If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   Scientists continue to be divided over whether a double amputee would have an "unfair advantage" competing against able-bodied sprinters in the Olympics   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 180
    More: Asinine, International Association of Athletics Federations, Court of Arbitration for Sport, Paralympic Games, Southern Methodist, athleticism, lower leg, Oscar Pistorius, Pretoria  
•       •       •

6491 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jun 2012 at 7:41 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



180 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-06-27 04:38:26 PM
Some day really soon this is going to be a real issue.

img685.imageshack.us
 
2012-06-27 04:40:16 PM
That's not nice. The double amputee will continue to be divided permanently.
 
2012-06-27 04:47:22 PM
Are you saying they have a leg up on the competition?
 
2012-06-27 04:48:11 PM
Uhhhhhhh duh. He's not running on his legs. Wearing those things make you go much faster.
 
2012-06-27 04:50:23 PM
Scientists continue to be divided over whether a double amputee cyborg with hyper-legs would have an "unfair advantage" competing against able-bodied sprinters in the Olympics.

/Would neuropazine be a performance-enhancing drug?
 
2012-06-27 04:54:28 PM

Walker: Uhhhhhhh duh. He's not running on his legs. Wearing those things make you go much faster.


will extreme athletes gold for the gold and get their feet cut off??
bwhahahahahahahaha

do they need to handicap the runners so that they are all the same weight?
:D
 
2012-06-27 05:48:08 PM
I've often wondered if children of Thalidomide have an advantage in swimming events.
 
2012-06-27 07:02:58 PM

I_C_Weener: I've often wondered if children of Thalidomide have an advantage in swimming events.


I know you are being silly, but on some level that question highlights just how weird this whole "performance enhancing" question really is. I used to swim pretty fast but most of my speed came from the fact that I have nigh-mutant feet (13EEEE) why is a genetic advantage okay but a chemical or material advantage not? Will that answer change when genetics has advanced to the point that we can custom build our offspring?
 
2012-06-27 07:41:48 PM
borgdotcom.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-06-27 07:42:54 PM

usernameguy: Scientists continue to be divided over whether a double amputee cyborg with hyper-legs would have an "unfair advantage" competing against able-bodied sprinters in the Olympics.


Yeah, this.
 
2012-06-27 07:50:40 PM
Little Tink Tink.
 
2012-06-27 07:51:39 PM

Magorn: Will that answer change when genetics has advanced to the point that we can custom build our offspring?


I think that people (as a whole) will generally eschew the idea of genetically building offspring. The technology will be there, but something about that idea will just be too weird and creepy to really catch on. I'm not saying it will never happen, but I don't see it becoming "normal" or at least generally acceptable anytime in the near future.
 
2012-06-27 07:52:10 PM
Can't we just give them this? They already lose their feet, throw them a bone.
 
2012-06-27 07:52:52 PM
JC Denton unavailable for comment.
 
2012-06-27 07:54:48 PM
The only debate in this is the definition of "fair".

Is it fair that some people are born with a genetic advantage? Should we have the Handicapper General weigh down the competitors in such a way that they all have a perfectly equal chance of winning and the only variations will come down to random quantum chance?
 
2012-06-27 07:54:57 PM
I see their point. Still, I would never want to be the guy in charge of b*tching about an amputee having an unfair advantage.
 
2012-06-27 07:55:01 PM
Tough question.
I'm stumped.
 
2012-06-27 07:55:11 PM

ongbok
Little Tink Tink.


Game Over, we has winner
 
2012-06-27 07:56:16 PM

Thisbymaster: Can't we just give them this? They already lose their feet, throw them a bone.


Two fibulas if it isn't too much trouble.
 
2012-06-27 07:56:33 PM

Donnchadha: Magorn: Will that answer change when genetics has advanced to the point that we can custom build our offspring?

I think that people (as a whole) will generally eschew the idea of genetically building offspring. The technology will be there, but something about that idea will just be too weird and creepy to really catch on. I'm not saying it will never happen, but I don't see it becoming "normal" or at least generally acceptable anytime in the near future.


