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(Sun Sentinel)   Police officer quits after texting a tip about an upcoming SWAT raid   (sun-sentinel.com) divider line 49
    More: Florida, SWAT team, plantations, police officers, habitual offender, legal burden of proof, texting, Florida Attorney General  
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10465 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jun 2012 at 12:41 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-27 09:33:55 AM
They call out the motherf*cking SWAT team so grown men can play soldier. Then this:

"The suspect turned himself in to Plantation police the next day."

And the police wonder why they're increasingly alienated from the citizenry they're supposed to serve.
 
2012-06-27 09:35:50 AM
and the cop lost his job???
why isnt he in prison??????
 
2012-06-27 09:40:18 AM

namatad: and the cop lost his job???
why isnt he in prison??????


Yeah, but I'm told if he screws up ONE MORE TIME, he's going to be in some BIG TROUBLE, MISTER.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-06-27 10:41:18 AM

namatad: and the cop lost his job???
why isnt he in prison??????


Well, funny thing about prisons. You generally can't just throw people in them, you have to have a trial and a conviction and lots of silly formalities like that.

Seriously though, TFA actually says "In reality he didn't tip anybody off to anything but because he engaged in communications, there were inferences that existed," said Edwards' attorney, Mike Dutko. "Even the most staunch critics would have to acknowledge there's nothing he did to compromise any investigation because the guy surrendered himself."

So, it looks like they don't have grounds for criminal charges, but they do have enough to fire him.
 
2012-06-27 10:41:53 AM
So they didn't get to play hardcore army men?
 
2012-06-27 11:46:02 AM
img854.imageshack.us

It's OK when they do it.
 
2012-06-27 12:45:55 PM

Babwa Wawa: namatad: and the cop lost his job???
why isnt he in prison??????

Yeah, but I'm told if he screws up ONE MORE TIME, he's going to be in some BIG TROUBLE, MISTER.


That's the 'ol "Cop has a clean record" excuse. So, nothing goes on his record. Then, the next time he gets in trouble, he doesn't get punished because he has a clean record...and so on..and so on
 
2012-06-27 12:47:12 PM
OK, SWAT is coming out now.
 
2012-06-27 12:48:45 PM
OK, kicking in door now.

Pimp and FBI CI

blastmagazine.com
I've seen this movie.
 
2012-06-27 12:49:13 PM
He sent him "insightful" messages? I need new friends all of their texts are either stupid or unnecessary. Someone who texted me insightful things might help me make a better person out of myself.
 
2012-06-27 12:49:41 PM
Babwa and Namatad, did you guys even read the article?
 
2012-06-27 12:50:04 PM

ScotterOtter: Babwa Wawa: namatad: and the cop lost his job???
why isnt he in prison??????

Yeah, but I'm told if he screws up ONE MORE TIME, he's going to be in some BIG TROUBLE, MISTER.

That's the 'ol "Cop has a clean record" excuse. So, nothing goes on his record. Then, the next time he gets in trouble, he doesn't get punished because he has a clean record...and so on..and so on


I think some folks need to re-read the article.
 
2012-06-27 12:50:06 PM
I've been wrong, I guess sometimes the cops do help people.
 
2012-06-27 12:53:12 PM
oi42.tinypic.com
 
2012-06-27 12:53:23 PM
FTA: Because of the man's training in martial arts and nine felony convictions from 1993 to 2000, Plantation police decided to use the SWAT team to arrest him on several charges, including sexual battery, according to the report.

And he's the informant? It's nice to see our corrupt cops dealing with such sh1isacks.

to quote W.O.W.: "A pig is a pig and that's that!"
 
2012-06-27 12:53:50 PM
Delete your info from his phone? They work out together? Was he a roid supplier?
 
2012-06-27 12:53:55 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-06-27 12:53:59 PM
Of all the reasons for LEOs to not give their friends inside info, "they might be FBI informants" would've never crossed my mind.
 
