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(LiveLeak)   Check your eggs. Brought to you by the guys at the egg council   (liveleak.com) divider line 47
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4656 clicks; posted to Video » on 26 Jun 2012 at 12:39 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-26 09:32:43 AM
I see those creeps got to you too, subby :-(
 
2012-06-26 09:37:52 AM
Old news is SOOOOOOOOOO farking exciting.
 
2012-06-26 09:39:26 AM

Diogenes: I see those creeps got to you too, subby :-(


they get to everyone sooner or later.
 
2012-06-26 09:46:15 AM
What does it mean if my egg shot out of the water and splattered all over the ceiling?
 
2012-06-26 10:45:26 AM

Diogenes: What does it mean if my egg shot out of the water and splattered all over the ceiling?


It's the Spring Equinox?
 
2012-06-26 10:51:15 AM

Diogenes: I see those creeps got to you too, subby :-(


You'd better run Egg!
 
2012-06-26 11:18:38 AM
i385.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-26 12:44:33 PM

Diogenes: What does it mean if my egg shot out of the water and splattered all over the ceiling?


If you are currently in an arctic research station, be very, very worried!
 
2012-06-26 01:58:30 PM

Diogenes: What does it mean if my egg shot out of the water and splattered all over the ceiling?


Your kitchen was installed upside down.
 
2012-06-26 02:04:30 PM

WTFDYW: Old news is SOOOOOOOOOO farking exciting.


I only learned about using older eggs for peeling about a year ago.

scottydoesntknow: Diogenes: What does it mean if my egg shot out of the water and splattered all over the ceiling?

It's the Spring Equinox?


Lulz.
 
2012-06-26 02:05:06 PM
This checks out as true.
 
2012-06-26 02:06:54 PM
Carpe Scrotum
 
2012-06-26 02:20:36 PM
He should have cracked that egg and shown whether or not it looked just like a normal egg from that point. If it looked all rotten and shiat, obviously I don't need to check my eggs to avoid eating them in that state.
 
2012-06-26 02:37:39 PM

StoPPeRmobile: WTFDYW: Old news is SOOOOOOOOOO farking exciting.

I only learned about using older eggs for peeling about a year ago.
scottydoesntknow: Diogenes: What does it mean if my egg shot out of the water and splattered all over the ceiling?

It's the Spring Equinox?

Lulz.



Maybe it's old news to me because I've been in the egg business for 31 years.
 
2012-06-26 03:05:15 PM

WTFDYW: StoPPeRmobile: WTFDYW: Old news is SOOOOOOOOOO farking exciting.

I only learned about using older eggs for peeling about a year ago.
scottydoesntknow: Diogenes: What does it mean if my egg shot out of the water and splattered all over the ceiling?

It's the Spring Equinox?

Lulz.


Maybe it's old news to me because I've been in the egg business for 31 years.


Up on the roof, in my car
Up all night, I'm pulling through signs like Dolomite
The mack, I'm the Egg Man
Taxi Driver, I'm the Egg Man
 
2012-06-26 03:14:42 PM
Meh. I just used a carton of 2 year old eggs a month ago. Bought them when I bought my house, just never got around to eating them. Properly refrigerated the entire time. Tasted fine scrambled. They were a little darker yellow but otherwise looked and smelled just fine.
 
2012-06-26 03:16:32 PM
In other news, some people throw their old eggs in the trash. I just take them out back and throw them at trees.
 
2012-06-26 03:34:44 PM

Adalius: Meh. I just used a carton of 2 year old eggs a month ago. Bought them when I bought my house, just never got around to eating them. Properly refrigerated the entire time. Tasted fine scrambled. They were a little darker yellow but otherwise looked and smelled just fine.


i87.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-26 03:41:29 PM
coo coo ca choo
 
2012-06-26 03:59:09 PM

tweek46420: Adalius: Meh. I just used a carton of 2 year old eggs a month ago. Bought them when I bought my house, just never got around to eating them. Properly refrigerated the entire time. Tasted fine scrambled. They were a little darker yellow but otherwise looked and smelled just fine.

[i87.photobucket.com image 544x400]


Dead serious. I started my diet on May 1st so I would have ate them around May 15th, purchased end of May 2010, use by date was something like the end of June? 2010 if I remember. Bear in mind I keep my fridge at 34 degrees and since I'm only home in the evening and live alone it isn't being open and closed very much so the temperature stays pretty constant and super chilly (my Brita filter freezes if I push it back too far).
 
2012-06-26 04:08:29 PM

WTFDYW: I've been in the egg business for 31 years.


Maybe you would be able to tell us what causes the old eggs to want to float where as fresh ones sink like that.

