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(Neatorama)   6 obscure cartoon characters you've probably never heard of. Probably   (neatorama.com) divider line 61
    More: Interesting, type stars, Chuck Jones, Looney Tunes, Merrie Melodies, Tiny Toons  
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10645 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Jun 2012 at 12:03 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-27 11:37:40 AM
Anyone who watched Tiny Toons knows who Bosko and Honey are.


So, pretty much everyone who would read this article.
 
2012-06-27 11:39:28 AM
i291.photobucket.com

Slowpoke Rodriguez is the best cameo cartoon character.
 
2012-06-27 12:10:04 PM
Why did every old cartoon have stereotypical island black people in it? Complete with blackface exaggerated features?

Honestly, they make an appearance in like every single one.
 
2012-06-27 12:10:30 PM
data.whicdn.com
 
2012-06-27 12:20:22 PM
came for Courageous Cat...leaving disappointed.
img2-2.timeinc.net
 
2012-06-27 12:21:10 PM

sure haven't: Why did every old cartoon have stereotypical island black people in it? Complete with blackface exaggerated features?

Honestly, they make an appearance in like every single one.


That sort of thing was popular in the Vaudeville shows that preceded animation (and film in general) as the big popular entertainment in the US, and animators were trying to tap into that audience.
 
2012-06-27 12:22:02 PM
SNAFU is an acronym, not an anagram.
 
2012-06-27 12:23:01 PM
The Private SNAFU cartoons sound entertaining. I may have to look them up on YouTube when I get home.
 
2012-06-27 12:31:52 PM
I remember they used to show Bosko shorts in Loony Tunes, back in the late '80s/early '90s.
 
2012-06-27 12:32:34 PM

Millennium: sure haven't: Why did every old cartoon have stereotypical island black people in it? Complete with blackface exaggerated features?

Honestly, they make an appearance in like every single one.

That sort of thing was popular in the Vaudeville shows that preceded animation (and film in general) as the big popular entertainment in the US, and animators were trying to tap into that audience.


That, plus the fact that the cartoons were made in the 40s and early 50s when such shenanigans were not frowned upon.
 
2012-06-27 12:33:24 PM
images.wikia.com

Beans the Cat
 
2012-06-27 12:34:00 PM
Can anyone really get hipster cred by being a fan of a cartoon character no one else has ever heard of?
 
2012-06-27 12:35:09 PM

Mugato: Can anyone really get hipster cred by being a fan of a cartoon character no one else has ever heard of?


Works for bands.
 
2012-06-27 12:35:43 PM
He is not obsure but I was thinking about him yesterday:

www.catquotes.com

I wonder if the show has aged well?
 
2012-06-27 12:42:42 PM
Meh, not really that obscure. If you REALLY want obscure, there's Farty McFart and Oui-Oui the Penis, the two cartoon characters my fifth-grade friend and I created and drew on the long bus rides to and from school. We were about 20 years ahead of our time. Had we come up with this in the late '90s rather than the late '70s, I think there's a good chance Seth McFarlane would have optioned some of our "The Adventures of Farty McFart and Oui-Oui the Penis" scripts, and I'd be retired and living on an island somewhere.
 
2012-06-27 12:42:43 PM
Those are obscure? Only of you were born after 1990 or so, I guess.
 
2012-06-27 12:57:30 PM

Ambitwistor: SNAFU is an acronym, not an anagram.


And Inki was hunting an elusive prey, not an illusive prey. Unless he had been smoking PCP and was hunting imaginary elephants.
 
2012-06-27 12:58:43 PM

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Meh, not really that obscure. If you REALLY want obscure, there's Farty McFart and Oui-Oui the Penis, the two cartoon characters my fifth-grade friend and I created and drew on the long bus rides to and from school. We were about 20 years ahead of our time. Had we come up with this in the late '90s rather than the late '70s, I think there's a good chance Seth McFarlane would have optioned some of our "The Adventures of Farty McFart and Oui-Oui the Penis" scripts, and I'd be retired and living on an island somewhere.


