If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(PCWorld)   Apple's latest patent victory bars US sales of Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1   (pcworld.com) divider line 53
    More: Interesting, Galaxy Tab, Samsung, Apple, United States, Motorola Mobility, dessert bars, VPN, plain  
•       •       •

1963 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Jun 2012 at 9:48 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



53 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-06-28 08:11:41 AM
"[The patent] relates to 'detecting a movement of an object on the touch screen display.' This movement includes iOS's scrolling in the direction of finger movement..."

o.O

"Scary" would've been a better tag..
 
2012-06-28 08:35:32 AM

Lucky LaRue: "[The patent] relates to 'detecting a movement of an object on the touch screen display.' This movement includes iOS's scrolling in the direction of finger movement..."

o.O

"Scary" would've been a better tag..


They've patented most emotions, too. So if you want to be afraid, you have to travel to Manitoba. And even then, only on alternating weekends.
 
2012-06-28 08:44:36 AM

ModernLuddite: Lucky LaRue: "[The patent] relates to 'detecting a movement of an object on the touch screen display.' This movement includes iOS's scrolling in the direction of finger movement..."

o.O

"Scary" would've been a better tag..

They've patented most emotions, too. So if you want to be afraid, you have to travel to Manitoba. And even then, only on alternating weekends.


Stop trolling.

Everyone knows Canadians don't have emotions.
 
2012-06-28 09:02:14 AM
...the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has awarded Apple 27 new patents, including a patent for scrolling, rotating, and scaling documents on touch screen devices.

So...they essentially patented tablets in general, then?

Seriously, isn't that like Kraft trying to patent macaroni covered in liquid cheese?
 
2012-06-28 09:08:28 AM

kid_icarus: ...the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has awarded Apple 27 new patents, including a patent for scrolling, rotating, and scaling documents on touch screen devices.

So...they essentially patented tablets in general, then?

Seriously, isn't that like Kraft trying to patent macaroni covered in liquid cheese?


When it comes to technology, the patent office is staffed with resurrected 16th century amnesiacs who are amazed and agape at the most rudimentary technologies and can't remember anyone has ever done something similar.

Note that this is the same patent office that refused a patent for the demolition ball on the end of a crane because it resembled a medieval weapon - yet could see through to approving Amazon's one-click patent.
 
2012-06-28 09:13:16 AM

vygramul: kid_icarus: ...the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has awarded Apple 27 new patents, including a patent for scrolling, rotating, and scaling documents on touch screen devices.

So...they essentially patented tablets in general, then?

Seriously, isn't that like Kraft trying to patent macaroni covered in liquid cheese?

When it comes to technology, the patent office is staffed with resurrected 16th century amnesiacs who are amazed and agape at the most rudimentary technologies and can't remember anyone has ever done something similar.

Note that this is the same patent office that refused a patent for the demolition ball on the end of a crane because it resembled a medieval weapon - yet could see through to approving Amazon's one-click patent.


I think everyone should listen to This American Life's episode on Patent Wars. This kind of crap is strangling innovation and start-up companies.
 
2012-06-28 09:26:29 AM

Lucky LaRue: "[The patent] relates to 'detecting a movement of an object on the touch screen display.' This movement includes iOS's scrolling in the direction of finger movement..."

o.O

"Scary" would've been a better tag..


Actually, the patents that Apple got for that is pretty limited in scope because they're a ton of art in the area of multitouch gestures already. To sum it up, what they got a patent on using the touchscreen to detect a finger on the list, and when the finger gets to the end of the list, the list will continue to move with the finger even though there is nothing else but empty space at the end of the list, and then having the list bounce back until the empty space is gone.

As far as I know, Android doesn't even really use it and it's only a stylistic flourish anyway.
 
2012-06-28 09:54:07 AM
I expect this thread to be stuffed with reasoned discussion about the nuances of the actual claims in the patent, and completely devoid of people looking at the abstract and going, "holy crap! they patented AIR! OMG HOW IS THAT LEGAL? STUPD PATENTS"

But I'm also delusional, and typing on a cardboard box in an alley while talking to a blue cat named Victor who wants me to eat the entrails of the dog that got hit by a car around the corner. Reality and I aren't on speaking terms.
 
