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(Science Daily)   Vintage tomato insist in being called tomatoe   (sciencedaily.com) divider line 40
    More: Strange, Solanum lycopersicum, transcription factors, heirloom tomato, the university, Vietnam, chloroplasts, Ars, molecular biology  
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2381 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Jun 2012 at 5:23 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-29 01:47:50 AM  
Only by Dan Quayl
 
2012-06-29 05:07:58 AM  
Catsup?
 
2012-06-29 05:39:45 AM  
love apple 2.0
 
2012-06-29 05:40:04 AM  
Two unintentional typos in a headline making fun of a man for a spelling error.

What delicious ironing.
 
2012-06-29 05:59:09 AM  
They still have to be tough to hold up under mechanical processing, and as long as they pick them green to ship long distances they will taste like shiat.

You can polish a turd, but in the end it's still a turd.
 
2012-06-29 07:30:01 AM  

AMonkey'sUncle: They still have to be tough to hold up under mechanical processing, and as long as they pick them green to ship long distances they will taste like shiat.

You can polish a turd, but in the end it's still a turd.



Yeah, I only eat the ones I grow, got about 6 weeks to wait.............
 
2012-06-29 08:05:11 AM  

AMonkey'sUncle: They still have to be tough to hold up under mechanical processing, and as long as they pick them green to ship long distances they will taste like shiat.

You can polish a turd, but in the end it's still a turd.


Pretty much this. I buy tomatoes from the Amish at my local farmer's market, and they're tasty as hell. I really should grow my own, but I'm lazy.

/tomato and fresh mozzarella sandwich for lunch today!
 
2012-06-29 08:39:00 AM  

Dwight_Yeast: /tomato and fresh mozzarella sandwich for lunch today!


Include fresh sweet basil leaves and a few drops of olive oil for an added dose of heaven.
 
2012-06-29 08:45:55 AM  

whyRpeoplesostupid: Yeah, I only eat the ones I grow, got about 6 weeks to wait...........


and only heirlooms

a4dibbleplants.co.nz

//purple cherokee ftw
 
2012-06-29 08:48:15 AM  
"Don't start that business up again!"
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-06-29 09:15:10 AM  
"StoneColdAtheist
Dwight_Yeast: /tomato and fresh mozzarella sandwich for lunch today!

Include fresh sweet basil leaves and a few drops of olive oil for an added dose of heaven."

Well this topic just took a turn into the gay zone.
 
2012-06-29 10:01:38 AM  

cretinbob: whyRpeoplesostupid: Yeah, I only eat the ones I grow, got about 6 weeks to wait...........

and only heirlooms



//purple cherokee ftw


I've got those, Brandywines, Moonglows, Mortgage Lifters, and black krim.
 
2012-06-29 10:04:30 AM  
First year growing. Just BIG BOYs.

Going heirloom next year.

What are good varieties, for both yield, taste & time (early vs. late harvest)
 
2012-06-29 10:05:16 AM  
All ripe tomatoes, freshly picked, taste the same to me. Heirlooms are weak, disease-prone, bug-infested and don't yield much.
 
2012-06-29 10:14:31 AM  

AMonkey'sUncle: They still have to be tough to hold up under mechanical processing, and as long as they pick them green to ship long distances they will taste like shiat.

You can polish a turd, but in the end it's still a turd.


but that's not what this about. Because color was a desired trait in tomatos a mutation that makes them ripen uniformly and into a deep red color was introduced into most modern tomatoes. That mutation makes them skip the dark green stage (just like their cousins the bell peppers) where much of the complex flavors and sugars are developed making even the fully ripe end product balnd and tasteless

The fact that now we don't even get the RED part of that bargain in the typical supermarket is just the Irony cherry on top of a bad decision
 
2012-06-29 10:22:33 AM  

rocinante721: First year growing. Just BIG BOYs.

Going heirloom next year.

What are good varieties, for both yield, taste & time (early vs. late harvest)


First let me strongly recommend these guys as your go to seed source. They've been in business since before the Revolutionary war so their Heirloom seed stocks are all originals and they are very helpful as far as planting advice:

D. Landreth Seeds

My particular favorties for sauce have been Golden Romas (just rememeber, unlike me the first time that they are GOLDEN and therefore never ripen past yellow) and Principe Borghese

for eating I loved the Amish Salad (They are about golf ball sized)

but feel free to go a-hunting and pick on of the 60-odd variteis that appeals to you
 
2012-06-29 10:56:51 AM  
Idiot, it's...
gifsoup.com
 
2012-06-29 10:59:48 AM  

Magorn: rocinante721: First year growing. Just BIG BOYs.

