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(Discover)   Astronaut playing with water in space: "This is fun." Water droplet to astronaut: "Get bent"   (blogs.discovermagazine.com) divider line 32
    More: Cool, electromagnetic forces, beam of light, surface tension, refraction, ISS, curvature, droplets, gravity  
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7851 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Jun 2012 at 4:42 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-26 04:43:54 PM
And the winner of the internet today is..... subby.


Well played.
 
2012-06-26 05:06:56 PM
That article reads like it was written by Bill Nye. (the science guy)
 
2012-06-26 05:11:21 PM
I wonder what Zero-G fire looks like.
 
2012-06-26 05:14:36 PM
That's totally shopped. I can see the pixels on my computer screen.
 
2012-06-26 05:15:23 PM

Smoking GNU: I wonder what Zero-G fire looks like.


sovietrussia.org
 
2012-06-26 05:19:00 PM
Haha subby has an enlarged humerus for knowing H2O molecules are 'bent' due to their valence shell electrons 118° apart, making water both adhesive (opposed to cohesive) and magnetic.

/6.022x1023; Avogadro's number
//not just a good idea; it's the (scientific) law
 
2012-06-26 05:24:06 PM

highendmighty: Smoking GNU: I wonder what Zero-G fire looks like.

[sovietrussia.org image 204x205]



I was thinking more like a combustible liquid in Zero-G on fire, what that'd look like. But i guess i'll never know, as that kind of thing is a no-no in any space mission.
 
2012-06-26 05:25:52 PM
Phil, you forgot that the correct presentation of that phrase is ...IN SPAAAAAAAACE!
 
2012-06-26 05:28:40 PM

Smoking GNU: I was thinking more like a combustible liquid in Zero-G on fire, what that'd look like. But i guess i'll never know, as that kind of thing is a no-no in any space mission.


Whatever you're thinking about -- or think you're thinking about -- doesn't really matter. Fire isn't a substance its a reaction. Fire doesn't exist by itself, it has to have something to oxidize (ah, re-dux high school chem). So different stuff burns at different temperatures, and different colors as well. (That's how fireworks are made; different chemicals or elements are added to fireworks so they burn different colors.)

Back to your question: it would look like whatever the shape of the gas that's being combusted looked like, in the presence of both a fire source and oxygen, because nothing can burn without oxygen. (Not to say explosives can't be made, but that's different from 'fire')
 
2012-06-26 05:34:04 PM

urban.derelict: Smoking GNU: I was thinking more like a combustible liquid in Zero-G on fire, what that'd look like. But i guess i'll never know, as that kind of thing is a no-no in any space mission.

Whatever you're thinking about -- or think you're thinking about -- doesn't really matter. Fire isn't a substance its a reaction. Fire doesn't exist by itself, it has to have something to oxidize (ah, re-dux high school chem). So different stuff burns at different temperatures, and different colors as well. (That's how fireworks are made; different chemicals or elements are added to fireworks so they burn different colors.)

Back to your question: it would look like whatever the shape of the gas that's being combusted looked like, in the presence of both a fire source and oxygen, because nothing can burn without oxygen. (Not to say explosives can't be made, but that's different from 'fire')


Lemme try this again:

Liquid combustible

Oxygen containing atmo

Zero gravity
 
2012-06-26 05:36:49 PM
What did this guy do, stuff Don Pettit into the airlock??
 
2012-06-26 05:38:47 PM

Smoking GNU: highendmighty: Smoking GNU: I wonder what Zero-G fire looks like.

[sovietrussia.org image 204x205]


I was thinking more like a combustible liquid in Zero-G on fire, what that'd look like. But i guess i'll never know, as that kind of thing is a no-no in any space mission.


Fire isn't as fierce in space as the movies would have you think. Microgravity means buoyancy doesn't work and thus convection doesn't happen. This leads to a boundary layer of flame where the fuel and oxygen meet. If you had a bubble of liquid fuel it would produce a similar boundary flame, but it would be interesting to see if the bubble heated as fast as evaporation cooled it. If evaporation cools the bubble then the fire goes out. If evaporation doesn't cool it then the bubble could boil.
 
2012-06-26 05:41:27 PM

wildcardjack: Smoking GNU: highendmighty: Smoking GNU: I wonder what Zero-G fire looks like.

[sovietrussia.org image 204x205]


I was thinking more like a combustible liquid in Zero-G on fire, what that'd look like. But i guess i'll never know, as that kind of thing is a no-no in any space mission.

Fire isn't as fierce in space as the movies would have you think. Microgravity means buoyancy doesn't work and thus convection doesn't happen. This leads to a boundary layer of flame where the fuel and oxygen meet. If you had a bubble of liquid fuel it would produce a similar boundary flame, but it would be interesting to see if the bubble heated as fast as evaporation cooled it. If evaporation cools the bubble then the fire goes out. If evaporation doesn't cool it then the bubble could boil.


That actually sounds like it would look awesome to watch, especially if it starts boiling.
 
2012-06-26 05:50:36 PM

Smoking GNU: wildcardjack: Smoking GNU: highendmighty: Smoking GNU: I wonder what Zero-G fire looks like.

[sovietrussia.org image 204x205]


I was thinking more like a combustible liquid in Zero-G on fire, what that'd look like. But i guess i'll never know, as that kind of thing is a no-no in any space mission.

Fire isn't as fierce in space as the movies would have you think. Microgravity means buoyancy doesn't work and thus convection doesn't happen. This leads to a boundary layer of flame where the fuel and oxygen meet. If you had a bubble of liquid fuel it would produce a similar boundary flame, but it would be interesting to see if the bubble heated as fast as evaporation cooled it. If evaporation cools the bubble then the fire goes out. If evaporation doesn't cool it then the bubble could boil.