2012-06-28 10:00:08 AM

RexTalionis: Lucky LaRue: "[The patent] relates to 'detecting a movement of an object on the touch screen display.' This movement includes iOS's scrolling in the direction of finger movement..."

o.O

"Scary" would've been a better tag..

Actually, the patents that Apple got for that is pretty limited in scope because they're a ton of art in the area of multitouch gestures already. To sum it up, what they got a patent on using the touchscreen to detect a finger on the list, and when the finger gets to the end of the list, the list will continue to move with the finger even though there is nothing else but empty space at the end of the list, and then having the list bounce back until the empty space is gone.

As far as I know, Android doesn't even really use it and it's only a stylistic flourish anyway.


What? WP7 does that. When's the hammer going to drop on Microsoft then? :P
 
2012-06-28 10:07:26 AM

t3knomanser: I expect this thread to be stuffed with reasoned discussion about the nuances of the actual claims in the patent, and completely devoid of people looking at the abstract and going, "holy crap! they patented AIR! OMG HOW IS THAT LEGAL? STUPD PATENTS"

But I'm also delusional, and typing on a cardboard box in an alley while talking to a blue cat named Victor who wants me to eat the entrails of the dog that got hit by a car around the corner. Reality and I aren't on speaking terms.


I kind of love this.

I declare a new rule, anyone who wants to biatch in a patent thread about "OMG OBVIOUSZORZ! I HEARD THAT ONE GUY HAD A COUSIN THAT HAD A FRIEND THAT KNEW A GUY WHO PATENTED A HAM SANDWICH" has to at least read this first:

KSR v. Teleflex

/preferably the actual case, not just the wiki
//sadly cannot declare shiat
 
2012-06-28 10:08:11 AM

DjangoStonereaver:

Stop trolling.

Everyone knows Canadians don't have emotions.


i881.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-28 10:13:40 AM

RexTalionis: Actually, the patents that Apple got for that is pretty limited in scope because they're a ton of art in the area of multitouch gestures already. To sum it up, what they got a patent on using the touchscreen to detect a finger on the list, and when the finger gets to the end of the list, the list will continue to move with the finger even though there is nothing else but empty space at the end of the list, and then having the list bounce back until the empty space is gone.

As far as I know, Android doesn't even really use it and it's only a stylistic flourish anyway.


Pound to a penny, there's prior art on some sort of desktop system for that, like "window moves as mouse moves beyond the area".
 
2012-06-28 10:14:07 AM
This patent shiat is making me rapidly become a Luddite.
 
2012-06-28 10:22:29 AM
iPhones were revolutionary, yes. However, the black-box framework that Apple implements on it's devices (no memory cards, no usb, m4a and iTunes in general, etc) is complete and utter horseshiat.

Android is a much superior OS but people have been sold on the "look and feel" of Apple. I guess if you don't like to have any flexibility with your personal computing device/phone then rock on!
 
wee [TotalFark]
2012-06-28 10:24:40 AM

Lucky LaRue: "Scary" would've been a better tag..


No shiat. Apple is concentrated evil...
 
2012-06-28 10:25:51 AM
Sue different.
 
2012-06-28 10:29:33 AM

DirkValentine: I guess if you don't like to have any flexibility with your personal computing device/phone then rock on!


Personally? Not particularly. A cleverly pruned tree of options is more valuable to most users than a riotous bush that gives you the opportunity to do anything. I used to keep my iPhone jailbroken to gain more flexibility, until I noticed that I never used it.
 
2012-06-28 10:43:39 AM
DirkValentine:

I do like the "no memory card" thing. My Evo had cards, but it also had so little internal storage that I couldn't even update aps and very few of them could be moved to the card. I sold it back and got a Galaxy Nexus. It has no cards, and I still have a ton of space, even with all of my apps. Still Android (Ice Cream Sandwich). I love it, so far.