Going heirloom next year.

What are good varieties, for both yield, taste & time (early vs. late harvest)

First let me strongly recommend these guys as your go to seed source. They've been in business since before the Revolutionary war so their Heirloom seed stocks are all originals and they are very helpful as far as planting advice:

D. Landreth Seeds

My particular favorties for sauce have been Golden Romas (just rememeber, unlike me the first time that they are GOLDEN and therefore never ripen past yellow) and Principe Borghese

for eating I loved the Amish Salad (They are about golf ball sized)

but feel free to go a-hunting and pick on of the 60-odd variteis that appeals to you


Thx. One (1) internets in payment for you!
 
2012-06-29 11:24:32 AM  

Ashtrey: cretinbob: whyRpeoplesostupid: Yeah, I only eat the ones I grow, got about 6 weeks to wait...........

and only heirlooms



//purple cherokee ftw

I've got those, Brandywines, Moonglows, Mortgage Lifters, and black krim.


If you like Black Krim you'll love Paul Robeson, big and meaty and they bear into Fall. I've got Robesons, Costoluto Genovese, Principe Borghese and Brandywines going in PA. I figure I'll have Robesons by July 4 which is a month earlier than normal. Weird, warm Winter and Spring, gotta love it.

FWIW my tomatoes down south burned out already.
 
2012-06-29 11:28:56 AM  

windowseat: Ashtrey: cretinbob: whyRpeoplesostupid: Yeah, I only eat the ones I grow, got about 6 weeks to wait...........

and only heirlooms



//purple cherokee ftw

I've got those, Brandywines, Moonglows, Mortgage Lifters, and black krim.

If you like Black Krim you'll love Paul Robeson, big and meaty and they bear into Fall. I've got Robesons, Costoluto Genovese, Principe Borghese and Brandywines going in PA. I figure I'll have Robesons by July 4 which is a month earlier than normal. Weird, warm Winter and Spring, gotta love it.

FWIW my tomatoes down south burned out already.


Funny, browsing the landreth catalog for the above link I ran across the Paul Robeson variety for the very first time and thought "hmmm black russian Heirloom variety?...gotta try that" and then your post appears. It must be a sign
 
2012-06-29 11:42:29 AM  

windowseat: Ashtrey: cretinbob: whyRpeoplesostupid: Yeah, I only eat the ones I grow, got about 6 weeks to wait...........

and only heirlooms



//purple cherokee ftw

I've got those, Brandywines, Moonglows, Mortgage Lifters, and black krim.

If you like Black Krim you'll love Paul Robeson, big and meaty and they bear into Fall. I've got Robesons, Costoluto Genovese, Principe Borghese and Brandywines going in PA. I figure I'll have Robesons by July 4 which is a month earlier than normal. Weird, warm Winter and Spring, gotta love it.

FWIW my tomatoes down south burned out already.


Honestly I don't really like tomatos. I just like growing things. This is my first year doing heirlooms though, maybe I'll like them more.

Also have early sunrise corn, trucker's corn, okra, eggplant, cucumers,pole beans, 6 types of peppers and 4 types of hybrid tomatos.
 
2012-06-29 11:47:20 AM  

cretinbob: whyRpeoplesostupid: Yeah, I only eat the ones I grow, got about 6 weeks to wait...........

and only heirlooms

[a4dibbleplants.co.nz image 355x238]

//purple cherokee ftw


I have always meant to ask:Is "Heirloom" TM a brand of a seed supplier, the name of a specific tomato, or the generic Americanism umbrella term for anything that isn't the standard, red, flavourless, green house kind?
 
2012-06-29 11:50:46 AM  

uttertosh: cretinbob: whyRpeoplesostupid: Yeah, I only eat the ones I grow, got about 6 weeks to wait...........

and only heirlooms

[a4dibbleplants.co.nz image 355x238]

//purple cherokee ftw

I have always meant to ask:Is "Heirloom" TM a brand of a seed supplier, the name of a specific tomato, or the generic Americanism umbrella term for anything that isn't the standard, red, flavourless, green house kind?


Heirloom refers to plants that are open pollinated, stable crosses. Generally varieties that have been around for hundreds of years. Most hybrids will not breed true if you save the seed for the next crop, heirlooms will.
 
