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(Daily Download)   Alan Turing: Badassery and Big Questions   (daily-download.com) divider line 67
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3883 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Jun 2012 at 1:07 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-26 09:51:24 AM
If Alan Turing was the father of computer science and Ada Lovelace was the mother, and she died about 50 years before he was born... then how did they have chitlens?
 
2012-06-26 10:13:44 AM

Because People in power are Stupid: then how did they have chitlens?


Digitally
 
2012-06-26 10:17:02 AM

Because People in power are Stupid: If Alan Turing was the father of computer science and Ada Lovelace was the mother, and she died about 50 years before he was born... then how did they have chitlens?


www.nerdfit.com

"She's got one helluva back seat, ya know."
 
2012-06-26 11:25:37 AM
Gay guys are always the best tragic scientists.

Wait, what is this thread about?
 
2012-06-26 01:09:34 PM
Despite recent investigations showing that his death was probably an accident, and not suicide, the way the UK treated him for being gay is nevertheless incredibly sad.
 
2012-06-26 01:18:11 PM

DeltaPunch: Despite recent investigations showing that his death was probably an accident, and not suicide, the way the UK treated him for being gay is nevertheless incredibly sad.


The assumption that his death was suicide is part and parcel of the poor treatment of Turning by the UK.

/they never even bother testing the apple for cyanide
 
2012-06-26 01:21:05 PM

SphericalTime: Gay guys are always the best tragic scientists.

Wait, what is this thread about?


Tesla was asexual. And and engineer.
 
2012-06-26 01:42:30 PM

Dwight_Yeast: DeltaPunch: Despite recent investigations showing that his death was probably an accident, and not suicide, the way the UK treated him for being gay is nevertheless incredibly sad.

The assumption that his death was suicide is part and parcel of the poor treatment of Turning by the UK.

/they never even bother testing the apple for cyanide


Is Claire Romilly what happened to him?
 
2012-06-26 01:48:05 PM
And how could that article not mention Blade Runner.

/my lawn, off it.
 
2012-06-26 01:54:56 PM

xooxox: And how could that article not mention Blade Runner.

/my lawn, off it.


I'm guessing that the author is in his 20's.
 
2012-06-26 01:55:38 PM

CygnusDarius: SphericalTime: Gay guys are always the best tragic scientists.

Wait, what is this thread about?

Tesla was asexual. And and engineer.


Isn't that redundant?
 
2012-06-26 02:02:39 PM
Being this is his centennial, he likely would have been departed anyway, but it's sure a pity he didn't live long enough to see microchips, or the advent of the PC, not to mention the world wide web and smart phones.
 
2012-06-26 02:05:25 PM

CygnusDarius: SphericalTime: Gay guys are always the best tragic scientists.

Wait, what is this thread about?

Tesla was asexual. And and engineer.


But you repeat your...

FloydA: CygnusDarius: SphericalTime: Gay guys are always the best tragic scientists.

Wait, what is this thread about?

Tesla was asexual. And and engineer.

Isn't that redundant?


DAMMIT.
 
2012-06-26 02:07:34 PM
It would just be nice if Turing became a household name. School children should be learning about him along with other great scientific minds of the 20th century.
 
2012-06-26 02:07:52 PM
for the record, Steve Jobs even denied the "Turing's eating the suicide-injected apple inspired the Apple 'missing a bite' logo" story. it is in the recent bio.
 
2012-06-26 02:10:49 PM

Glenford: CygnusDarius: SphericalTime: Gay guys are always the best tragic scientists.

Wait, what is this thread about?

Tesla was asexual. And and engineer.

But you repeat your...

FloydA: CygnusDarius: SphericalTime: Gay guys are always the best tragic scientists.

Wait, what is this thread about?

Tesla was asexual. And and engineer.

Isn't that redundant?

DAMMIT.


You sound like you know engineers pretty well.
 
2012-06-26 02:12:40 PM
If you ask me, I'd say Waterhouse did more for the war effort than Turing, Shaftoe, and that creepy priest combined.

Too bad his grandkid was such a tragic baffoon.
 
2012-06-26 02:16:50 PM

Feepit: If you ask me, I'd say Waterhouse did more for the war effort than Turing, Shaftoe, and that creepy priest combined.