/Also have the Tab 10.1 (v2)
 
2012-06-28 10:52:36 AM

DirkValentine: iPhones were revolutionary, yes.


lol no they weren't. Smart phones with apps existed for years before the iPhone
 
2012-06-28 10:59:33 AM
I can see Samsung calling for a monopoly lawsuit against Apple for trying to corner the market in Tablets. And it should work. It worked on AT&T, causing Bell South to come into existence, and Microsoft has to allow 3rd party internet programs for Windows. Why can't a judge reverse this?
 
2012-06-28 11:01:31 AM

machoprogrammer: DirkValentine: iPhones were revolutionary, yes.

lol no they weren't. Smart phones with apps existed for years before the iPhone


Agreed they weren't. Apple just marketed them well to the common person who didn't not need a smart phone. That was what Apple did. Everything that Apple has tossed out on their iPhones as revolutionary is not. The whole Siri thing was done way long ago for the blind. They just added it for lazy people who are to lazy to look it up on Google.
 
2012-06-28 11:05:35 AM

machoprogrammer: DirkValentine: iPhones were revolutionary, yes.

lol no they weren't. Smart phones with apps existed for years before the iPhone


I honestly didn't know that. I was using a flip phone up until about 1.5 years ago. they were the ones to revolutionize the touch-screen UI, right?
 
2012-06-28 11:07:33 AM

DirkValentine:
I honestly didn't know that. I was using a flip phone up until about 1.5 years ago. they were the ones to revolutionize the touch-screen UI, right?


Yup, the only new thing iPhones brought was multitouch.
 
2012-06-28 11:16:56 AM
This only affects the older version of the Samsung 10.1 tablet, doesn't it?
 
2012-06-28 11:23:00 AM

machoprogrammer: Smart phones with apps existed for years before the iPhone


There was nothing on the market like the iPhone when it came out. There was nothing that looked like it, there was nothing with that kind of UI. Android completely changed gears, practically the next day, to start behaving and looking more like iOS (and yes, there were Android builds available before the iPhone came out).

Now, sure, there's nothing particularly revolutionary in the technology of the iPhone. But if you're being that pedantic, there's been no "revolution" in phone technology since the early Palm devices. Probably longer. What Apple did was put a bunch of existing technology together in a way that made sense and could be sold to the general public. That's more than just marketing- it's design. Design matters. It's more than mere look and feel. It's how features combine and interact, it's how a device feels when you use it, it's how the functional components are immediately obvious.

You had to learn to use a Crackberry. Nobody needed to learn to use an iPhone.

That's nice, but there was an even bigger revolution that happened. Apple decided that they were going to tell the telcos how the phone worked. Until Apple did that, it was the phone companies that controlled the features and software that came on your phone.
 
2012-06-28 11:24:11 AM
You can pry my Galaxy Tab 10.1 from my cold dead hands.

/Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
//I kid, first order of business was to delete that signature.
 
2012-06-28 11:24:14 AM
Incidentally, Apple has to put up several billion dollars in escrow for this preliminary injunction. If a higher court subsequently decided that the preliminary injunction against the Samsung 10.1 tablet was improper, then Apple has to pay Samsung for the financial damages they suffered due to the injunction.
 
2012-06-28 11:26:23 AM

RexTalionis: If a higher court subsequently decided that the preliminary injunction against the Samsung 10.1 tablet was improper, then Apple has to pay Samsung for the financial damages they suffered due to the injunction.


Which is how it should work. It should be expensive to patent troll.
 
2012-06-28 12:01:18 PM

t3knomanser: machoprogrammer: Smart phones with apps existed for years before the iPhone

There was nothing on the market like the iPhone when it came out. There was nothing that looked like it, there was nothing with that kind of UI. Android completely changed gears, practically the next day, to start behaving and looking more like iOS (and yes, there were Android builds available before the iPhone came out).

Now, sure, there's nothing particularly revolutionary in the technology of the iPhone. But if you're being that pedantic, there's been no "revolution" in phone technology since the early Palm devices. Probably longer. What Apple did was put a bunch of existing technology together in a way that made sense and could be sold to the general public. That's more than just marketing- it's design. Design matters. It's more than mere look and feel. It's how features combine and interact, it's how a device feels when you use it, it's how the functional components are immediately obvious.