2012-06-29 11:53:26 AM  

uttertosh: I have always meant to ask:Is "Heirloom" TM a brand of a seed supplier, the name of a specific tomato, or the generic Americanism umbrella term for anything that isn't the standard, red, flavourless, green house kind?


Essentially the opposite of hybrid ~ 'matoes that have not been deliberately engineered, either genetically or by recent cross-breeding.

These tend to be more disease prone, depending on variety and locale.

However, it should be known that all tomatoes are relatively shallow on the breeding side, in that they have been cultivated very recently in human history, so there are not much differences & that whatever differences they do have come at the expense of their general health. Think of how purebred dogs tend to accumulate certain diseases.

Good article here on the case AGAINST heirlooms: LINKY
 
2012-06-29 11:57:45 AM  

Magorn: windowseat: Ashtrey: cretinbob: whyRpeoplesostupid: Yeah, I only eat the ones I grow, got about 6 weeks to wait...........

and only heirlooms



//purple cherokee ftw

I've got those, Brandywines, Moonglows, Mortgage Lifters, and black krim.

If you like Black Krim you'll love Paul Robeson, big and meaty and they bear into Fall. I've got Robesons, Costoluto Genovese, Principe Borghese and Brandywines going in PA. I figure I'll have Robesons by July 4 which is a month earlier than normal. Weird, warm Winter and Spring, gotta love it.

FWIW my tomatoes down south burned out already.

Funny, browsing the landreth catalog for the above link I ran across the Paul Robeson variety for the very first time and thought "hmmm black russian Heirloom variety?...gotta try that" and then your post appears. It must be a sign


I bought my Robeson seeds from a grower in Canada on EBay about 7 years ago and have saved the seed ever since. My Costoluto and Borghese seeds are from fruit I picked in Italy and the Brandywines were a trade with another seed saver.

Once you get into seed saving you know you've gone around the bend with your hobby, glasses of murky, stinky water everywhere at the end of the season.
 
2012-06-29 12:13:54 PM  

rocinante721: uttertosh: I have always meant to ask:Is "Heirloom" TM a brand of a seed supplier, the name of a specific tomato, or the generic Americanism umbrella term for anything that isn't the standard, red, flavourless, green house kind?

Essentially the opposite of hybrid ~ 'matoes that have not been deliberately engineered, either genetically or by recent cross-breeding.

These tend to be more disease prone, depending on variety and locale.

However, it should be known that all tomatoes are relatively shallow on the breeding side, in that they have been cultivated very recently in human history, so there are not much differences & that whatever differences they do have come at the expense of their general health. Think of how purebred dogs tend to accumulate certain diseases.

Good article here on the case AGAINST heirlooms: LINKY


I have a lot of notes on that article, but to keep it brief... The tomatoes Monsanto develops will be patented and people like me who save seeds will be criminals, not to mention that Monsanto's tomatoes will cross with mine if they are planted in a reasonable distance.

Heirloom varieties are for local/ home use and Monsanto wants to industrialize them.

I've never had a disease, fungal or insect problem with my heirlooms, sick plants are culled, insects are dealt with organically and I rotate crops to prevent blight from setting in. Factory farms are huge monocultures and are basically petri dishes that need antifungals and insecticide to keep them going.
 
2012-06-29 12:15:17 PM  

MDGeist: "StoneColdAtheist: Dwight_Yeast: /tomato and fresh mozzarella sandwich for lunch today!

Include fresh sweet basil leaves and a few drops of olive oil for an added dose of heaven."

Well this topic just took a turn into the gay zone.


Don't knock it 'til you've tried it...the sandwich, that is. ;^)
 
2012-06-29 12:33:10 PM  

windowseat: rocinante721: uttertosh: I have always meant to ask:Is "Heirloom" TM a brand of a seed supplier, the name of a specific tomato, or the generic Americanism umbrella term for anything that isn't the standard, red, flavourless, green house kind?

Essentially the opposite of hybrid ~ 'matoes that have not been deliberately engineered, either genetically or by recent cross-breeding.

These tend to be more disease prone, depending on variety and locale.

However, it should be known that all tomatoes are relatively shallow on the breeding side, in that they have been cultivated very recently in human history, so there are not much differences & that whatever differences they do have come at the expense of their general health. Think of how purebred dogs tend to accumulate certain diseases.

Good article here on the case AGAINST heirlooms: LINKY

I have a lot of notes on that article, but to keep it brief... The tomatoes Monsanto develops will be patented and people like me who save seeds will be criminals, not to mention that Monsanto's tomatoes will cross with mine if they are planted in a reasonable distance.