Too bad his grandkid was such a tragic baffoon.


Oohh, a "Craptonomicon" reference. I never would have suspected!
 
2012-06-26 02:23:44 PM

rickythepenguin: for the record, Steve Jobs even denied the "Turing's eating the suicide-injected apple inspired the Apple 'missing a bite' logo" story. it is in the recent bio.


Well yeah, the original logo was clearly a function of the era's bad taste and extraneous logo colors.
 
2012-06-26 02:34:36 PM

dittybopper: Feepit: If you ask me, I'd say Waterhouse did more for the war effort than Turing, Shaftoe, and that creepy priest combined.

Too bad his grandkid was such a tragic baffoon.

Oohh, a "Craptonomicon" reference. I never would have suspected!


Once you realize the book is more about pent-up sexual frustration than encryption or security, it becomes a much easier read.

/still better than the movie references in the article
 
2012-06-26 02:34:41 PM

rickythepenguin: for the record, Steve Jobs even denied the "Turing's eating the suicide-injected apple inspired the Apple 'missing a bite' logo" story. it is in the recent bio.


And the original rainbow Apple logo had nothing to do with gay rights. And yet both rumors persist.
 
2012-06-26 02:39:43 PM

Feepit: dittybopper: Feepit: If you ask me, I'd say Waterhouse did more for the war effort than Turing, Shaftoe, and that creepy priest combined.

Too bad his grandkid was such a tragic baffoon.

Oohh, a "Craptonomicon" reference. I never would have suspected!

Once you realize the book is more about pent-up sexual frustration than encryption or security, it becomes a much easier read.

/still better than the movie references in the article


I'm an ex-SIGINT weenie, one especially interested in the history of it, particularly as it pertains to the Second Battle of the Atlantic. I *SHOULD* be the perfect customer for that book.

It sucked. I don't care if it was about pent-up sexual frustration. Moby Dick really isn't about a whale, but it's still a good story.
 
2012-06-26 02:51:23 PM

dittybopper: Moby Dick really isn't about a whale, but it's still a good story.


Your benchmark for "good story" is Moby Dick? Really? Even the movie adaptations of it were boring. Reading it was awful.
 
2012-06-26 02:57:54 PM

SphericalTime: Gay guys are always the best tragic scientists.

Wait, what is this thread about?


Tesla had some crazy abstinence theory and Schrodinger was heterosexual and just really, really self-destructive. Both of them were more important as scientists and equally tragic, though I guess YMMV on the last bit.
 
2012-06-26 03:01:18 PM

Feepit: dittybopper: Moby Dick really isn't about a whale, but it's still a good story.

Your benchmark for "good story" is Moby Dick? Really? Even the movie adaptations of it were boring. Reading it was awful.


I disagree: The 1956 movie version was by no means boring.

Aside from that, however, the book itself isn't all that hard to read, not by the standards of the time. Either way, though, it's considered a classic.
 
2012-06-26 03:02:09 PM

Jim_Callahan: Schrodinger was heterosexual and just really, really self-destructive.


Well, he wasn't either, not until someone observed him.
 
2012-06-26 03:09:18 PM
I'd just like to go on record as saying I loved Cryptonomicon. There, I said it.
 
2012-06-26 03:16:07 PM

dittybopper: Feepit: dittybopper: Moby Dick really isn't about a whale, but it's still a good story.

Your benchmark for "good story" is Moby Dick? Really? Even the movie adaptations of it were boring. Reading it was awful.

I disagree: The 1956 movie version was by no means boring.

Aside from that, however, the book itself isn't all that hard to read, not by the standards of the time. Either way, though, it's considered a classic.


Seen three, but only remember the Patrick Stewart version, and that because of how strange he seemed in the role.

It wasn't difficult to read the book; just boring. The prose were about as spicy as plain rice cakes baked by a Quaker widow.

You will probably agree that just because something is called a classic doesn't make it worth the paper it is printed on.

There is also taste. For an example, I loved Don Quixote and Les Miserables, but anything written by Shakespeare I was misery.
 
2012-06-26 03:17:26 PM

Feepit: There is also taste. For an example, I loved Don Quixote and Les Miserables, but anything written by Shakespeare I was in misery.