I am kind of curious as to the science behind it.
 
2012-06-26 04:11:48 PM

Trawg: Maybe you would be able to tell us what causes the old eggs to want to float where as fresh ones sink like that.

I am kind of curious as to the science behind it.


Probably the amount of air that gets into the shell. More air = greater chance of bacterial contamination.
 
2012-06-26 04:14:09 PM

Trawg: WTFDYW: I've been in the egg business for 31 years.

Maybe you would be able to tell us what causes the old eggs to want to float where as fresh ones sink like that.

I am kind of curious as to the science behind it.


Egg shells aren't completely solid and air can slowly get in. If you ever hard boiled an egg you know it doesn't take up the entire internal volume of the shell as evidenced by the 'dent' in one end, that's the air pouch that slowly gets larger as air infiltrates. Air alone doesn't make an egg bad it just increases the odds of other stuff getting in and now having air to begin a decay process. Theoretically if you had an egg that only air could get in, not microbes, it would still never go rotten because the egg should be sterile when it comes out of the chicken.
 
2012-06-26 04:18:39 PM

Chariset: Trawg: Maybe you would be able to tell us what causes the old eggs to want to float where as fresh ones sink like that.

I am kind of curious as to the science behind it.

Probably the amount of air that gets into the shell. More air = greater chance of bacterial contamination.


Adalius pretty much answered it. The older the egg, the larger the air cell gets. Grade AA eggs would not float, Drade A eggs would tip up some. Grade be eggs would stand erect like the one in the video. Also, when they hit the grade B stage, you will notice the whites are more watery due to degredation. They are still good to eat, they are just runnier.
 
2012-06-26 04:28:10 PM

WTFDYW: Chariset: Trawg: Maybe you would be able to tell us what causes the old eggs to want to float where as fresh ones sink like that.

I am kind of curious as to the science behind it.

Probably the amount of air that gets into the shell. More air = greater chance of bacterial contamination.

Adalius pretty much answered it. The older the egg, the larger the air cell gets. Grade AA eggs would not float, Drade A eggs would tip up some. Grade be eggs would stand erect like the one in the video. Also, when they hit the grade B stage, you will notice the whites are more watery due to degredation. They are still good to eat, they are just runnier.


But... what about the grade see eggs?
 
2012-06-26 04:29:42 PM

Adalius: tweek46420: Adalius: Meh. I just used a carton of 2 year old eggs a month ago. Bought them when I bought my house, just never got around to eating them. Properly refrigerated the entire time. Tasted fine scrambled. They were a little darker yellow but otherwise looked and smelled just fine.

[i87.photobucket.com image 544x400]

Dead serious. I started my diet on May 1st so I would have ate them around May 15th, purchased end of May 2010, use by date was something like the end of June? 2010 if I remember. Bear in mind I keep my fridge at 34 degrees and since I'm only home in the evening and live alone it isn't being open and closed very much so the temperature stays pretty constant and super chilly (my Brita filter freezes if I push it back too far).


you know how I can tell you are single
 
2012-06-26 04:30:07 PM

Smackledorfer: He should have cracked that egg and shown whether or not it looked just like a normal egg from that point. If it looked all rotten and shiat, obviously I don't need to check my eggs to avoid eating them in that state.


From my experience they don't rot if they're kept refrigerated. The yolk darkens a little and the white becomes like a thick syrup. They actually don't even taste that bad.
 
2012-06-26 04:53:33 PM

tweek46420: Adalius: tweek46420: Adalius: Meh. I just used a carton of 2 year old eggs a month ago. Bought them when I bought my house, just never got around to eating them. Properly refrigerated the entire time. Tasted fine scrambled. They were a little darker yellow but otherwise looked and smelled just fine.

[i87.photobucket.com image 544x400]

Dead serious. I started my diet on May 1st so I would have ate them around May 15th, purchased end of May 2010, use by date was something like the end of June? 2010 if I remember. Bear in mind I keep my fridge at 34 degrees and since I'm only home in the evening and live alone it isn't being open and closed very much so the temperature stays pretty constant and super chilly (my Brita filter freezes if I push it back too far).

you know how I can tell you are single


Mid-divorce, thanks for bringing it up. Ass.
/Sob-cry.

Seriously though. Grew up on a hobby farm eating fresh eggs all the time. Once in awhile you crack a stillborn open and get a shock. After that I learned if the inside looks normal and smells normal, eat it, otherwise don't.
 
2012-06-26 05:08:58 PM

TXEric: WTFDYW: Chariset: Trawg: Maybe you would be able to tell us what causes the old eggs to want to float where as fresh ones sink like that.

I am kind of curious as to the science behind it.

