND!


I hate Verizon.
 
2012-06-29 02:11:19 PM

Mikey1969: Hell, this list is a whole bunch of 'meh'... Internet was "predicted" in the 30's when sci fi writers like Asimov had people looking up data, accessing news archives, ordering dinner, Hell ordering meals from a central kitchen even, all using a computer in their house/apartment/etc.


Check out Murray Leinster's short story "A Logic Named Joe"; written in 1946, it came eerily close to describing the modern Internet.
 
2012-06-29 02:12:47 PM

Doubletwist-: I was always impressed the prescience of the flat-screen setup shown in the 1966 movie version of "Fahrenheit 451"

[www.fearthepenguin.net image 400x429]


Yes, but no TV Guide!
 
2012-06-29 02:34:19 PM
What about all of the predictions that people made that didn't come true?

// with all of the future looking stuff that is created, some of it is going to be close, if not spot on. Then they get held up as amazing predictions, ignoring the hundreds (if not thousands) of predictions that fell flat on their faces.
 
2012-06-29 02:38:52 PM
The Ladies Home Journal article was actually kinda fun to read.

They loved themselves some pneumatic tubes.
 
2012-06-29 02:51:58 PM

geoduck42: Mikey1969: Hell, this list is a whole bunch of 'meh'... Internet was "predicted" in the 30's when sci fi writers like Asimov had people looking up data, accessing news archives, ordering dinner, Hell ordering meals from a central kitchen even, all using a computer in their house/apartment/etc.

Check out Murray Leinster's short story "A Logic Named Joe"; written in 1946, it came eerily close to describing the modern Internet.


I'll look for that one. Thanks for the heads up. Love me some old school SciFI.

You know what NOBODY predicted? Something I haven't come across is video games. Sure, occasionally you had a story with a computer that played chess, but that was pretty much it. Nothing mentioned video games as we know them, first person shooters, RPGs, sports games, even the text based stuff was never even hinted at. Of course, computers were seen as serious tools at the time, and may of the people have the computer being used on a time sharing program, but I've always found it interesting that nobody ever seems to have though of video games.
 
2012-06-29 02:57:21 PM

Uchiha_Cycliste: Optimal_Illusion: trivial use of my dark powers: No. No flying cars, subby. Most people are uncoordinated, thought-free morons driving in two dimensions; I do not want to see the chaos if a third dimension is added.

Exactly! Maybe that's the reason we need to wait, so the eventual on-board A.I. can be made smart enough to really do the flying for us.

Oh, those light flyers will have so many safety devices you 'd have to be an epileptic and actively seizing teratogenicly mutated midget to crash one.


I request and require that your posts show up in green 3 henceforth.
 
2012-06-29 03:00:41 PM
There's an interesting theory going around that the reason why we don't have flying cars by now is that the Rolls Royce Marty hits was carrying the guy that was supposed to have been inspired to turn his life around from being an idle drunkard and invented all these amazing gadgets like portable fusion generators and flying cars. But since Marty didn't hit the Rolls Royce, the guy continues his life of idle wealth and doesn't do anything else.

So thanks, Marty! Deny us a great future because you wanted to fix your life or some crap like that.
 
2012-06-29 03:25:10 PM

White Rose Duelist: Uchiha_Cycliste: Optimal_Illusion: trivial use of my dark powers: No. No flying cars, subby. Most people are uncoordinated, thought-free morons driving in two dimensions; I do not want to see the chaos if a third dimension is added.

Exactly! Maybe that's the reason we need to wait, so the eventual on-board A.I. can be made smart enough to really do the flying for us.

Oh, those light flyers will have so many safety devices you 'd have to be an epileptic and actively seizing teratogenicly mutated midget to crash one.

I request and require that your posts show up in green 3 henceforth.


right away.

*half assed analysts salute*
 
2012-06-29 04:03:34 PM
You know why we don't have long lists of future predictions these days? The singularity, that is why. The future is increasingly unpredictable.
 
2012-06-29 04:21:53 PM

Lorelle: brantgoose: The prediction that always gets me is Rowan & Martin's Laugh In prediction that Ronald Reagan would be President. He was just feeling his way towards a run for Governor of California at the time, so such an apocalyptic future was not unthinkable but it was far from a done deal.

Reagan was the governor of CA when Laugh-In began airing.


I remember hearing the Reagan bit one evening while watching Laugh In on TVLand (or whatever channel it was on).

Here's the clip for Reagan, and the Berlin Wall too.
 
2012-06-29 04:23:12 PM
Meant to add: and nearly fell out of my chair, because it was the early 90s already.
 
2012-06-29 04:35:16 PM

Lydia_C: I remember hearing the Reagan bit one evening while watching Laugh In on TVLand (or whatever channel it was on).

Here's the clip for Reagan, and the Berlin Wall too.


Thanks. Mad Magazine unintentionally made a similar prediction (well, kinda sorta) in 1970:

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-06-29 04:52:36 PM
The ladies home journal one had its own fark thread about a year ago IIRC
 
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