That sounds like more of a project for John Kricfalusi, or maybe Ralph Bakshi.
 
2012-06-27 01:00:49 PM

Mugato: Can anyone really get hipster cred by being a fan of a cartoon character no one else has ever heard of?

I was into racist cartoons way before they were popular.
 
2012-06-27 01:04:07 PM

hillbillypharmacist: [i291.photobucket.com image 320x240]

Slowpoke Rodriguez is the best cameo cartoon character.


Michigan J. Frog would like a word.
 
2012-06-27 01:09:46 PM

Zap_Rowsdower: Mugato: Can anyone really get hipster cred by being a fan of a cartoon character no one else has ever heard of?

I was into racist cartoons way before after they were popular.


FTFY
 
2012-06-27 01:21:17 PM

dillengest: Zap_Rowsdower: Mugato: Can anyone really get hipster cred by being a fan of a cartoon character no one else has ever heard of?

I was into racist cartoons way before after they were popular.

FTFY


You never know, he could be 80. Err...90?
 
2012-06-27 01:21:27 PM

sure haven't: Why did every old cartoon have stereotypical island black people in it? Complete with blackface exaggerated features?

Honestly, they make an appearance in like every single one.


because white people look JUST like Popeye and Elmer Fudd...only black folks were ever drawn in caricature .
 
2012-06-27 01:35:42 PM

Fish in a Barrel: The Private SNAFU cartoons sound entertaining. I may have to look them up on YouTube when I get home.


This is probably the most popular of those.
 
2012-06-27 01:57:35 PM

Fish in a Barrel: The Private SNAFU cartoons sound entertaining. I may have to look them up on YouTube when I get home.


There's many WWII era cartoons done by the biggest names and studios in cartooning, Some of them are plain propaganda, some are instructional for incoming soldiers, all of them are awesome to watch as Americana history.
 
2012-06-27 02:05:39 PM
the local christian tv station plays some old movies and i've seen 'daffy the commando'[daffy duck vs nazi's] a few times on it. they also have shown private snafu toons and one sambo type cartoon and plenty of betty boops. the betty boops are pretty tame but iirc one of them shows her titties for a few seconds and a shadow in a frilly grown hints like it is really her bush.
 
2012-06-27 02:07:03 PM

King Something: Millennium: sure haven't: Why did every old cartoon have stereotypical island black people in it? Complete with blackface exaggerated features?

Honestly, they make an appearance in like every single one.

That sort of thing was popular in the Vaudeville shows that preceded animation (and film in general) as the big popular entertainment in the US, and animators were trying to tap into that audience.

That, plus the fact that the cartoons were made in the 40s and early 50s when such shenanigans were not frowned upon.


True, but I think we're going on different definitions of why. I'm talking about where it came from; you're talking about what made using it possible.
 
2012-06-27 02:08:43 PM

Ambitwistor: SNAFU is an acronym, not an anagram.


It's an anagram of FAUNS. Or U.S. FAN. Or ANUS F.
 
2012-06-27 02:20:22 PM
Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs

[thatsracist.jpg]

It sure is.
 
2012-06-27 02:53:50 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Anyone who watched Tiny Toons knows who Bosko and Honey are.


So, pretty much everyone who would read this article.


Yep, It took me a second to think of where it was from, but I figured out Tiny Toons before I scrolled down.

Gunny Highway: He is not obsure but I was thinking about him yesterday:

[www.catquotes.com image 245x289]

I wonder if the show has aged well?


Heh, I was thinking about that show a month ago, I couldn't remember the bobcats name, just that it was partnered up with Marsupalami
 
2012-06-27 03:37:46 PM
It matters on how old you are. Before the cartoons were banned etc...
 
2012-06-27 03:57:40 PM

Burr: Heh, I was thinking about that show a month ago, I couldn't remember the bobcats name, just that it was partnered up with Marsupalami


Bonkers. He is totally nuts.
 