Creepy Idea? sure. Will people shy away from it? Hardly. Look at those crazy ass parents botoxing thier kids, taking them to tanning booths and talking about surgicilly enhancing them before puberty.

If they had a chance to have designer babies they would jump on that chance in a minute.
 
2012-06-27 07:58:21 PM

usernameguy: Scientists continue to be divided over whether a double amputee cyborg with hyper-legs would have an "unfair advantage" competing against able-bodied sprinters in the Olympics.


www.battlereports.com

"Really now, deep down, I just want to be held at night."
 
2012-06-27 07:58:30 PM
He never asked for this.
 
2012-06-27 07:58:57 PM

All2morrowsparTs: Donnchadha: Magorn: Will that answer change when genetics has advanced to the point that we can custom build our offspring?

I think that people (as a whole) will generally eschew the idea of genetically building offspring. The technology will be there, but something about that idea will just be too weird and creepy to really catch on. I'm not saying it will never happen, but I don't see it becoming "normal" or at least generally acceptable anytime in the near future.

Creepy Idea? sure. Will people shy away from it? Hardly. Look at those crazy ass parents botoxing thier kids, taking them to tanning booths and talking about surgicilly enhancing them before puberty.

If they had a chance to have designer babies they would jump on that chance in a minute.


This. People would kill for the chance to customize their kid.
 
2012-06-27 08:00:19 PM

JesseL: The only debate in this is the definition of "fair".

Is it fair that some people are born with a genetic advantage? Should we have the Handicapper General weigh down the competitors in such a way that they all have a perfectly equal chance of winning and the only variations will come down to random quantum chance?


I see it the other way, if you want to let people with enhanced prostectics compete with abled bodied persons then why not let bicyclists compete in track races too. I mean a bicycle can be consided a prostetic as well.
 
2012-06-27 08:01:11 PM
Is subby serious? The super techno legs are a huge farking advantage. You know you can't start farking with legless people anyways. You fark them and it's fine, but then they get on top. And when a legless person is on top they want to act all hot and shiat and have their hands in the air doing Dee's sexy little inflatable arm flailing tube man thing. But then they realize that they have to put their hands down to ride that dick with any sort of balance. So you concede and are like fark it, this biatch has a Gladiator van and one of these outlet store hospital beds with the creepy haunting banister thing above it. So she starts holding on to that shiat and you realize that those nubs are farking gross and you don't want to have her grinding like some sort of perverse weeble wobble, but you know, you can't just leave them hanging.
 
2012-06-27 08:03:21 PM
"Will man, who lost arm and replaced it with crane, participate in Snatch and Clean?"
"Will man with spring feet participate in high jump?"
"Will man with arm cannon participate in shot-put?"

All this and more.
 
2012-06-27 08:03:40 PM

yelmrog: All2morrowsparTs: Donnchadha: Magorn: Will that answer change when genetics has advanced to the point that we can custom build our offspring?

I think that people (as a whole) will generally eschew the idea of genetically building offspring. The technology will be there, but something about that idea will just be too weird and creepy to really catch on. I'm not saying it will never happen, but I don't see it becoming "normal" or at least generally acceptable anytime in the near future.

Creepy Idea? sure. Will people shy away from it? Hardly. Look at those crazy ass parents botoxing thier kids, taking them to tanning booths and talking about surgicilly enhancing them before puberty.

If they had a chance to have designer babies they would jump on that chance in a minute.

This. People would kill for the chance to customize their kid.


It's pretty easy to customize your kid. If you want a loser, get a ginger pregnant and keep the kid if it comes out translucent and spotted. If you want a serial killer, just make him blow the dog when he pisses the bed. I'm not sure how to customize your child into good things but it's a start.
 
2012-06-27 08:05:40 PM
If we have separate men's and women's events then obviously people with these prosthetics should be in a separate class of competition.

There's no logical way to distinguish between this and letting the Six Million Dollar Man compete. Usain Bolt can sprint at perhaps 30MPH. Col. Steve Austin's nuclear-powered bionic legs can sustain 60MPH, so if he existed he'd beat everyone except other bionic people.
 
2012-06-27 08:09:54 PM

I_C_Weener: I've often wondered if children of Thalidomide have an advantage in swimming events.