That actually sounds like it would look awesome to watch, especially if it starts boiling.


Agreed. Off to find some sort of bubbling boiling space flame!
 
2012-06-26 05:56:20 PM

theorellior: Phil, you forgot that the correct presentation of that phrase is ...IN SPAAAAAAAACE!


Going to space going there can't wait gotta go. Space. Going.

Better get some water. Wanna see me. playin with water. Gonna be in space.
 
2012-06-26 06:59:28 PM
Don Pettit?

RTFA

Well, maybe next time.

/it's usually don pettit
 
2012-06-26 07:30:09 PM

urban.derelict: Haha subby has an enlarged humerus for knowing H2O molecules are 'bent' due to their valence shell electrons 118° apart, making water both adhesive (opposed to cohesive) and magnetic.

/6.022x1023; Avogadro's number
//not just a good idea; it's the (scientific) law


6.022x1023 only tastes good with mole.
 
2012-06-26 07:33:47 PM

highendmighty: Smoking GNU: wildcardjack: Smoking GNU: highendmighty: Smoking GNU: I wonder what Zero-G fire looks like.

[sovietrussia.org image 204x205]


I was thinking more like a combustible liquid in Zero-G on fire, what that'd look like. But i guess i'll never know, as that kind of thing is a no-no in any space mission.

Fire isn't as fierce in space as the movies would have you think. Microgravity means buoyancy doesn't work and thus convection doesn't happen. This leads to a boundary layer of flame where the fuel and oxygen meet. If you had a bubble of liquid fuel it would produce a similar boundary flame, but it would be interesting to see if the bubble heated as fast as evaporation cooled it. If evaporation cools the bubble then the fire goes out. If evaporation doesn't cool it then the bubble could boil.

That actually sounds like it would look awesome to watch, especially if it starts boiling.

Agreed. Off to find some sort of bubbling boiling space flame!


Among other things in this video, you can see a Mir crewmember flicking a lit match into free flight inside the spacecraft. YouTube
 
2012-06-26 07:35:39 PM
Hey, wallpaper, w00000ty!
 
2012-06-26 07:40:44 PM
Nice. I wonder if the glob of air is more likely to have/retain a more spherical shape than the water.
 
2012-06-26 08:01:43 PM

Smoking GNU: highendmighty: Smoking GNU: I wonder what Zero-G fire looks like.

[sovietrussia.org image 204x205]


I was thinking more like a combustible liquid in Zero-G on fire, what that'd look like. But i guess i'll never know, as that kind of thing is a no-no in any space mission.


Uh, like a mini-sun?
 
2012-06-26 08:11:59 PM

Counter_Intelligent: Nice. I wonder if the glob of air is more likely to have/retain a more spherical shape than the water.


Yes.
 
2012-06-26 08:18:05 PM

Satanic_Hamster: That's totally shopped. I can see the pixels on my computer screen.


We all see pixels on our computer screens.
 
2012-06-26 08:35:33 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: Satanic_Hamster: That's totally shopped. I can see the pixels on my computer screen.

We all see pixels on our computer screens.


OMG. Everything is shopped!
 
2012-06-26 08:57:13 PM
So refraction only works in space? I'll give it a 2 out of 10. It doesn't have a beat and I can't dance to it.
 
2012-06-26 10:01:38 PM
How much did this neat trick cost?
 
2012-06-26 11:23:00 PM
Have you ever seen fire in zero gravity?

It's beautiful. It's like liquid...it slides all over everything. Comes up in waves. And they just kept hitting him, wave after wave. He was screaming for me to save him.
 
2012-06-27 12:35:53 AM

RedVentrue: urban.derelict: Haha subby has an enlarged humerus for knowing H2O molecules are 'bent' due to their valence shell electrons 118° apart, making water both adhesive (opposed to cohesive) and magnetic.

/6.022x1023; Avogadro's number
//not just a good idea; it's the (scientific) law

6.022x1023 only tastes good with mole.


I see what you did there.
a0.twimg.com
 
X15
2012-06-27 12:48:19 AM

Gough: What did this guy do, stuff Don Pettit into the airlock??


casual disregard: Don Pettit?

RTFA

Well, maybe next time.

/it's usually don pettit


Who do you want to bet took the picture?
 
2012-06-27 01:20:40 AM

Smoking GNU: Lemme try this again:

Liquid combustible

Oxygen containing atmo

Zero gravity


yeah so you're gonna have a tank of something with a flame shooting out of the valve, the color is up to you cuz everything burns different colors, people are just most familiar with the orange because that's the oxygen combusting the flammable.

Smoking GNU: Liquid combustible

Oxygen containing atmo

Zero gravity


BORING. I mean, what would you expect it to look like, low/zero g the flames would sheet out in 360 directions on x, y, and z axis...axes?

I'll tell you what's cooler, get high and set your fireplace up correctly and start it up and close the doors 3/4 of the way so it's really sucking air in, with a rolled up newspaper as your starter log. It's incredible as you see red and white-hot pages burn away one by one over each other. It's crazy. SURREAL.
 
2012-06-27 03:44:09 AM
I want to know what happens if you float a glob of water in zero-g and then put a fish in it. I imagine the fish would swim right out of the water and into the air and die unless you kept pushing it back in.
 
2012-06-27 07:45:22 AM
Somebody submit this link as a photoshop contest. What do you see inside this water drop?
 
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