2012-06-27 04:04:48 PM

Burr: FirstNationalBastard: Anyone who watched Tiny Toons knows who Bosko and Honey are.


So, pretty much everyone who would read this article.

Yep, It took me a second to think of where it was from, but I figured out Tiny Toons before I scrolled down.



I always mistake the episode for an episode of Animaniacs.

Of course, Animaniacs was based on retconning old, forgotten characters into the Looney Tunes universe, and the look of the Warner Brothers (and Warner Sister) seem to be based on the redesigned Bosko and Honey.
 
2012-06-27 04:05:38 PM

rev. dave: It matters on how old you are. Before the cartoons were banned etc...


If you run in White Supremacist circles...
 
2012-06-27 04:19:06 PM
As a WB fan, I would like to see every WB Loony Tunes and Merry Melody cartoon ever made. There isn't one of these six "obscure" characters who is unknown to me because I am a WB cartoon maven, nerd, and collector.

I have a guide to the cartoons in which I mark off the cartoons as I see them. I have seen between 500 and 600 thus far, out of a possible total of around 1,500 (estimate).

Bosko and Honey were the original stars of the WB line up. Foxy is a rip-off of Disney's Micky Mouse. Buddy a typical egg-headed goon from the 1920s and early 30s. Flip the Frog is one of many animal characters that have roots in folklore (think Brer Rabbit and the W. Burgess Tales), while Private SNAFU was the star of the WB wartime propaganda cartoons and thus once familiar to millions of American troops and movie goers.

As for Inki, he is one of many racially and ethnically politically incorrect characters of various degrees of crudeness and absurdity. He is perhaps the hardest to find character because the stereotypes are far more vulgar and unsympathetic than more popular and sophisticated caracatures such as Speedy Gonzalez, who is something of a traditional Culture Hero and thus acceptible to many Mexicans.

The WB artists were not intentionaly offensive, but they shared the cultural stereotypes of their time and exploited them mercilessly for humour and satire. They parodied popular culture freely (something which the newest television cartoons have taken up again--unlike the earlier, less successful and less funny attempts to revive and continue the franchise) and blackface was still a part of popular culture. Many stereotypes are, in any case, short hand designed to make characters instantly recognizable, and when the gags flow naturally and sympathetically, even a stereotype is hard to hate if the dominant or popular characters are likewise mocked--Bugs Bunny is generally an equal or an undergod with his nemesis--the hunters, the bigwigs, the hostile locals, etc--thus he goes up against pirates (Yosemite Sam), bigwigs (Napoleon, Kings, Sultans), and hostile natives who range from aborigines to hillbillies to the US Armed Forces and Washington, DC.

You can see many of these old "forbidden" cartoons among the extras on recent WB collections. The best of these (because the most complete) is the six volume Loony Tunes Golden Collection (there is a less complete Spotlight collection also--watch out for it if you are a completist like myself, as you will be disappointed to get less than every thing you can). Rather than complete this collection, WB has re-packaged the same cartoons and a few others in other collections. The Platinum Collection (Volume 1 thus far) isn't bad but has a lot of redundant material if you have the Golden Collection. It does have a lot of worthwhile new to DVD and Bluray material, though, and I don't regret buying it. There are several character based collections on one DVD. Some of these have been fairly well-received but others have nothing new to completists and old fans. Do your research if you have to have the best of the best or everything you can get your hands on.

You can watch a lot of stuff on Google's Youtube and even more on Google Videos. Remember that Google already had a lot of free video before it bought YouTube.

http://www.google.com/videohp

I don't much care for most of the material which features these early characters--it was nothing like the classic, beautiful drawn and written art of the theatrical and television cartoon classics, but I like to watch them any way whenever I can find new material because I'd like to see everything WB made.

Loony Tunes and Merry Melodies, as the names suggested, were made to sell sheet music, so the cartoons have a very special sound as well.