Let's ask Bob.
 
2012-06-27 08:10:34 PM

Nem Wan: If we have separate men's and women's events then obviously people with these prosthetics should be in a separate class of competition.

There's no logical way to distinguish between this and letting the Six Million Dollar Man compete. Usain Bolt can sprint at perhaps 30MPH. Col. Steve Austin's nuclear-powered bionic legs can sustain 60MPH, so if he existed he'd beat everyone except other bionic people.


I would support Team Cyborg USA
 
2012-06-27 08:12:07 PM
It's a slippery slope. Allowing an amputee to use prosthetic limbs is only a short step away from allow wily animals to use rocket skates.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-06-27 08:13:31 PM

Lonewolf45100: JC Denton unavailable for comment.


But Diana Moon Glampers will happily give you a comment, you just won't remember it due to the claxon horns in your ear.
 
xcv
2012-06-27 08:14:28 PM

Donnchadha: Magorn: Will that answer change when genetics has advanced to the point that we can custom build our offspring?

I think that people (as a whole) will generally eschew the idea of genetically building offspring. The technology will be there, but something about that idea will just be too weird and creepy to really catch on. I'm not saying it will never happen, but I don't see it becoming "normal" or at least generally acceptable anytime in the near future.


It's going to happen, with a generation of super-boys out of Asia first, Indian parents giving birth to sons with perfect recall, 7' tall Chinese with all sorts of endangered species genes grafted into their DNA to give them an edge on the basketball court and university entrance tests. South Korea might act all, holier than thou Christian ethics and reject the science at first but wait till they see the ability to raise their mouse-click speeds with a few chromosome tweaks. And the Japanese will be outright horrifying as they fully morph into real-life anime characters.

America will have to follow suit out of necessity or we'll never win another spelling bee or video game tournament again and eventually be conquered by mecha piloted by tweens.
 
2012-06-27 08:17:31 PM

I_C_Weener: I've often wondered if children of Thalidomide have an advantage in swimming events.


I loled.

/window seat please
 
2012-06-27 08:19:04 PM

AMonkey'sUncle: I_C_Weener: I've often wondered if children of Thalidomide have an advantage in swimming events.

Let's ask Bob.


Do they still swim in lines or circles? I think we could work with small circles.
 
2012-06-27 08:20:51 PM
F1 versus Stock Car
 
2012-06-27 08:21:50 PM

xcv:
It's going to happen, with a generation of super-boys out of Asia first, Indian parents giving birth to sons with perfect recall, 7' tall Chinese with all sorts of endangered species genes grafted into their DNA to give them an edge on the basketball court and university entrance tests. South Korea might act all, holier than thou Christian ethics and reject the science at first but wait till they see the ability to raise their mouse-click speeds with a few chromosome tweaks. And the Japanese will be outright horrifying as they fully morph into real-life anime characters.

America will have to follow suit out of necessity or we'll never win another spelling bee or video game tournament again and eventually be conquered by mecha piloted by tweens.


I predict that future America will be where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average
 
2012-06-27 08:23:53 PM
I think if the guy competed, and won, his victory wouldn't be accepted by the majority of the populace. They would say it was due to the prosthetics, and any competent but not quite world class athlete could duplicate the feet given the right hardware.
 
2012-06-27 08:24:08 PM

Lonewolf45100: JC Denton unavailable for comment.


What a shame.
 
2012-06-27 08:24:32 PM
I can easily see why this is debated. From an empirical point of view, replacing some muscle with highly efficient springs would be a nightmare to evaluate for relative performance. There is no way to establish a real control. Unless they use a calorimeter or something.
 
2012-06-27 08:25:27 PM
The title is completing misleading (what else is new on Fark?). This is not about whether double-amputees have an advantage over able-bodied people (they do not), this is about whether it's fair to have someone with a performance-enhancing prosthetic compete with those who don't.

