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(Gizmodo)   Scientists invent particles that will let you live without breathing. Pull my finger   (gizmodo.com) divider line 65
    More: Cool, respiratory failure, Children's Hospital Boston, lipids, capillaries, test tubes, atoms, cell membranes, scientists  
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6353 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Jun 2012 at 12:13 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-28 12:15:12 AM
This article brought to you from the FUTURE!
 
2012-06-28 12:15:50 AM
Stupid EDT...
 
2012-06-28 12:22:39 AM

Kuroshin: This article brought to you from the FUTURE!


Yeah ... this is pretty big.
 
2012-06-28 12:22:43 AM
It's things like this that make me okay with animal testing.
 
2012-06-28 12:25:29 AM
Can someone post a link to the actual article/information and not some lame Gawker shiat?
 
2012-06-28 12:30:56 AM
Just don't drop it.

the-adventurers-club.typepad.com
 
2012-06-28 12:32:05 AM
So I inject this into a lifeless body.

Then I hook a pacemaker type device up to force blood circulation.

Possibly might need to hook a 3rd device up to the brain to stimulate... stuff. With science.



And viola! Zombies.
 
2012-06-28 12:39:17 AM
This can have multiple uses ranging from altitude sickness to lung failure to drowning. I like this!
 
2012-06-28 12:48:22 AM
So, how do you test for this? It's the next level of blood doping. One quick injection before the race and -poof- you have 3-4 times the oxygen content of your own blood cells, and the only residue left sounds like slightly elevated lipid levels. And you know that long before this winds up in hospitals and on ambulances, it will wind up in some swimmer or cyclist's blood doping bag.
 
2012-06-28 12:50:39 AM
How large an IV do you need to get this enough oxygen into your blood to stay alive? And where do you put the feed in, the ventricle?
 
2012-06-28 12:56:23 AM
Isn't an important component of breathing (and rocking) the exhale? It's to rid the body of the waste products of cellular respiration, specifically CO2. Do the lungs fill up from the inside, causing you to exhale when you never inhaled?
 
2012-06-28 12:58:51 AM

devildog123: So, how do you test for this? It's the next level of blood doping. One quick injection before the race and -poof- you have 3-4 times the oxygen content of your own blood cells, and the only residue left sounds like slightly elevated lipid levels. And you know that long before this winds up in hospitals and on ambulances, it will wind up in some swimmer or cyclist's blood doping bag.


Really?
 
2012-06-28 01:10:46 AM
Great, oxygen that will make us fat.

No, it's honestly quite awesome, I can't imagine a syringe would have enough oxygen for the whole body, maybe an IV bag to be added slowly.
 
2012-06-28 01:12:37 AM

Precision Boobery: Isn't an important component of breathing (and rocking) the exhale? It's to rid the body of the waste products of cellular respiration, specifically CO2. Do the lungs fill up from the inside, causing you to exhale when you never inhaled?


Most of what you exhale is the oxygen that you inhaled. Our lungs have really shiatty membranes - they don't absorb that well.

There must be a comic book supervillain somewhere with the ability to exhale pure CO2 and suffocate victims.
 
2012-06-28 01:13:11 AM
With this, Kurzweil's singularity, and the Google Goggles, soon humanity will fulfill our destiny of becoming Übermensch.
 
2012-06-28 01:15:51 AM

HotWingAgenda: Most of what you exhale is the oxygen that you inhaled. Our lungs have really shiatty membranes - they don't absorb that well.

There must be a comic book supervillain somewhere with the ability to exhale pure CO2 and suffocate victims.


Dang, now I wonder how much O2 we absorb through our skin compared to how much we absorb through our lungs. You can suffocate if you paint yourself in a non breathable membrane right?
 
2012-06-28 01:20:12 AM
HotWingAgenda
Precision Boobery: Isn't an important component of breathing (and rocking) the exhale? It's to rid the body of the waste products of cellular respiration, specifically CO2. Do the lungs fill up from the inside, causing you to exhale when you never inhaled?