2012-06-27 12:54:23 PM

Smackledorfer: Babwa and Namatad, did you guys even read the article?

 
2012-06-27 12:54:31 PM
Paid administrative leave (paid vacation) and then granted him immunity for obstruction?

/must be nice to be a cop
 
2012-06-27 12:54:57 PM

namatad: and the cop lost his job???
why isnt he in prison??????


Im sure he still gets a taxpayer funded pension too.
 
2012-06-27 12:55:08 PM

Smackledorfer: Babwa and Namatad, did you guys even read the article?


media.tumblr.com
 
2012-06-27 12:58:43 PM
One rule for cops and one rule for everyone else.

How sweet. Cops want to know what he did, he says give me immunity and I'll tell you. How about YOU INVESTIGATE EVIDENCE OF WRONGDOING?

Cops got the evidence of his texts from subpoena but how nice of them to have already given him immunity already.

I hate 99% of cops.
 
2012-06-27 12:59:38 PM

PsyLord: Paid administrative leave (paid vacation) and then granted him immunity for obstruction?

/must be nice to be a cop


rta
 
2012-06-27 01:12:22 PM

Smackledorfer: Babwa and Namatad, did you guys even read the article?


Smackledorfer and SDRR, do you understand humor when you read it? How could you read a sentence that ends with the word "mister" in caps and conclude it was anything but sarcasm?
 
2012-06-27 01:15:20 PM
So cop recruiters are still using IQ tests the opposite way that normal recruiters use them, I see.
 
2012-06-27 01:21:05 PM
If he does it again he will get a letter of reprimand in his file!
 
2012-06-27 01:34:19 PM
What I gleaned from the article, and the google search was follows :

1.)The cop was really really close friends with the informant. They spent lots of time together, trained together, practiced martial arts together.

2.)He didn't actually tip the guy off by saying SWATS COMING DUDE. He just said ARE YOU KEEPING CLEAN?
which, may or may not have been code words. It's unknown what was said on the phone call. It's harder to convince someone by saying "I think he said this." as opposed to "I know he said this because we had it tapped.".

3.)The cop was offered IMMUNITY to tell the story on what happened. Cop told. Cop resigned. No crime.

4.)The informant turned himself in. He was an informant, informants are a double edged sword. You ignore some crimes in exchange for more juice on other people.

Looks to me like the situation was, cops were keeping a pet informant and covering for him. Informant still had bad behavior but it was paying off in arresting of other bad guys. A boss decided they were going to arrest the informant. Not only arrest, but send in an armed swat team.
Got to the point where they took the two guys off who were close to the informant because they were so close to him. Conflict of interests.

Someone made a call the officers didn't agree with. One of the officers was loyal or cared for the informant.

Crime or no crime, informant operations is always a grey area bordering on entrapment.
The cop didn't want his friend taken down by swat because he might have been shot or killed.

Not sure why the FBI wasn't doing the arrest and the LOCAL swat was.
It seems like it's a FED vs STATE pissing contest. You know them ol' rub one out power struggles.
Either way, it looks like it was heavily political.
 
2012-06-27 01:42:24 PM
"Edwards, 30, won't face prosecution because the State Attorney's Office offered him immunity in exchange for explaining what had happened...Edwards, who had been with the department for five years, was placed on administrative leave with pay on Jan. 12 while Internal Affairs investigated. He resigned April 24." - TFA

So basically he won't go to jail or be in any trouble at all and got a paid vacation for 3 1/2 months.

/assumes that is how I would be treated in a similar situation right?
 
2012-06-27 01:49:59 PM

Babwa Wawa: Smackledorfer: Babwa and Namatad, did you guys even read the article?

Smackledorfer and SDRR, do you understand humor when you read it? How could you read a sentence that ends with the word "mister" in caps and conclude it was anything but sarcasm?


I don't think you understand why you need to rtfa. Maybe if you read it you'll find out. Your Weeners was the retarded one.

rta
 
2012-06-27 02:04:36 PM
Came for The Shield reference.