You had to learn to use a Crackberry. Nobody needed to learn to use an iPhone.

That's nice, but there was an even bigger revolution that happened. Apple decided that they were going to tell the telcos how the phone worked. Until Apple did that, it was the phone companies that controlled the features and software that came on your phone.


But Apple is not patenting design, they are patenting functionality that they did not originate.

Also,the iphone is anything but easy to use. Wish work supported Android, it is a much cleaner experience.
 
2012-06-28 12:14:53 PM

machodonkeywrestler: But Apple is not patenting design, they are patenting functionality that they did not originate.


Actually, they are. The idea that two finger pinching motions zoom is a design element. And that is an idea that they originated (and let's be accurate: they didn't patent a two finger zoom; they patented a specific implementation of the two finger zoom).

machodonkeywrestler: Wish work supported Android, it is a much cleaner experience


My brief experience with Android ended when I found the default mapping application to be significantly worse than the iOS one. That's no mean feat! It was farking terrible. There were some nice amenities, like the drag-to-launch unlock, but there were so many little landmines in core functionality from maps to web browsing that I just couldn't take using it for very long.

Yes, I know that I could customize it and remove all of those landmines. But I have no interest in putting effort in to make basic functionality work. I'm sure that there are Android devices for sale that have already addressed these complaints. But my experiences to date have been pretty negative.

Also, the hardware usually sucks. I played with the latest Captivate that is out/coming out shortly depending on when you ordered. It's flimsy, gigantic, and the camera sticks out of the back, instead of being recessed to prevent scratches. Who designs that crap?
 
2012-06-28 12:37:42 PM
It'll be interesting if they try to pull this crap with Microsoft when the Surface is released. Samsung makes chips for Apple, but those chips can be replaced by their own designs. The ecosystem Microsoft has made, which you have to conform to if you want to sell a product (Office, Exchange, ActiveSync, Windows interoperability, etc.) is something Apple can't replicate and is something Microsoft could yank out from under them if they decided to sue for infringement. That will be how this behavior stops, if it does at all.
 
2012-06-28 12:46:35 PM

Marine1: It'll be interesting if they try to pull this crap with Microsoft when the Surface is released.


Surface likely doesn't infringe any of their patents. I've played with one of the prototypes. It's far more like the old Windows Tablets than it is like an iPad. Metro is like a touch-friendly launcher/app-host.
 
2012-06-28 01:04:44 PM
shpritz: Yup, the only new thing iPhones brought was multitouch.

To phones,

Touchpads have had the capability for multi touch for a while now (it's just been disabled/not implemented in operating systems, because the OSes had no clue about multi touch).

// the touchpads themselves were already multi touch capable, they're getting all of the signaling data from the grid. Someone just had to tweak the drivers to detect two touches instead of one.

Multi-touch system and method for emulating modifier keys via fingertip chords - filed by logitech in 1996 (10 years before the release of the iPhone).

// Something I've noticed is that there are a lot of patents to do the same thing, but just differing in method. EX

1) US6246395 Dec 17, 1998 Jun 12, 2001 Hewlett-Packard Company Palm pressure rejection method and apparatus for touchscreens ("There is provided a method and apparatus for categorizing substantially simultaneous inputs to a touchscreen.")

2) US7561146 Aug 25, 2004 Jul 14, 2009 Apple Inc. Method and apparatus to reject accidental contact on a touchpad.

And

US8023262 Sep 18, 2008 Sep 20, 2011 Apple Inc. Lid-closed detector

Laptops used magnets and a sensor embedded in the bezel long before apple patented their new method for detecting that the lid is closed (I don't know what it is, I got tired of reading through the patent lingo), but I found this part funny.

"Another problem is that sensors, magnet sensors in particular, are difficult to assemble into notebook computers because they add a level of unwanted complexity."

Isn't this essentially "farking magnets, how do they work" :D

// these days, so many patents are about one-upmanship. And a lot of the 1ups are something that's just obvious. IE remote controls that used to use IR, moving on to use wireless. Anyone that was around then watching tech progress would have thought of it, it was just a question of who got it working first and patented it. Being first is key in the patent arms race (even if you only half ass it).
 