Most of what you exhale is the oxygen that you inhaled. Our lungs have really shiatty membranes - they don't absorb that well.


That's beside the point. The buildup of CO2 in the bloodstream is what causes the urge to breathe. As long as your cells are still working, you're going to have carbon dioxide, and you're going to want to breathe.
 
2012-06-28 01:30:54 AM

Ambivalence: HotWingAgenda: Most of what you exhale is the oxygen that you inhaled. Our lungs have really shiatty membranes - they don't absorb that well.

There must be a comic book supervillain somewhere with the ability to exhale pure CO2 and suffocate victims.

Dang, now I wonder how much O2 we absorb through our skin compared to how much we absorb through our lungs. You can suffocate if you paint yourself in a non breathable membrane right?


We absorb very very little oxygen through the skin, not enough to make any kind of difference whatsoever, otherwise we couldn't take baths, sit in hottubs or go swimming. Also I think Mythbusters busted this
 
2012-06-28 01:31:32 AM

Bondith: That's beside the point. The buildup of CO2 in the bloodstream is what causes the urge to breathe. As long as your cells are still working, you're going to have carbon dioxide, and you're going to want to breathe.


Dead bodies can burp and sigh days after dying. This leads me to think that some expelling of gasses does still happen even if the lungs aren't pumping air in and out.
 
2012-06-28 01:39:40 AM
Ambivalence: Dang, now I wonder how much O2 we absorb through our skin compared to how much we absorb through our lungs. You can suffocate if you paint yourself in a non breathable membrane right?

Myth busted

BUT, a non breathable membrane would probably reduce your ability to cool off.
 
2012-06-28 01:43:06 AM
TheMadDefenestrator: Also I think Mythbusters busted this

And how

img.chan4chan.com
 
2012-06-28 01:44:41 AM

Ambivalence: You can suffocate if you paint yourself in a non breathable membrane right?


No.
 
2012-06-28 01:46:39 AM

TheMadDefenestrator: We absorb very very little oxygen through the skin, not enough to make any kind of difference whatsoever, otherwise we couldn't take baths, sit in hottubs or go swimming. Also I think Mythbusters busted this


I had not realized this. Water usually has dissolved O2, that's why fish can breath in it.
 
2012-06-28 01:51:09 AM

Ambivalence: TheMadDefenestrator: We absorb very very little oxygen through the skin, not enough to make any kind of difference whatsoever, otherwise we couldn't take baths, sit in hottubs or go swimming. Also I think Mythbusters busted this

I had not realized this. Water usually has dissolved O2, that's why fish can breath in it.


No offense, but im guessing you didnt do so well in high school biology?
 
2012-06-28 02:08:16 AM
What the F*ck that is some crazy shizzle
 
2012-06-28 02:31:05 AM

MurphyMurphy: So I inject this into a lifeless body.

Then I hook a pacemaker type device up to force blood circulation.

Possibly might need to hook a 3rd device up to the brain to stimulate... stuff. With science.

And viola! Zombies.


Damn you! Now I know how to make a nanobot zombie. The real question is if we can harness them for positive economic productivity. Unfortunately they'll probably breakout in the R&D phase.
 
2012-06-28 03:40:50 AM
Ambivalence
I had not realized this. Water usually has dissolved O2, that's why fish can breath in it.

One of my chem profs once did the math once on a bottle of water that claimed to be enhanced with added O2. It turned out to contain the same amount of oxygen as breathing twice...not a whole lot, plus it would be delivered to the stomach, which is not an organ designed for gas exchange.

Dead bodies can burp and sigh days after dying. This leads me to think that some expelling of gasses does still happen even if the lungs aren't pumping air in and out.

Yes, it's the decay products building up and leaking out from internal pressure. I'm not sure what point you're trying to make with this.
 
2012-06-28 03:42:20 AM

Bondith: That's beside the point. The buildup of CO2 in the bloodstream is what causes the urge to breathe. As long as your cells are still working, you're going to have carbon dioxide, and you're going to want to breathe.