Heirloom varieties are for local/ home use and Monsanto wants to industrialize them.

I've never had a disease, fungal or insect problem with my heirlooms, sick plants are culled, insects are dealt with organically and I rotate crops to prevent blight from setting in. Factory farms are huge monocultures and are basically petri dishes that need antifungals and insecticide to keep them going.


I too have a problem Re: commercialization of engineered strains & patent enforcement.

I'm just saying there is no real problem ethically with growing an F1 hybrid opposed to a true heirloom, as heirlooms all have genetic weaknesses due to recent breeding & selections.

I'm a chemist, so I have no problem with fertilizers or hydroponics, but choose to grow organic as I want to have a healthy soil ecosystem with happy worms & slugs. I don't give two craps about what I buy, actually will seek out hydro-grown produce if all else equal.
 
2012-06-29 12:44:35 PM  
Having a pretty good year for tomatoes here in Arkansas. It is getting really hot now, so they are suffering a little now. Here is two days of harvest.

i296.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-29 01:18:22 PM  

rocinante721: windowseat: rocinante721: uttertosh: I have always meant to ask:Is "Heirloom" TM a brand of a seed supplier, the name of a specific tomato, or the generic Americanism umbrella term for anything that isn't the standard, red, flavourless, green house kind?

Essentially the opposite of hybrid ~ 'matoes that have not been deliberately engineered, either genetically or by recent cross-breeding.

These tend to be more disease prone, depending on variety and locale.

However, it should be known that all tomatoes are relatively shallow on the breeding side, in that they have been cultivated very recently in human history, so there are not much differences & that whatever differences they do have come at the expense of their general health. Think of how purebred dogs tend to accumulate certain diseases.

Good article here on the case AGAINST heirlooms: LINKY

I have a lot of notes on that article, but to keep it brief... The tomatoes Monsanto develops will be patented and people like me who save seeds will be criminals, not to mention that Monsanto's tomatoes will cross with mine if they are planted in a reasonable distance.

Heirloom varieties are for local/ home use and Monsanto wants to industrialize them.

I've never had a disease, fungal or insect problem with my heirlooms, sick plants are culled, insects are dealt with organically and I rotate crops to prevent blight from setting in. Factory farms are huge monocultures and are basically petri dishes that need antifungals and insecticide to keep them going.

I too have a problem Re: commercialization of engineered strains & patent enforcement.

I'm just saying there is no real problem ethically with growing an F1 hybrid opposed to a true heirloom, as heirlooms all have genetic weaknesses due to recent breeding & selections.

I'm a chemist, so I have no problem with fertilizers or hydroponics, but choose to grow organic as I want to have a healthy soil ecosystem with happy worms & slugs. I don't give two craps about w ...


I'm not a rabid organics person myself and I buy local hydro out of season if I need to. I like watching the worms and critters in the garden and way back when I was using chemicals and fertilizers it seemed like I was always chasing problems with another trip to the nursery for a spray. My personal experience is that organic takes more of my time, which I can't charge for and chemicals take money that I have to work for.
 
2012-06-29 02:24:24 PM  
Great, so vegetables are hipsters now too.

Will I have to get my zucchinis piercings? Or put scarves on my eggplants even when it's 75 out?
 
2012-06-29 03:46:35 PM  
I want my vintage vegetables in a vintage crate and vintage amish delivery. Also, has someone noticed that the lady in the article is also vintage?

I was so into vintage when the vintage wasnt vintage.
 
2012-06-29 06:48:52 PM  
Growing Brandywine and San Marzano this season, so getting a kick etc...
 
2012-06-30 09:37:05 AM  

rocinante721: uttertosh: I have always meant to ask:Is "Heirloom" TM a brand of a seed supplier, the name of a specific tomato, or the generic Americanism umbrella term for anything that isn't the standard, red, flavourless, green house kind?

Essentially the opposite of hybrid ~ 'matoes that have not been deliberately engineered, either genetically or by recent cross-breeding.

These tend to be more disease prone, depending on variety and locale.

However, it should be known that all tomatoes are relatively shallow on the breeding side, in that they have been cultivated very recently in human history, so there are not much differences & that whatever differences they do have come at the expense of their general health. Think of how purebred dogs tend to accumulate certain diseases.

Good article here on the case AGAINST heirlooms: LINKY


Nice link! :)

thanks to all replies!!
 