2012-06-28 01:06:13 PM

t3knomanser: Marine1: It'll be interesting if they try to pull this crap with Microsoft when the Surface is released.

Surface likely doesn't infringe any of their patents. I've played with one of the prototypes. It's far more like the old Windows Tablets than it is like an iPad. Metro is like a touch-friendly launcher/app-host.


Core i5 or Tegra version?
 
2012-06-28 01:11:47 PM

wee: Lucky LaRue: "Scary" would've been a better tag..

No shiat. Apple is concentrated evil...


I think it's time for Sam and Dean to pay Steve Jobs a visit.
s14.postimage.org
 
2012-06-28 01:27:24 PM

Marine1: Core i5 or Tegra version?


i5. At the time, I wasn't told it was called "Surface". A Microsoft rep came by to talk about TFS stuff, and said, "Hey, you guys want to see a prototype tablet we're working on?"

Even on ARM, though, I don't see how it's going to change except that you have only the Metro hosted applications. The cool thing, on the other hand, is that Metro allows HTML5 applications to behave as native Metro apps. That's really sweet.
 
2012-06-28 01:38:35 PM

t3knomanser: Marine1: Core i5 or Tegra version?

i5. At the time, I wasn't told it was called "Surface". A Microsoft rep came by to talk about TFS stuff, and said, "Hey, you guys want to see a prototype tablet we're working on?"

Even on ARM, though, I don't see how it's going to change except that you have only the Metro hosted applications. The cool thing, on the other hand, is that Metro allows HTML5 applications to behave as native Metro apps. That's really sweet.


Well, I'm thinking that the i5 would seem more like the Windows tablets of old because it is... Intel processor, full Windows, etc. The ARM version, though... that might be a bit more like an iPad. You get WinRT with that, and it can only run Metro apps. Whether or not it's similar enough (or more precisely, threatening enough) to Apple will probably be the determinant of whether or not they try to claim infringement on it later. There's all sorts of patents (most of them are bogus, IMO) that Apple has on the tablet form factor, and a lot of those are quite vague.
 
2012-06-28 01:49:37 PM

Marine1: and it can only run Metro apps


But even the Metro apps feel more WinTab than they do iPad.

Marine1: There's all sorts of patents (most of them are bogus, IMO) that Apple has on the tablet form factor, and a lot of those are quite vague.


Vague is a matter of opinion, and it also varies by region (the US doesn't have any look-and-feel patents, Europe does). But the Surface device doesn't come anywhere near any of Apple's protected IP.

The Surface design, in pretty much every way, has been steered quite far away from the iPad's design cues and approach. If I were laying odds, the odds of there being any meaningful competition between the two devices, let alone any litigation, are very long indeed.
 
2012-06-28 02:14:09 PM

lordargent: Something I've noticed is that there are a lot of patents to do the same thing, but just differing in method


Well, that's kinda the point. You don't patent the end result, you patent the method of getting to the end result.
 
2012-06-28 02:16:32 PM

RexTalionis: Apple has to put up several billion dollars in escrow for this preliminary injunction


$2.8 million, not billion. It was what Samsung and Apple agreed would be adequate.
 
2012-06-28 03:21:08 PM
My company just got hit with a patent attack, as well as a bunch of other LARGE companies. The patent, amongst other things, involves the process of taking payments over the phone and inputting them into a "computer input interface". the whole process, nothing specific, just a very general process.
 
2012-06-28 03:47:42 PM

Inauxas: My company just got hit with a patent attack, as well as a bunch of other LARGE companies. The patent, amongst other things, involves the process of taking payments over the phone and inputting them into a "computer input interface". the whole process, nothing specific, just a very general process.


You really don't think there's more to it than "taking payments over the phone and inputting them into a computer input interface"? Like, literally, claim 1 is "A method for taking payments, comprising: receiving payment information via a telephone; and inputting, via a computer input interface, the received payment information."

If that's what it says, you'd have an incredibly good case. Like, spend no money whatsoever, and just file a motion to dismiss.
But that's not what it says.
 