/leaving disappointed
 
2012-06-27 02:06:38 PM
This happened very recently in Dallas too. Only the one in Dallas tipped off the subject of the raid and didn't exactly turn himself in.
Link
 
2012-06-27 02:07:22 PM

Smackledorfer: I don't think you understand why you need to rtfa. Maybe if you read it you'll find out. Your Weeners was the retarded one.


I have. In fact, I read before I posted. And I've since re-read it, and I'll stand by what I wrote up top. You don't need to send in an armed SWAT team to nab a confidential informant with whom law enforcement is in regular contact. That's how people get hurt. You just grab him during a regular meet-up.

This is all supported by the fact that the dude came in on his own the next f*cking day.

Of course, if the chief uses common sense when he goes about leveraging his SWAT team, it's harder for him to justify all the stupid f*cking gear and training he wastes building up his own little platoon so he can play army men.
 
2012-06-27 02:08:11 PM
I like how they are keeping the CI's identity secret, but in the same article we learn:
He works out at the American Top Team gym
He has had multiple felony arrests
Edwards is his martial arts coach
He's friends with Courtney

I tell you, the guy's a GHOST.
 
2012-06-27 02:14:23 PM

Babwa Wawa: Smackledorfer: I don't think you understand why you need to rtfa. Maybe if you read it you'll find out. Your Weeners was the retarded one.

I have. In fact, I read before I posted. And I've since re-read it, and I'll stand by what I wrote up top. You don't need to send in an armed SWAT team to nab a confidential informant with whom law enforcement is in regular contact. That's how people get hurt. You just grab him during a regular meet-up.

This is all supported by the fact that the dude came in on his own the next f*cking day.

Of course, if the chief uses common sense when he goes about leveraging his SWAT team, it's harder for him to justify all the stupid f*cking gear and training he wastes building up his own little platoon so he can play army men.


Do you believe the SWAT team should exist at all?

If so, do you believe those officers wouldn't be costing the city the exact same amount of money if they stayed home that day? Given that obviously they would still be costing the city the same amount whether they were used in that kind of op or not, what is the big deal with using them to serve warrants on dangerous criminals? Did I miss some part of the article where it states that there was a bigger thing going on across town and everybody died because the SWAT team was wasting its time with this guy?

You use the word "play" a lot. Playing around is exactly what they AREN'T doing when they take a threat seriously and move with more than the minimum level of force required.
 
2012-06-27 02:25:04 PM

namatad: and the cop lost his job???
why isnt he in prison??????


He was given immunity in exchange for an explanation.

Babwa Wawa: Smackledorfer: I don't think you understand why you need to rtfa. Maybe if you read it you'll find out. Your Weeners was the retarded one.

I have. In fact, I read before I posted. And I've since re-read it, and I'll stand by what I wrote up top. You don't need to send in an armed SWAT team to nab a confidential informant with whom law enforcement is in regular contact. That's how people get hurt. You just grab him during a regular meet-up.

This is all supported by the fact that the dude came in on his own the next f*cking day.

Of course, if the chief uses common sense when he goes about leveraging his SWAT team, it's harder for him to justify all the stupid f*cking gear and training he wastes building up his own little platoon so he can play army men.


Yeah, it sounds like the chief has a case of swinging .
 
2012-06-27 02:26:38 PM

Kanemano: OK, kicking in door now.

Pimp and FBI CI


I've seen this movie.


$
 
2012-06-27 02:35:50 PM
Immunity for explaining what happened? That is the sweetest deal ever! You should all be happy for him. Haters.
 
2012-06-27 02:50:56 PM

Smackledorfer: PsyLord: Paid administrative leave (paid vacation) and then granted him immunity for obstruction?

/must be nice to be a cop

rta


I did. He was told not to use his cell. He did... to contact the suspect thereby obstructing the arrest of the suspect. He was then given immunity for the explanation of his action, which was obstruction. And yes, he did get paid administrative leave, which is basically a paid vacation, while IA was doing their investigation.
 
