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(Marketwatch)   A+B+C=X. If X is less than the cost of retirement, we don't get to retire   (marketwatch.com) divider line 29
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2397 clicks; posted to Business » on 27 Jun 2012 at 9:18 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-27 09:24:56 AM
How much does a cyanide pill cost, anyway?
 
2012-06-27 09:29:18 AM
Are there a lot of these situations around?
You wouldn't believe.
 
2012-06-27 09:30:51 AM
1. 25 years
2. 18 years
3. Yes
4. 4%
5. 60%
6. half a million.more or less
7.
 
2012-06-27 09:31:26 AM
Huh?

7. Less than 20% chance of failure
 
2012-06-27 09:31:48 AM
That bit about the "how long will I spend in retirement?" seemed overly complicated.

Look up in your family tree. How old were your grands when they started to all die. That'll give you a ballpark figure. The women in my families die in their 60's and 70's, but the men make it to 90. Although I'd go for a long drive off a mountainside before I lived as my grandfathers did in the end.
 
2012-06-27 09:34:33 AM

wildcardjack: That bit about the "how long will I spend in retirement?" seemed overly complicated.

Look up in your family tree. How old were your grands when they started to all die. That'll give you a ballpark figure. The women in my families die in their 60's and 70's, but the men make it to 90. Although I'd go for a long drive off a mountainside before I lived as my grandfathers did in the end.


It's the opposite in my family. We should hook up and become a Howard Family.
 
2012-06-27 09:37:29 AM
Don't worry, the government will handle all that for you. Live for the present.
 
2012-06-27 09:38:17 AM

Wendolyn the Wired: It's the opposite in my family. We should hook up and become a Howard Family.


If you qualified I'm sure we would have contacted you by now

Lazarus
 
2012-06-27 09:51:18 AM
I'm saving for retirement, but I doubt I'll actually retire.
 
2012-06-27 10:00:43 AM

verbaltoxin: I'm saving for retirement, but I doubt I'll actually retire.


Same here. The men on my father's side of the family typically all die around 50. The men on my mom's side usually kick off in their 80's. Sometimes I wonder why I'm not spending that 15K a year and enjoying it, instead of saving for something I'll never enjoy. Oh well, I guess someone will get a nice inheritance in about 25 years.
 
2012-06-27 10:05:50 AM
Retirement is for people who want to die. Mr. Eugenides father retired at 80, and now in his very late eighties he does light work around the house. Like roofing, removing and replacing the concrete sidewalk and insulating and drywalling his garage. I figure he's got another 20 years in him.

Meanwhile, I see folks retire at 60 to "go fishing" who go to pot and die within a decade.

Me, I'm going to work 'til I'm dead.
 
2012-06-27 10:19:53 AM
My wife's grandmothers are 92 and 102. The 92-year-old is in worse shape, but she's also been hit by a car and so can't walk.

Her mother has never taken a sick day from work.

My retirement planning has to involve my wife living forever, in other words.
 
2012-06-27 10:21:32 AM

verbaltoxin: I'm saving for retirement, but I doubt I'll actually retire.


dchurch0: Same here. The men on my father's side of the family typically all die around 50.


Er, I think the prevailing thought isn't that we won't make it to retirement age, but that we'll never have the money.
 
2012-06-27 10:24:47 AM

dragonchild: verbaltoxin: I'm saving for retirement, but I doubt I'll actually retire.

dchurch0: Same here. The men on my father's side of the family typically all die around 50.

Er, I think the prevailing thought isn't that we won't make it to retirement age, but that we'll never have the money.


Yeah, one of my grandfathers smoked and died of heart trouble that would be much less of a problem today, and the other is coming up on 90.

But I fully expect to work until I'm 85.
 
2012-06-27 10:33:25 AM
I'm an American. I don't do math.
 
2012-06-27 10:43:03 AM

YixilTesiphon: My wife's grandmothers are 92 and 102. The 92-year-old is in worse shape, but she's also been hit by a car and so can't walk.

Her mother has never taken a sick day from work.

My retirement planning has to involve my wife living forever, in other words.


Murder-suicide solves most financial and guilt related problems.
 
2012-06-27 11:07:44 AM

Rapmaster2000: I'm an American. I don't do math.


I do math.
I retired 12 years ago. I have more now than I had then so I guess I'm O.K.
 
2012-06-27 11:16:52 AM

wutchamacallem: Rapmaster2000: I'm an American. I don't do math.

I do math.
I retired 12 years ago. I have more now than I had then so I guess I'm O.K.