2012-06-28 04:00:43 PM

Theaetetus: RexTalionis: Apple has to put up several billion dollars in escrow for this preliminary injunction

$2.8 million, not billion. It was what Samsung and Apple agreed would be adequate.


Ah, well, okay. I got that tidbit from Tech News Today podcast as played through my phone's speaker, so I probably misheard the million as billion.
 
2012-06-28 05:51:36 PM
Ah, patent trolling. www.poster.net
 
2012-06-28 09:14:54 PM
Feel the butthurt.

/Fark you assholes
 
2012-06-29 02:36:52 AM

t3knomanser: machoprogrammer: Smart phones with apps existed for years before the iPhone

There was nothing on the market like the iPhone when it came out. There was nothing that looked like it, there was nothing with that kind of UI. Android completely changed gears, practically the next day, to start behaving and looking more like iOS (and yes, there were Android builds available before the iPhone came out).

Now, sure, there's nothing particularly revolutionary in the technology of the iPhone. But if you're being that pedantic, there's been no "revolution" in phone technology since the early Palm devices. Probably longer. What Apple did was put a bunch of existing technology together in a way that made sense and could be sold to the general public. That's more than just marketing- it's design. Design matters. It's more than mere look and feel. It's how features combine and interact, it's how a device feels when you use it, it's how the functional components are immediately obvious.

You had to learn to use a Crackberry. Nobody needed to learn to use an iPhone.

That's nice, but there was an even bigger revolution that happened. Apple decided that they were going to tell the telcos how the phone worked. Until Apple did that, it was the phone companies that controlled the features and software that came on your phone.


Frankly, every time I need to use my wife's itouch for something, I get all stabby until I remember to pretend I'm a 6-year-old who's never seen a computer before.

I farking HATE iOS. Why the fark should I have to go find a program somewhere in another application just to shut it down? Why the fark would I want a program to keep using memory if all instances are closed? My one gripe with android is that it uses this idiotic model. When the app market is glutted with products specifically to help you close programs, you know you made a design error.
 
2012-06-29 02:40:24 AM

t3knomanser: machodonkeywrestler: But Apple is not patenting design, they are patenting functionality that they did not originate.

Actually, they are. The idea that two finger pinching motions zoom is a design element. And that is an idea that they originated (and let's be accurate: they didn't patent a two finger zoom; they patented a specific implementation of the two finger zoom).

machodonkeywrestler: Wish work supported Android, it is a much cleaner experience

My brief experience with Android ended when I found the default mapping application to be significantly worse than the iOS one. That's no mean feat! It was farking terrible. There were some nice amenities, like the drag-to-launch unlock, but there were so many little landmines in core functionality from maps to web browsing that I just couldn't take using it for very long.

Yes, I know that I could customize it and remove all of those landmines. But I have no interest in putting effort in to make basic functionality work. I'm sure that there are Android devices for sale that have already addressed these complaints. But my experiences to date have been pretty negative.

Also, the hardware usually sucks. I played with the latest Captivate that is out/coming out shortly depending on when you ordered. It's flimsy, gigantic, and the camera sticks out of the back, instead of being recessed to prevent scratches. Who designs that crap?


"Basic functionality", like Flash, for example?
 
2012-06-29 04:17:34 AM
I have a Galaxy tab 7 and a galaxy tab 10.1

... and a playbook.

I LOVE the 10.1 tab.

Screw you apple.

(typing this on my macbook air.)
 
2012-06-29 08:16:08 AM

Z-clipped: Why the fark would I want a program to keep using memory if all instances are closed?


Who the hell cares what memory is being used, so long as the OS is good about nuking apps when it honestly needs more? OSX works the same way, and it's fantastic. In the list of things I want to do, manage tasks is not one of them. It's not a value added operation. It's basic maintenance.

Z-clipped: "Basic functionality", like Flash, for example?


Support for a third party vendor's software isn't "basic functionality". The only reason I even have Flash on my desktop is because I use Chrome which embeds it.
 
2012-06-29 10:04:55 AM
Wait, they patented gestures on a touch-screen? Pinch-to-zoom, scrolling, pan-tilt? What the farking hell?