Some of the newer TV shows are good. Have you seen Daffy Duck in a parody of Samurai Jack? If not, you have missed one of the new classics.

WB never sank as low as many of the great cartoons of the 1920s-1950s sank when they were done in minimal animation for children and TV by idiots and bean-counting hacks, but some of the mid-history cartoons aren't nearly as good as the old classics and the new revivals. Mel Blanc, for example, was a genius, but his voice was going towards the end of his life and he doesn't sound like himself sometimes. A shame, but that is the way of all voices.
 
2012-06-27 04:37:08 PM

Millennium: sure haven't: Why did every old cartoon have stereotypical island black people in it? Complete with blackface exaggerated features?

Honestly, they make an appearance in like every single one.

That sort of thing was popular in the Vaudeville shows that preceded animation (and film in general) as the big popular entertainment in the US, and animators were trying to tap into that audience.


This is a question for psychologists, sociologists, cultural studies scholars and historians, but part of the answer is that America went through a series of fads during the history of film.

The early days saw a lot of cartoons and movies made for the Southern Market. These were white-washed or revisionist histories and melodramas set in the Old South, with Southern heros and heroines, an idealized and romanticized view of southern society, and villains from the "Yankee" or "Carpet-bagging" North.

Since the first movies were made by Edison in the North, but quickly movied to California, there was a large Southern contigent among the movie makers and a large Southern market which was serviced with as much cynicism and opportunism as any other Hollywood market.

This was followed by a displacement of the vulgar and racist cultural stereotypes overseas--to Africa naturally, but also towards the South Seas. This followed the Philappines occupation and was heightened by World War II, during which American troops were stationed in the South Pacific and elsewhere around the world.

This is the period that gave the world John Carter of Mars and Tarzan (Edgar Rice Burroughs' Southern Romanticism can be seen even in the recent 3-D movie). It also gave us Porky Pig in Wackyland (the motto "It can happen here" is a parody of Sinclair Lewis' novel of the rise of fascism in 1930s America, entitled It Can't Happen Here.

The 1930s also saw the rise of monster movies such as The Mummy (influenced the discoveries of another Carter in Egypt in the 1920s, as well as the nineteenth and twentieth century vogue for the mysteries of Egypt) and Zombie movies, which were based on Southern US and Haitian voodoo.

To make a long story short, the cartoons and other popular entertainments reflected America's long and troubled history with race, as well as attempts to deal with it through humour and fantasy.

Books have been written on the subject, but really all you have to do is watch a lot of old cartoons, listen to old radio, and watch old movies and television and you can watch as America gradually comes to grip with the amount of melanin in the skin cells of a large minority of its citizens, not to mention the rest of the world.

The WB cartoons were far from the worst. They were made by intelligent and talented people who were given an exceptionally free hand to do as they please. This is the main reason why they are so good, and the main reason they aren't much worse when they aren't good.

Many of the people in the cartooning industry were mavericks, free-thinkers and Jews, working for money-grubbing SOBs and studeo tyrants. They naturally resisted their masters and mocked them, creating some of the best entertainment ever in any medium.

Hurrah for the heroes who had the courage and the wit to give Hollywood and the rest of America a good boot to the side of the head not once in a while, but continuously over decades of work.

Their subversion made our relatively sophisticated and gentle politically correct world possible. You should see the crap that didn't survive this revolution! Nothing in any cartoon is as horrible as the popular entertainment that it mocks. Well, almost nothing. Cartoons are a naturally subversive and fantastical medium. They make the impossible possible. They do the things we dream of doing, as a pop song put it.

Even the humble editorial cartoonist often seems to have prophetic powers. I have a book of cartoons about art (a catalog of an exhibition of art cartoons) and you would not believe the number of times the cartoonists anticipated artisitic developments decades later while trying to mock the artists of their day.
 