2012-06-27 02:55:30 PM
"If I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend I hope I should have the guts to betray my country." -E.M. Foster

/Props for being a true friend, no matter what the other guy did
 
2012-06-27 02:56:19 PM

Smackledorfer: Do you believe the SWAT team should exist at all?


Sure, they should exist to the extent necessary for them to meet the needs of the community.

Smackledorfer: Given that obviously they would still be costing the city the same amount whether they were used in that kind of op or not


You clearly don't understand the composition of most SWAT teams. In all but the largest cities, SWAT members are just beat and patrol officers with some extra training in special weapons and tactics. So using them in situations where they are not needed is a waste of resources on a number of levels. Smaller towns will share a SWAT capability with other towns, but they're still comprised of beat cops.

Smackledorfer: what is the big deal with using them to serve warrants on dangerous criminals?


First, this is not a dangerous criminal. He's a f*cking CI - you can nab him quietly any damned time and place you please.

Second, this is the problem with inappropriate use of SWAT teams:

i.imgur.com
source
 
2012-06-27 03:16:36 PM

CruiserTwelve: I think some folks need to re-read the article.


What did I get wrong about the article? You really think the the SWAT team is needed to grab a CI they're in regular contact with? Especially considering the dude turned himself in the next day anyway?
 
2012-06-27 04:11:30 PM

Smackledorfer: Do you believe the SWAT team should exist at all?

If so, do you believe those officers wouldn't be costing the city the exact same amount of money if they stayed home that day? Given that obviously they would still be costing the city the same amount whether they were used in that kind of op or not, what is the big deal with using them to serve warrants on dangerous criminals? Did I miss some part of the article where it states that there was a bigger thing going on across town and everybody died because the SWAT team was wasting its time with this guy?

You use the word "play" a lot. Playing around is exactly what they AREN'T doing when they take a threat seriously and move with more than the minimum level of force required.


How about that they were fully intending to bring military style force to corral a suspect they called up and just asked to come in the next day, and he complied?

When is it EVER the legal or morally ethically thing to do to exercise force indiscriminately, when simpler safer methods haven't been exhausted?
 
2012-06-27 04:54:25 PM

Babwa Wawa: You clearly don't understand the composition of most SWAT teams. In all but the largest cities, SWAT members are just beat and patrol officers with some extra training in special weapons and tactics. So using them in situations where they are not needed is a waste of resources on a number of levels. Smaller towns will share a SWAT capability with other towns, but they're still comprised of beat cops


Do you have a citation for this SWAT team, since it is so clear that I don't know shiat about SWAT teams?
But ok, so the cops should have been out doing what, then? Writing traffic tickets? Is that more important than going after a dangerous suspect with superior numbers and training?

I know you don't seem to believe criminals are dangerous, or at least this particular multiple felon, but it appears that the cops did. I'd rather let the police apprehending people decide whether they want an extra man with them than have them make a phone call to Babwa Wawa. I'm willing to bet they didn't call you, and in fact you can see in the article that they articulated their reasoning: he was a trained martial artist and multiple felon.

Babwa Wawa: First, this is not a dangerous criminal. He's a f*cking CI - you can nab him quietly any damned time and place you please.

Second, this is the problem with inappropriate use of SWAT teams:


I don't see how that map supports your argument here at all. Your argument was, and correct me if I'm wrong, that SWAT is the result of the chiefs playing soldier when a regular police operation should have been used. Your map offers no comparison between those two options. Some of the items marked on the map are examples of police actions taken that in retrospect shouldn't have been taken at all (grey and orange). The map and link to Cato are presented as an answer to a question I asked, but it doesn't address it at all.
 
2012-06-27 05:09:41 PM

Smackledorfer: Do you have a citation for this SWAT team, since it is so clear that I don't know shiat about SWAT teams?
But ok, so the cops should have been out doing what, then? Writing traffic tickets? Is that more important than going after a dangerous suspect with superior numbers and training?