I could probably pull up some sci-fi movies from the late 80's or early 90's that had that shiat. Can art count as prior art? Apple needs to EABOD and DIAF for such blatant patent trolling.
 
2012-06-29 11:14:26 AM

Z-clipped: t3knomanser: machoprogrammer: Smart phones with apps existed for years before the iPhone

There was nothing on the market like the iPhone when it came out. There was nothing that looked like it, there was nothing with that kind of UI. Android completely changed gears, practically the next day, to start behaving and looking more like iOS (and yes, there were Android builds available before the iPhone came out).

Now, sure, there's nothing particularly revolutionary in the technology of the iPhone. But if you're being that pedantic, there's been no "revolution" in phone technology since the early Palm devices. Probably longer. What Apple did was put a bunch of existing technology together in a way that made sense and could be sold to the general public. That's more than just marketing- it's design. Design matters. It's more than mere look and feel. It's how features combine and interact, it's how a device feels when you use it, it's how the functional components are immediately obvious.

You had to learn to use a Crackberry. Nobody needed to learn to use an iPhone.

That's nice, but there was an even bigger revolution that happened. Apple decided that they were going to tell the telcos how the phone worked. Until Apple did that, it was the phone companies that controlled the features and software that came on your phone.

Frankly, every time I need to use my wife's itouch for something, I get all stabby until I remember to pretend I'm a 6-year-old who's never seen a computer before.

I farking HATE iOS. Why the fark should I have to go find a program somewhere in another application just to shut it down? Why the fark would I want a program to keep using memory if all instances are closed? My one gripe with android is that it uses this idiotic model. When the app market is glutted with products specifically to help you close programs, you know you made a design error.


App killing programs are popular because they are easy to program and there are many people, such as yourself, that don't know how unneccessary they are. Android is programmed to keep as many apps loaded in RAM as possible. This allows you to re-open a previously opened app faster. Android OS does a good job of killing apps when it needs more RAM for currently running apps. Killing apps that are using CPU cycles helps save battery life, however.

There are some problem apps from crappy programmers (ahem... Zynga) that do actively use CPU and try their damnedest to not be killed. I've found (in Zynga's case anyway) that these are generally iPhone apps ported over to Android, and can't figure out how to use a damn push notification and are constantly "polling" for updates.
 
2012-06-29 11:27:17 AM

Z-clipped: t3knomanser: machoprogrammer: Smart phones with apps existed for years before the iPhone

There was nothing on the market like the iPhone when it came out. There was nothing that looked like it, there was nothing with that kind of UI. Android completely changed gears, practically the next day, to start behaving and looking more like iOS (and yes, there were Android builds available before the iPhone came out).

Now, sure, there's nothing particularly revolutionary in the technology of the iPhone. But if you're being that pedantic, there's been no "revolution" in phone technology since the early Palm devices. Probably longer. What Apple did was put a bunch of existing technology together in a way that made sense and could be sold to the general public. That's more than just marketing- it's design. Design matters. It's more than mere look and feel. It's how features combine and interact, it's how a device feels when you use it, it's how the functional components are immediately obvious.

You had to learn to use a Crackberry. Nobody needed to learn to use an iPhone.

That's nice, but there was an even bigger revolution that happened. Apple decided that they were going to tell the telcos how the phone worked. Until Apple did that, it was the phone companies that controlled the features and software that came on your phone.

Frankly, every time I need to use my wife's itouch for something, I get all stabby until I remember to pretend I'm a 6-year-old who's never seen a computer before.

I farking HATE iOS. Why the fark should I have to go find a program somewhere in another application just to shut it down? Why the fark would I want a program to keep using memory if all instances are closed? My one gripe with android is that it uses this idiotic model. When the app market is glutted with products specifically to help you close programs, you know you made a design error.


Task managers are obsolete. Froyo and later versions of Android move memory around so the ones you're not using don't get it. If you're noticing a performance decrease from apps, its likely because one of them isn't functioning correctly.
 
2012-06-29 12:11:11 PM
I want to get the patent on patent trolling as a business model...

It`s just a method to get results isn`t it? That means it can be patented. Make the whole thing explode then we will have to find a better way.
 
Displayed 53 of 53 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report