Here are the facts:
1. These prosthetics are clearly performance-enhancing. They were designed specifically for running and nothing else (e.g. impossible to climb mountains, walk in mud, plenty of other things that generic doctor-prescribed leg prosthetics are able to do).
2. Science was eventually going to reach this point, where a person with a targeted prosthesis could outperform a human in an isolated skill; science will also inevitably surpass this point (but I doubt with this man or this particular set of legs, as he's struggling just to reach qualifying time).
3. As others have pointed out, once you open the floodgates (though I'm sure they'll be closed in no time once people realize how stupid it is), you open the door to all sorts of shenanigans. Runners on stilts. Amputees on bicycles. Most obvious to me is a double-amputee with spring-loaded prostheses for high jumps; no more (or less) of an advantage than this guy.

TL;DR: Completely unfair.
 
2012-06-27 08:25:52 PM
Here come the Super-special Olympics.

Cybernetic sprinters

Weightlifters who eat 'roids like Cheerios

Genetically modified swimmers with gills

Biathalon competitors with shoulder-mounted guns and targeting computers in their brains.
 
2012-06-27 08:26:19 PM
Tommorow: man in wheelchair discriminated against, not allowed to compete in run against able bodied persons

....and then you find out it was a power chair.

Being a double amputee sucks, but the special legs do make guys faster. Presumably this is against people with only one missing leg or missing arms or something, but you get the idea.
 
2012-06-27 08:28:56 PM
There's the possibility he will be allowed to compete because it's a guarantee it will generate ridiculous ratings, revenue and press, and because banning the guy without letting him compete makes him a martyr.

They may let him compete. Then the credibility of the Olympics will be called into question and then they will reluctantly ban it, now that the world has seen proof that the prosthetic creates an unfair advantage.
 
2012-06-27 08:31:13 PM

eggrolls: Here come the Super-special Olympics.

Cybernetic sprinters

Weightlifters who eat 'roids like Cheerios

Genetically modified swimmers with gills

Biathalon competitors with shoulder-mounted guns and targeting computers in their brains.


So you mean like the Olympics?
 
2012-06-27 08:31:37 PM
Can the able-bodied use those special shoes too?

I'll just call them special shoes.

I'm going to pitch in the majors,
using a Chuck-it.
 
2012-06-27 08:32:14 PM

JesseL: The only debate in this is the definition of "fair".

Is it fair that some people are born with a genetic advantage? Should we have the Handicapper General weigh down the competitors in such a way that they all have a perfectly equal chance of winning and the only variations will come down to random quantum chance?


Diana Moon Glampers nods and agrees
 
2012-06-27 08:34:28 PM
A double amputee is allowed to enter a race provided that he's running on his stumps, possibly covering his stumps with some sort of traction and cushioning material (also known as a shoe) that is available for any other competitor in the race. If other competitors cannot wear or use the shoe this amputee uses, then it would not allowed. That's how the ruling should be.
 
2012-06-27 08:34:49 PM

eggrolls: Here come the Super-special Olympics.

Cybernetic sprinters

Weightlifters who eat 'roids like Cheerios

Genetically modified swimmers with gills

Biathalon competitors with shoulder-mounted guns and targeting computers in their brains.


It will be more like composite white blood cells that allow us to sprint full speed for 10 minutes at a time or swim the 400 IM on 3 breaths, and it's MUCH closer to reality than most realize.

/the singularity is near
//we're all gonna be "cyborgs" in 35 years, tops
 
2012-06-27 08:35:24 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Nem Wan: If we have separate men's and women's events then obviously people with these prosthetics should be in a separate class of competition.

There's no logical way to distinguish between this and letting the Six Million Dollar Man compete. Usain Bolt can sprint at perhaps 30MPH. Col. Steve Austin's nuclear-powered bionic legs can sustain 60MPH, so if he existed he'd beat everyone except other bionic people.

I would support Team Cyborg USA


Honestly, I'd be pretty interested in seeing "unlimited class" (no enhancements prohibited) athletic competitions - it'd definitely spur on a lot of medical and prosthetic research and development that would probably also be very useful for people with injuries, ailments, and general physical problems (if someone develops a mysostatin inhibitor to promote muscle growth, that might also be useful to combat sarcopenia in the elderly, for example).

/"Go, go, Gadget [bodypart]!"
 
Displayed 50 of 180 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report