The intended use is to temporarily make breathing unnecessary during critical moments when the doctors are working on you. You are almost certainly unconcious, very likely sedated, and probably unable to breathe anyway when you are given this. And the body isn't likely to build up toxic levels of CO2 in the 10 minutes or so you'd be on this.
 
2012-06-28 04:08:39 AM

Bondith: Ambivalence
I had not realized this. Water usually has dissolved O2, that's why fish can breath in it.

One of my chem profs once did the math once on a bottle of water that claimed to be enhanced with added O2. It turned out to contain the same amount of oxygen as breathing twice...not a whole lot, plus it would be delivered to the stomach, which is not an organ designed for gas exchange.

Dead bodies can burp and sigh days after dying. This leads me to think that some expelling of gasses does still happen even if the lungs aren't pumping air in and out.

Yes, it's the decay products building up and leaking out from internal pressure. I'm not sure what point you're trying to make with this.


A fundamental lack of knowledge/understanding of basic biology?
 
2012-06-28 04:17:23 AM
aerojockey
The intended use is to temporarily make breathing unnecessary during critical moments when the doctors are working on you. You are almost certainly unconcious, very likely sedated, and probably unable to breathe anyway when you are given this. And the body isn't likely to build up toxic levels of CO2 in the 10 minutes or so you'd be on this.

Ahhh. I refused to click the shiatty link, so I didn't get the whole story.

It's not a matter of toxic levels, it's a matter of threshold levels. If there is more than x concentration of CO2 in the bloodstream, the medulla oblongata will make the lungs work even if you're asleep or unconscious - otherwise we'd all die the first time we took a nap. Now...do the anesthetics they use during surgery supress this activity? I actually don't know - if they do, (and that mask they put over your face does artificial respiration as well), then we have something useful with this invention.
 
2012-06-28 04:20:01 AM

ArcadianRefugee: Can someone post a link to the actual article/information and not some lame Gawker shiat?


You mean the link Gawker sites supply at the bottom of every sourced article?

/today's example of irony: biatching about news aggregators on a forum for a news aggregator.
 
2012-06-28 04:28:51 AM

Bondith: aerojockey
The intended use is to temporarily make breathing unnecessary during critical moments when the doctors are working on you. You are almost certainly unconcious, very likely sedated, and probably unable to breathe anyway when you are given this. And the body isn't likely to build up toxic levels of CO2 in the 10 minutes or so you'd be on this.

Ahhh. I refused to click the shiatty link, so I didn't get the whole story.

It's not a matter of toxic levels, it's a matter of threshold levels. If there is more than x concentration of CO2 in the bloodstream, the medulla oblongata will make the lungs work even if you're asleep or unconscious - otherwise we'd all die the first time we took a nap. Now...do the anesthetics they use during surgery supress this activity? I actually don't know - if they do, (and that mask they put over your face does artificial respiration as well), then we have something useful with this invention.


You're right, this invention is completely useless! Why don't those doctors look these things up first! Oh well, back to the drawing board...those idiots.
 
2012-06-28 04:35:57 AM

devildog123: So, how do you test for this? It's the next level of blood doping. One quick injection before the race and -poof- you have 3-4 times the oxygen content of your own blood cells, and the only residue left sounds like slightly elevated lipid levels. And you know that long before this winds up in hospitals and on ambulances, it will wind up in some swimmer or cyclist's blood doping bag.


I get the impression that a single shot won't last too long, though I could be wrong. But with regards to cycling, if a single shot lasts up to 20-30 minutes, what events could be won with that help? Velodrome events? Races aren't won in the first 15 min, they are won in the last lap, or last minutes. I think the effects are too short term to be too much of a cheating risk. Besides, getting an injection *RIGHT* before a race is pretty sketch, he'd have to shoot up and go straight to the starting line. His routine would have to be reg, warm-up, number pinning, injection, rll up to the line.

\hmmm, maybe an ITT or TTT?
 