2012-06-30 12:25:15 PM  
I have great expectations, all of my tomato plants have green fruit, so I'm hoping this weekend's heat is OK for them. Last year the wife grabbed a couple of plants at the grocery store and I just stuck them in the ground. We had a few peppers and a crapload of eggplant, but 0 tomatoes. This year, I went with the Square Foot Gardening book. I have one cherry tomato plant that is 7ft high (sweet baby girl hybrid started from seed at the end of March.) and we've been eating cucumbers for a couple of weeks, and lettuce for a couple of months. Definitely an improvement over the "stick it in the ground and see if it grows" method.

I'm thinking I'll try some heirlooms next year. I've been hearing about the Brandywine a lot. The Purple Cherokee and Black Krim kind of creep me out with the color.

It's pretty neat to plant a seed and then watch it go from seedling to massive bush.
 
2012-07-01 11:00:33 AM  

Chevello: I have great expectations, all of my tomato plants have green fruit, so I'm hoping this weekend's heat is OK for them. Last year the wife grabbed a couple of plants at the grocery store and I just stuck them in the ground. We had a few peppers and a crapload of eggplant, but 0 tomatoes. This year, I went with the Square Foot Gardening book. I have one cherry tomato plant that is 7ft high (sweet baby girl hybrid started from seed at the end of March.) and we've been eating cucumbers for a couple of weeks, and lettuce for a couple of months. Definitely an improvement over the "stick it in the ground and see if it grows" method.

I'm thinking I'll try some heirlooms next year. I've been hearing about the Brandywine a lot. The Purple Cherokee and Black Krim kind of creep me out with the color.

It's pretty neat to plant a seed and then watch it go from seedling to massive bush.


Good move! I went from raised beds to containers a couple years ago and will not go back.
 
2012-07-01 12:11:07 PM  

StoneColdAtheist: Chevello: I have great expectations, all of my tomato plants have green fruit, so I'm hoping this weekend's heat is OK for them. Last year the wife grabbed a couple of plants at the grocery store and I just stuck them in the ground. We had a few peppers and a crapload of eggplant, but 0 tomatoes. This year, I went with the Square Foot Gardening book. I have one cherry tomato plant that is 7ft high (sweet baby girl hybrid started from seed at the end of March.) and we've been eating cucumbers for a couple of weeks, and lettuce for a couple of months. Definitely an improvement over the "stick it in the ground and see if it grows" method.

I'm thinking I'll try some heirlooms next year. I've been hearing about the Brandywine a lot. The Purple Cherokee and Black Krim kind of creep me out with the color.

It's pretty neat to plant a seed and then watch it go from seedling to massive bush.

Good move! I went from raised beds to containers a couple years ago and will not go back.


Are your containers portable (or semi-portable)? I'm still sort of half and half. The beds are the old flower beds next to the back of the house, dug out, raised up and filled with Mel's Mix. They are still open on the bottom. When fall comes I guess I'll see how deep the roots went on the toms. If they didn't need to go below the mix, then I guess I'll know I did the mix right. I may put a couple of bottomed boxes on the patio next year.
 
2012-07-01 12:25:32 PM  

Chevello: StoneColdAtheist: Good move! I went from raised beds to containers a couple years ago and will not go back.

Are your containers portable (or semi-portable)? I'm still sort of half and half. The beds are the old flower beds next to the back of the house, dug out, raised up and filled with Mel's Mix. They are still open on the bottom. When fall comes I guess I'll see how deep the roots went on the toms. If they didn't need to go below the mix, then I guess I'll know I did the mix right. I may put a couple of bottomed boxes on the patio next year.


I have stoney, heavy clay, so built-up beds from top soil (since knocked down and spread out). To start with containers I initially used 4-gallon kitty litter tubs, but starting with the second year graduated to 7-gal Smart Pots with handles. That makes them completely portable...outside ~8 months a year, and in my 8' x 20' south-facing sunroom over the winter. I also built a drip irrigation system which is plugged into a programmable time to ensure proper watering and feeding.
 
2012-07-01 12:27:07 PM  
BTW, I still use two pre-existing flower beds...no reason to give them up for larger annuals.
 
2012-07-02 10:06:26 AM  

StoneColdAtheist: graduated to 7-gal Smart Pots with handles


Also thanks for that!!

Our first allotment grow is Link - neither of us had previous experience. Learning, whilst providing food for family is soooooo damned cool. :-)
 
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