Ignore him; he's an engineer. He *IS* math.
 
2012-06-27 12:34:51 PM
Hedging my bets by planning to make money in some form my entire life. My grandmother was close to seventy before she died, and before cancer made her immobile, she was still selling quilts and pillows she made at a casino in a nearby town.

Never truly "retiring" from working also seems to be healthier, as most of what I've read suggests that a raison d'etre is common among centenarians, while those who stop working and "retire" report higher incidences of depression and earlier death.
 
2012-06-27 02:18:43 PM
I'll work damn near 'til I die. It helps that I love my career, and probably won't/can't have kids.

/here's an extra piece of coal for you, Bob. Enjoy your day off.
 
2012-06-27 02:25:06 PM
You know, I would dearly love to work out some of these equations for myself, but T Useless FA doesn't tell you what symbols they used to represent each value so you can't plug your own numbers in.

Yeah its great that these equations exist, but what am I supposed to do with them?
 
2012-06-27 03:35:47 PM

postnobills: You know, I would dearly love to work out some of these equations for myself, but T Useless FA doesn't tell you what symbols they used to represent each value so you can't plug your own numbers in.

Yeah its great that these equations exist, but what am I supposed to do with them?


Well, you could follow the link after the first item to the excel file that has all the equations in macro form.

/or you could shake your tiny fist in rage
 
2012-06-27 03:38:41 PM
You "work till you die" types are crazy. If I'm not retired by 55 I will shoot myself.

/I can think of 1000 places I would rather be than at work
 
2012-06-27 03:56:51 PM

umad: You "work till you die" types are crazy. If I'm not retired by 55 I will shoot myself.

/I can think of 1000 places I would rather be than at work


The 'work till you die' types are under 50 and happily naive about how things actually work in the world. Yes, those who do work to 80 are healthier and live longer. Typically, though, that more of a correlation. The only people getting to work that long are hobby-entrepreneurs and tenured college profs. Generally lower-stress jobs (getting to a tenured spot is certainly stressful now, but not so much 50 years ago).

For the other 90%? Fully half of American boomers born in 1950 will file for their Social Security check this year, the day they turn 62. Taking a diminished check for life as a result. That's because a full half of 62 year-olds are unemployed and have given up being reliably employed. Actually, 59 is the real tipping point in ageism. At 59, if you lose a job, you have a 50/50 chance of ever working another 40-hour-week again.

Looking forward to quitting when I can, and family history doesn't give me great odds of hitting 70.
 
2012-06-27 07:59:02 PM

Lawnchair: umad: You "work till you die" types are crazy. If I'm not retired by 55 I will shoot myself.

/I can think of 1000 places I would rather be than at work

The 'work till you die' types are under 50 and happily naive about how things actually work in the world. Yes, those who do work to 80 are healthier and live longer. Typically, though, that more of a correlation. The only people getting to work that long are hobby-entrepreneurs and tenured college profs. Generally lower-stress jobs (getting to a tenured spot is certainly stressful now, but not so much 50 years ago).

For the other 90%? Fully half of American boomers born in 1950 will file for their Social Security check this year, the day they turn 62. Taking a diminished check for life as a result. That's because a full half of 62 year-olds are unemployed and have given up being reliably employed. Actually, 59 is the real tipping point in ageism. At 59, if you lose a job, you have a 50/50 chance of ever working another 40-hour-week again.

Looking forward to quitting when I can, and family history doesn't give me great odds of hitting 70.


I'm 54. At this point, I am looking to cut back on hours sometime in the next few years. There are other fields and adventures I want to try. Will I have enough funds to go there? Not sure yet. We'll see.
 
2012-06-27 10:31:04 PM
So, Project Mayhem is the answer...
 
2012-06-28 12:58:28 AM

umad: You "work till you die" types are crazy. If I'm not retired by 55 I will shoot myself.

/I can think of 1000 places I would rather be than at work


I retired at 53, so I am getting a kick out of the replies. I can find a 1000 things to do other than going to work.
 
2012-06-28 04:39:41 AM
Which country do you work in?

A major one.
 
2012-06-28 08:26:51 AM
INCORRECT.

You change the monetary system and arrest the bankers and politicians responsible for it.

I would lump the MSM in there too. Sorry Drew, change your slant or you are going down too! Ha, that rhymes.

Neo-Nuremberg Trials!

What is the difference between starving someone or gassing them?
Answer: Gassing is a quicker death, and therefore more human.
 
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