2012-06-28 04:37:19 AM
So they got around to inventing tri-ox compound eh? Yet another Star Trek item for the list.
 
2012-06-28 04:41:49 AM

Jaap_null: Bondith: aerojockey
The intended use is to temporarily make breathing unnecessary during critical moments when the doctors are working on you. You are almost certainly unconcious, very likely sedated, and probably unable to breathe anyway when you are given this. And the body isn't likely to build up toxic levels of CO2 in the 10 minutes or so you'd be on this.

Ahhh. I refused to click the shiatty link, so I didn't get the whole story.

It's not a matter of toxic levels, it's a matter of threshold levels. If there is more than x concentration of CO2 in the bloodstream, the medulla oblongata will make the lungs work even if you're asleep or unconscious - otherwise we'd all die the first time we took a nap. Now...do the anesthetics they use during surgery supress this activity? I actually don't know - if they do, (and that mask they put over your face does artificial respiration as well), then we have something useful with this invention.

You're right, this invention is completely useless! Why don't those doctors look these things up first! Oh well, back to the drawing board...those idiots.


Ha! Take that scientists! The internet has emerged victorious once again.

/magnets
 
2012-06-28 05:07:02 AM

turbidum: ArcadianRefugee: Can someone post a link to the actual article/information and not some lame Gawker shiat?

You mean the link Gawker sites supply at the bottom of every sourced article?

/today's example of irony: biatching about news aggregators on a forum for a news aggregator.


Yes, that. But since I won't click on a Gawker link to begin with....

/that's the point of my asking
//Fark is a news aggregator; Gawker is just vomiting someone else's work repacked as one's own
 
2012-06-28 06:56:51 AM
www.dailyscubadiving.com

also,

will allow medical teams to keep patients alive and well for 15 to 30 minutes despite major respiratory failure

this is indeed big
 
2012-06-28 07:19:49 AM
Will it be available in gum form?

i49.tinypic.com
 
2012-06-28 08:51:07 AM
Can I play German Batball while on the blood enhancer?

rented a tent rented a tent rented a rented a rented a tent

/obscure?
 
2012-06-28 08:53:52 AM

HotWingAgenda: Our lungs have really shiatty membranes - they don't absorb that well.


They're not shiatty, they're designed to exchange CO2 and O2 from the blood without spewing platelets, lymph, plasma, dissolved nutrients and water into the atmosphere.
 
2012-06-28 09:12:24 AM

ArcadianRefugee: turbidum: ArcadianRefugee: Can someone post a link to the actual article/information and not some lame Gawker shiat?

You mean the link Gawker sites supply at the bottom of every sourced article?

/today's example of irony: biatching about news aggregators on a forum for a news aggregator.

Yes, that. But since I won't click on a Gawker link to begin with....

/that's the point of my asking
//Fark is a news aggregator; Gawker is just vomiting someone else's work repacked as one's own


Just check PhysOrg

"When the trachea was completely blocked- a more dangerous "real world" scenario-the infusion kept the animals alive for 15 minutes without a single breath"
 
2012-06-28 09:24:14 AM
Some of the most convincing experiments were the early ones. We drew each other's blood, mixed it in a test tube with the microparticles, and watched blue blood turn immediately red, right before our eyes.

Really I don't believe blood is ever blue, that is a myth. And these people are doctors/scientists.
 
2012-06-28 09:28:03 AM

theorellior: HotWingAgenda: Our lungs have really shiatty membranes - they don't absorb that well.

They're not shiatty, they're designed to exchange CO2 and O2 from the blood without spewing platelets, lymph, plasma, dissolved nutrients and water into the atmosphere.


Evolved/adapted not designed.
 
2012-06-28 09:28:49 AM

Bondith:

That's beside the point. The buildup of CO2 in the bloodstream is what causes the urge to breathe. As long as your cells are still working, you're going to have carbon dioxide, and you're going to want to breathe.