2012-06-27 04:40:05 PM
"Cartoon Heroes", lyrics (Aqua)


We are what we're supposed to be
Illusions of your fantasy
All dots and lines that speak and say
What we do is what you wish to do

We are the color symphony
We do the things you wanna see
Frame by frame, to the extreme

Our friends are so unreasonable
They do the unpredictable
All dots and lines that speak and say
What we do is what you wish to do

It's all an orchestra of strings
Doin' unbelievable things
Frame by frame, to the extreme
One by one, we're makin' it fun

We are the Cartoon Heroes - oh-oh-oh
We are the ones who're gonna last forever
We came out of a crazy mind - oh-oh-oh
And walked out on a piece of paper

Here comes Spiderman, arachnophobian
Welcome to the toon town party
Here comes Superman, from never-neverland
Welcome to the toon town party

We learned to run at speed of light
And to fall down from any height
It's true, but just remember that
What we do is what you just can't do

And all the worlds of craziness
A bunch of stars that's chasing us
Frame by frame, to the extreme
One by one, we're makin' it fun

We are the Cartoon Heroes - oh-oh-oh
We are the ones who're gonna last forever
We came out of a crazy mind - oh-oh-oh
And walked out on a piece of paper

Here comes Spiderman, arachnophobian
Welcome to the toon town party
Here comes Superman, from never-neverland
Welcome to the toon town party

You think we're so mysterious
Don't take us all too serious
Be original, and remember that
What we do is what you just can't do

What we do is what you just can't do
What we do is what you just can't do
What we do is what you just can't do
What we do is what you just can't do

We are the Cartoon Heroes - oh-oh-oh
We are the ones who're gonna last forever
We came out of a crazy mind - oh-oh-oh
And walked out on a piece of paper

There's still more to come
And everyone will be
Welcomed at the
Toon - Toon
Town - Town
Party
 
2012-06-27 04:53:14 PM

Stratohead: came for Courageous Cat...leaving disappointed.
[img2-2.timeinc.net image 270x220]


I use to love watching him. Completely forgot about him until now though. Going to have to go searching for some of those.
 
2012-06-27 04:59:14 PM
I had 3/6. Nobody ever knows of The Yellow Kid when I mention him.
 
2012-06-27 05:06:47 PM
Of course we haven't heard of them. Their 100 years old, in the public domain, and full of humor and characterizations from other time that many today would find offensive. No one has a vested interest in putting them in front of fresh eyeballs.
 
2012-06-27 05:19:23 PM

brantgoose: As a WB fan, I would like to see every WB Loony Tunes and Merry Melody cartoon ever made. There isn't one of these six "obscure" characters who is unknown to me because I am a WB cartoon maven, nerd, and collector.

I have a guide to the cartoons in which I mark off the cartoons as I see them. I have seen between 500 and 600 thus far, out of a possible total of around 1,500 (estimate).


Dude, you must get all SORTS of poontang.

/Well, I am reading this thread.
/I'm married with twin toddlers, so I'm not either...
 
2012-06-27 05:37:37 PM
Inki FTW!
 
2012-06-27 05:38:34 PM

brantgoose: The early days saw a lot of cartoons and movies made for the Southern Market. These were white-washed or revisionist histories and melodramas set in the Old South, with Southern heros and heroines, an idealized and romanticized view of southern society, and villains from the "Yankee" or "Carpet-bagging" North.


I don't know that there was much thought of "Southern" market or any other specialized market in those days. The kind of portrayals we're talking about were prevalent throughout the popular entertainment. To imply that this kind of thing was made to target a southern audience whitewashes, if you will, the culture in the USA at the time. The whole southern revisionist-romantic thing was popular everywhere. The movement is, I think, generally connected to the "nadir of American race relations" from the late 1870s through the early 1900s (1901 to the 1940s, depending on who you ask).