FTFM.
 
2012-06-26 03:20:34 PM

Feepit: dittybopper: Feepit: dittybopper: Moby Dick really isn't about a whale, but it's still a good story.

Your benchmark for "good story" is Moby Dick? Really? Even the movie adaptations of it were boring. Reading it was awful.

I disagree: The 1956 movie version was by no means boring.

Aside from that, however, the book itself isn't all that hard to read, not by the standards of the time. Either way, though, it's considered a classic.

Seen three, but only remember the Patrick Stewart version, and that because of how strange he seemed in the role.

It wasn't difficult to read the book; just boring. The prose were about as spicy as plain rice cakes baked by a Quaker widow.

You will probably agree that just because something is called a classic doesn't make it worth the paper it is printed on.

There is also taste. For an example, I loved Don Quixote and Les Miserables, but anything written by Shakespeare I was misery.


Now see, I agree with your classic theorem, but I'm the opposite: I *LIKE* Shakespeare (though the shorter the play, the more I like it).

At any rate, I don't think Cryptonomicon falls into the same category of literature that we are discussing. It's certainly a *LARGE* novel, but other than that, I can't find much positive to say about it.
 
2012-06-26 03:25:11 PM
Technically, no. Asexual means someone has no desire to engage in coitus. Being an engineer means you lack the qualities others might want in a sexual partner, regardless of the engineer's desire for sex.
 
2012-06-26 03:34:23 PM

dittybopper: At any rate, I don't think Cryptonomicon falls into the same category of literature that we are discussing. It's certainly a *LARGE* novel, but other than that, I can't find much positive to say about it.


I wouldn't consider it a classic, either, and it certainly suffers from the same pitfalls of other unnecessarily long novels. It isn't even Stephenson's best novel: The Diamond Age was much better and much shorter.

What I think Cryptonomicon does successfully is highlight the contribution Turing made to the war effort and portray his gender preference in a fairly positive light.
 
2012-06-26 03:35:28 PM

exatron: Technically, no. Asexual means someone has no desire to engage in coitus. Being an engineer means you lack the qualities others might want in a sexual partner, regardless of the engineer's desire for sex.


Mode of reproduction.
 
2012-06-26 03:41:22 PM
Siri?

From what I've seen from Siri- outside of the obnoxious commercials- is that its no more intellegent than bots I encountered in IRC way back in the day.
 
2012-06-26 03:54:43 PM

Feepit: What I think Cryptonomicon does successfully is highlight the contribution Turing made to the war effort


Yeah, about that: Turing is rightly hailed as the theoretical father of the modern computer, but his contribution to the war effort has been somewhat overstated.

First, he didn't break Engima, nor did he invent the mechanical devices used to break it: A Pole named Marian Rejewski first broke Enigma in 1933, developing the mathematics for it along the way, back when Turing was still an undergrad. Turing had been working at Bletchley for a year, mostly spinning his wheels, until the Poles gave what they knew to the Brits. The British cryptological bombe was merely a bigger version of the Polish one, and while Turing helped design the British version, he wasn't alone: Welchman and others made valuable contributions.

That's not to say he wasn't a valuable cog in that machine, just that he was one cog among many, not the entire machine himself. I think a myth had been built up partly due to the tragedy of his treatment after the war, and partly due to the entire story of Bletchley Park not being revealed at first.
 
2012-06-26 04:28:39 PM

dittybopper: First, he didn't break Engima


That is your problem right there.

Enigma isn't one thing. There were different types of Enigma machines. Marian broke the version that was around in 1933, but as the Enigma machines became more sophisticated, other techniques had to be employed to crack them. Think of it like solving a Rubric cube. In one dimension (positioning nine blocks in a correct order) it is much easier than doing it in three dimensions (positioning 9x6 blocks in the correct order). To solve it, you need more sophisticated machinery and methods and you have to recognize higher-order patterns.

The book, Cryptonomicon, acknowledges this, and points out that Turin broke the naval Enigma, which was considered to be the most sophisticated version around at the time. Throughout the entire book, they're deciphering messages from various Enigma incarnations.
 
2012-06-26 06:02:48 PM
Rubric cube? Turin? I feel like there's some sort of subliminal message being sent. I wish he'd broken the navel Enigma. I'd spend the rest of the day playing with my belly button.
 