It's the brain which initiates the reflex, not simply CO2 in the blood. It has to be present, blood circulating, and the brain functioning enough to trigger the response.

This is why the current CPR protocol focuses on compressions to get the blood moving and not breathing assistance.

Current recommendations place emphasis on high-quality chest compressions over artificial respiration; a simplified CPR method involving chest compressions only is recommended for untrained rescuers.
 
2012-06-28 09:36:42 AM

American Decency Association: [www.dailyscubadiving.com image 400x174]

also,

will allow medical teams to keep patients alive and well for 15 to 30 minutes despite major respiratory failure

this is indeed big


I remember seeing breathing fluid in the '60s sci-fi series "UFO" and further real-sci examples of it showing mice dunked into an oxygenated fluid and breathing it and not drowning.

I can't imagine the terror of the sensation of drowning but not then losing consciousness with the viscosity of the fluid causing discomfort as it rushes by tissues not evolved for gas exchange between fluids on both sides of the membrane.
 
2012-06-28 09:42:21 AM
Is it weird that I'm thinking of the athletic benefits of this?
 
2012-06-28 09:52:40 AM

Ambivalence: Dang, now I wonder how much O2 we absorb through our skin compared to how much we absorb through our lungs.


Very, very little. Part of this is that we don't have enough surface area to exchange gases that way, and part of it is that our skin is too thick to absorb very much.

You can suffocate if you paint yourself in a non breathable membrane right?

No (at least, not unless you cover your nose and mouth in the same stuff). It can get pretty uncomfortable, but breathing provides more than enough oxygen to live on. Way more than enough, actually; it's not a terribly efficient process.
 
2012-06-28 09:54:47 AM

aerojockey: Bondith: That's beside the point. The buildup of CO2 in the bloodstream is what causes the urge to breathe. As long as your cells are still working, you're going to have carbon dioxide, and you're going to want to breathe.

The intended use is to temporarily make breathing unnecessary during critical moments when the doctors are working on you. You are almost certainly unconcious, very likely sedated, and probably unable to breathe anyway when you are given this. And the body isn't likely to build up toxic levels of CO2 in the 10 minutes or so you'd be on this.


All the same, when people hear the phrase "live without breathing," they tend to think of something a little more permanent than 10-15 minutes.
 
2012-06-28 09:55:43 AM

lohphat: American Decency Association: [www.dailyscubadiving.com image 400x174]
I remember seeing breathing fluid in the '60s sci-fi series "UFO" and further real-sci examples of it showing mice dunked into an oxygenated fluid and breathing it and not drowning.

I can't imagine the terror of the sensation of drowning but not then losing consciousness with the viscosity of the fluid causing discomfort as it rushes by tissues not evolved for gas exchange between fluids on both sides of the membrane.


I have the UFO series on DVD, but I don't recall them using oxygenated fluid. Must've missed that one.

I see it a little more like Fireball XL5, where the characters did not use pressure suits, but "oxygen pills" to facilitate breathing where there was no air. But the producers neglected to consider the lack of pressure or warmth. Still....puppet shows rule!

Oxygen pills....whooda thunkit....?
 
2012-06-28 09:56:52 AM

Boatmech: ArcadianRefugee: turbidum: ArcadianRefugee: Can someone post a link to the actual article/information and not some lame Gawker shiat?

You mean the link Gawker sites supply at the bottom of every sourced article?

/today's example of irony: biatching about news aggregators on a forum for a news aggregator.

Yes, that. But since I won't click on a Gawker link to begin with....

/that's the point of my asking
//Fark is a news aggregator; Gawker is just vomiting someone else's work repacked as one's own

Just check PhysOrg

"When the trachea was completely blocked- a more dangerous "real world" scenario-the infusion kept the animals alive for 15 minutes without a single breath"


Seems like something like this could be a safer alternative to an epipen for a first aid kit. I mean, you dont want to haphazardly be injecting someone with epinephrine in an allergy emergency if this will keep the person alive until the paramedics get there. Plus something like this could also be used in a choking situation.
 
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