Blackface is an older thing that was, again, popular throughout the USA from the mid-1800s all the way to the late 1950's/early 1960's (I was a bit taken aback a couple of years ago to find a "Minstrel Show" page in my father's high school yearbook from 1955). It was there from minstrel shows to vaudeville to Al Jolson to cartoons and movies. The blackface archetype would have been instantly recognizable to most any person in those days and they probably (if they were white, anyway) didn't think a thing of it. It's nice to see that we've at least come far enough that those images are jarring to us today.
 
2012-06-27 05:45:43 PM

brantgoose: "Cartoon Heroes", lyrics (Aqua)


We are what we're supposed to be
Illusions of your fantasy
All dots and lines that speak and say
What we do is what you wish to do

We are the color symphony
We do the things you wanna see
Frame by frame, to the extreme

Our friends are so unreasonable
They do the unpredictable
All dots and lines that speak and say
What we do is what you wish to do

It's all an orchestra of strings
Doin' unbelievable things
Frame by frame, to the extreme
One by one, we're makin' it fun

We are the Cartoon Heroes - oh-oh-oh
We are the ones who're gonna last forever
We came out of a crazy mind - oh-oh-oh
And walked out on a piece of paper

Here comes Spiderman, arachnophobian
Welcome to the toon town party
Here comes Superman, from never-neverland
Welcome to the toon town party

We learned to run at speed of light
And to fall down from any height
It's true, but just remember that
What we do is what you just can't do

And all the worlds of craziness
A bunch of stars that's chasing us
Frame by frame, to the extreme
One by one, we're makin' it fun

We are the Cartoon Heroes - oh-oh-oh
We are the ones who're gonna last forever
We came out of a crazy mind - oh-oh-oh
And walked out on a piece of paper

Here comes Spiderman, arachnophobian
Welcome to the toon town party
Here comes Superman, from never-neverland
Welcome to the toon town party

You think we're so mysterious
Don't take us all too serious
Be original, and remember that
What we do is what you just can't do

What we do is what you just can't do
What we do is what you just can't do
What we do is what you just can't do
What we do is what you just can't do

We are the Cartoon Heroes - oh-oh-oh
We are the ones who're gonna last forever
We came out of a crazy mind - oh-oh-oh
And walked out on a piece of paper

There's still more to come
And everyone will be
Welcomed at the
Toon - Toon
Town - Town
Party


I love you, this made my day. Have you listened to their new album yet (Megalomania)? 'Playmate to Jesus', 'Like a Robot', and 'How R U Doin?' are their best new tracks.
 
2012-06-27 05:51:22 PM

S.A.S.Q.U.A.T.C.H.: I had 3/6. Nobody ever knows of The Yellow Kid when I mention him.


I do... but I studied cartoons/cartooning for 20 years.

xtalman: Stratohead: came for Courageous Cat...leaving disappointed.
[img2-2.timeinc.net image 270x220]

I use to love watching him. Completely forgot about him until now though. Going to have to go searching for some of those.


its pretty weak animation really... but I enjoyed it when I was 4. it was created by Bob Kane actually.

side note: I walked into a store called "Toon Store" a loooong time ago... they sold animation cels, lithos etc...and was told " We carry all kinds of characters...name anything" so I offered up Courageous Cat in an attempt to throw them... they had T-shirts... I had that thing until if finally fell apart a few years ago.
 
2012-06-27 06:01:03 PM
Pretty sure I seen them all
 
2012-06-27 06:03:58 PM

Fish in a Barrel: The Private SNAFU cartoons sound entertaining. I may have to look them up on YouTube when I get home.


didn't look on youtube but there are some available on the prelinger archives :
Link
 
2012-06-27 06:41:27 PM
I didn't think Flip the Frog was that obscure. I just thought that the cartoons were awful.
 
2012-06-27 07:23:41 PM
6 obscure cartoon characters you've probably never heard of unless you've ever watched a "Classic Cartoons" video you bought at the supermarket for $1.99.
 
2012-06-27 07:50:38 PM
I knew who Bosko, Buddy, and Private SNAFU were.
 
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