2012-06-26 06:17:39 PM

Feepit: dittybopper: First, he didn't break Engima

That is your problem right there.

Enigma isn't one thing. There were different types of Enigma machines. Marian broke the version that was around in 1933, but as the Enigma machines became more sophisticated, other techniques had to be employed to crack them. Think of it like solving a Rubric cube. In one dimension (positioning nine blocks in a correct order) it is much easier than doing it in three dimensions (positioning 9x6 blocks in the correct order). To solve it, you need more sophisticated machinery and methods and you have to recognize higher-order patterns.

The book, Cryptonomicon, acknowledges this, and points out that Turin broke the naval Enigma, which was considered to be the most sophisticated version around at the time. Throughout the entire book, they're deciphering messages from various Enigma incarnations.


Actually, Enigma *WAS* one thing, at least until the Kriegsmarine introduced the four rotor machine.

The common wheels were all wired the same.

The differences you are talking about aren't different "Enigmas", but differences in how the common machine was *USED* by the different services. Different keying procedures, mostly. The Kriegsmarine had the strongest procedures, but the theory of how to break them when you don't know the initial settings is the same for them all. The bombes used are the same.

There is a lot more to say, but life intervenes...
 
2012-06-26 07:52:52 PM
IIRC, the German military Enigmas were based on a commercial model that came out in the 20's. I'm not sure when the German military adopted their version, although, since Hitler came to power in 32', that doesn't give the Poles much time to grab a new machine and figure it out. I would guess that Rejewski did the initial work on one of the commercially available ones.
 
2012-06-26 07:59:24 PM

Feepit: dittybopper: Moby Dick really isn't about a whale, but it's still a good story.

Your benchmark for "good story" is Moby Dick? Really? Even the movie adaptations of it were boring. Reading it was awful.


Moby Dick is a great story told badly.
 
2012-06-26 08:27:35 PM

kahnzo: Rubric cube? Turin? I feel like there's some sort of subliminal message being sent. I wish he'd broken the navel Enigma. I'd spend the rest of the day playing with my belly button.


The encoded message is: Feepit \ does \ not \ proof-read.
 
2012-06-26 08:27:43 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com

/oblig
 
2012-06-26 08:46:55 PM
I've worked with lots and lots of engineers, and I can tell you that most of them are married and have kids. Even the younger ones.

Which I cannot understand for the life of me! I mean, you're a young guy with an advanced degree and are making REALLY good money, and the first thing you do is screw up your life by getting married and making babies. WTF is up with that, anyway?!?
 
2012-06-26 08:49:50 PM

fusillade762: [1.bp.blogspot.com image 309x400]

/oblig


LOL! I thought that was a Phelps-bot until I saw the rainbow flag.
 
2012-06-26 09:47:13 PM
To be fair, my Icelandic friend Siri is kind of a dipshiat.
 
2012-06-26 09:54:58 PM

Feepit: dittybopper: Moby Dick really isn't about a whale, but it's still a good story.

Your benchmark for "good story" is Moby Dick? Really? Even the movie adaptations of it were boring. Reading it was awful.


You know what else is boring and awful to read?
 
2012-06-26 09:58:56 PM

downstairs: Siri?

From what I've seen from Siri- outside of the obnoxious commercials- is that its no more intellegent than bots I encountered in IRC way back in the day.


HOW DOES THAT MAKE YOU FEEL?
 
2012-06-26 10:40:23 PM
Just to extend my previous point, it was Rejewski who invented the method of cryptanalyzing Enigma, and the solution isn't limited to just Enigma, it applies to rotor machines in general.

Turing, while rightly considered a giant in another field, stood on the shoulders of a giant in this one.
 
2012-06-27 12:07:57 AM
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2012-06-27 03:16:52 AM

Darth Invictus: I've worked with lots and lots of engineers, and I can tell you that most of them are married and have kids. Even the younger ones.

Which I cannot understand for the life of me! I mean, you're a young guy with an advanced degree and are making REALLY good money, and the first thing you do is screw up your life by getting married and making babies. WTF is up with that, anyway?!?


I know two different engineers that both have like 9 or 10 kids.
 
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