I'll do it this once, but it's the last time I'll do your research for you.

The relative infrequency of SWAT call-outs means these expensively-trained and equipped officers cannot be left to sit around, waiting for an emergency. In many departments the officers are normally deployed to regular duties, but are available for SWAT calls via pagers, mobile phones or radio transceivers.

Smackledorfer: I know you don't seem to believe criminals are dangerous, or at least this particular multiple felon, but it appears that the cops did


No, the cops didn't think he's dangerous. If they thought he was dangerous, they wouldn't have him as a confidential informant.. CIs going haywire and farking people up doesn't play well in the media.

Smackledorfer: The map and link to Cato are presented as an answer to a question I asked, but it doesn't address it at all.


You asked:

"what is the big deal with using [SWAT] to serve warrants on dangerous criminals?"

The big deal is that the use of paramilitary force by law enforcement is risky (especially to innocents). You use it only when other circumstances with markedly reduced risk cannot be contrived.

In this case, the f*cker turned himself in. Even if they didn't think he would do it, being a CI means they had regular contact with him and could have brought him in under a variety of circumstances.

But as I said, when chiefs spend their limited resources on unnecessary paramilitary equipment, they're going to use it whether the circumstances dictate its use or not, and often regardless of whether the officers are adequately trained.
 
2012-06-27 05:10:05 PM
I bet the fact that he is related to many local Democratic political figures also had nothing to do with him being offered immunity.
 
2012-06-27 05:49:13 PM

vpb: Seriously though, TFA actually says "In reality he didn't tip anybody off to anything but because he engaged in communications, there were inferences that existed," said Edwards' attorney, Mike Dutko. "Even the most staunch critics would have to acknowledge there's nothing he did to compromise any investigation because the guy surrendered himself."

So, it looks like they don't have grounds for criminal charges, but they do have enough to fire him.


Yet if he had been a civilian who had texted the tip, they would have had more than sufficient grounds for criminal charges, whether or not any officers were put at risk.

His penalty shouldn't be the same as a member of the general public. He should get worse, because he's trained and trusted to know better.
 
2012-06-27 06:19:52 PM

Babwa Wawa: The big deal is that the use of paramilitary force by law enforcement is risky (especially to innocents). You use it only when other circumstances with markedly reduced risk cannot be contrived.


The map and link didn't show that. It showed no comparison between similar circumstances without swat and the results, nor did it show the percentage within swat operations in which problems arose.

Babwa Wawa: If they thought he was dangerous, they wouldn't have him as a confidential informant


You should be a police officer. Nobody is dangerous and you would be so awesome you'd never need backup.
 
2012-06-27 06:37:20 PM

Smackledorfer: The map and link didn't show that. It showed no comparison between similar circumstances without swat and the results, nor did it show the percentage within swat operations in which problems arose.

I don't know why I'm arguing with someone who's dense enough to ask questions whose answers can be found on wikipedia, but anyway.

The title of the link says "botched paramilitary police raids". "Paramilitary police" means "SWAT". If you have other data that you would like to introduce to the discussion, please do. Or you can just continue to fling your own poo - who cares?

Smackledorfer: You should be a police officer. Nobody is dangerous and you would be so awesome you'd never need backup.


I'm starting to get annoyed at you to the point of just putting you on ignore. If you want to have a discussion, I'm up for it. But you've got to stop deliberately misquoting me and misrepresenting my position. I was very. f*cking. clear. in my last post that SWAT has a role in law enforcement. But it's overused, and the situation in the article is a perfect example. Because he was a CI, the police had access to him without paramilitary means, and was going to use it anyway. The evidence confirming this is that he went to the police on his own volition when the raid never happened.

If you'd like to educate yourself on the subject of the rapid rise of paramilitary policing over the last 40 years, go read one of the many books on the subject.
 
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