Probably the amount of air that gets into the shell. More air = greater chance of bacterial contamination.

Adalius pretty much answered it. The older the egg, the larger the air cell gets. Grade AA eggs would not float, Drade A eggs would tip up some. Grade be eggs would stand erect like the one in the video. Also, when they hit the grade B stage, you will notice the whites are more watery due to degredation. They are still good to eat, they are just runnier.

But... what about the grade see eggs?


The grade is determined by the size of the air cell. However, most eggs are labelled A even though they are most likely AA grade. It saves cost of stocking two different types of egg cartons. Inventory is money.
 
2012-06-26 05:59:05 PM

Gilligann: Smackledorfer: He should have cracked that egg and shown whether or not it looked just like a normal egg from that point. If it looked all rotten and shiat, obviously I don't need to check my eggs to avoid eating them in that state.

From my experience they don't rot if they're kept refrigerated. The yolk darkens a little and the white becomes like a thick syrup. They actually don't even taste that bad.


I've occasionally tossed some just by age, but I've eaten some pretty old eggs without having a problem. Never did a water test on them first though.
 
2012-06-26 06:43:54 PM
What he failed to mention was this only works in the Northern Hemisphere - it's exactly the opposite south of the equator.
 
2012-06-26 07:50:18 PM

trippdogg: What he failed to mention was this only works in the Northern Hemisphere - it's exactly the opposite south of the equator.


riiiiiiiiight.
 
2012-06-26 08:31:23 PM

some_beer_drinker: trippdogg: What he failed to mention was this only works in the Northern Hemisphere - it's exactly the opposite south of the equator.

riiiiiiiiight.


Gravity is backwards there. South of the equator, people have to secure their utensils when they are on the table with magnets in case they all into the sky, and people have rails on their shoes to help them stay on the ground via use of tracks going every which way.

It is generally recommended that people stay on a strict diet when down south... the larger one gets, the more "pull" they have towards space. If you're skinny, you don't so much fall at first, it is more of a float, so you have a small amount of time to grab hold of something and bring yourself back down to Earth. If you're huge, though... best not to leave your compound, lest you become victim of anti-Newtonian physics.

How they manage down there is just beyond me.
 
2012-06-26 08:49:14 PM

WTFDYW: Old news is SOOOOOOOOOO farking exciting.


Yeah, and people whining about it never gets old. Thanks.
 
2012-06-26 08:50:00 PM
img.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-26 08:53:54 PM

Adalius: tweek46420: Adalius: Meh. I just used a carton of 2 year old eggs a month ago. Bought them when I bought my house, just never got around to eating them. Properly refrigerated the entire time. Tasted fine scrambled. They were a little darker yellow but otherwise looked and smelled just fine.

[i87.photobucket.com image 544x400]

Dead serious. I started my diet on May 1st so I would have ate them around May 15th, purchased end of May 2010, use by date was something like the end of June? 2010 if I remember. Bear in mind I keep my fridge at 34 degrees and since I'm only home in the evening and live alone it isn't being open and closed very much so the temperature stays pretty constant and super chilly (my Brita filter freezes if I push it back too far).


Heck, I've had hundred-year-old egg. It didn't look tasty, and I didn't like it, but I didn't get sick from it.
 
2012-06-26 08:59:56 PM

Adalius: tweek46420: Adalius: tweek46420: Adalius: Meh. I just used a carton of 2 year old eggs a month ago. Bought them when I bought my house, just never got around to eating them. Properly refrigerated the entire time. Tasted fine scrambled. They were a little darker yellow but otherwise looked and smelled just fine.

[i87.photobucket.com image 544x400]

Dead serious. I started my diet on May 1st so I would have ate them around May 15th, purchased end of May 2010, use by date was something like the end of June? 2010 if I remember. Bear in mind I keep my fridge at 34 degrees and since I'm only home in the evening and live alone it isn't being open and closed very much so the temperature stays pretty constant and super chilly (my Brita filter freezes if I push it back too far).

you know how I can tell you are single

Mid-divorce, thanks for bringing it up. Ass.
/Sob-cry.

Seriously though. Grew up on a hobby farm eating fresh eggs all the time. Once in awhile you crack a stillborn open and get a shock. After that I learned if the inside looks normal and smells normal, eat it, otherwise don't.


Used to raise chickens myself, and that's exactly right. Eggs last much longer than people think they do. We're the only country in the world that even bothers to refrigerate them. And they go bad so quickly that I guarantee you you'll never accidentally eat a bad egg. If it seems okay to you, it is. (Note this has nothing to do with certain infectious agents such as salmonella -- but those are not a factor of freshness or age: fresh eggs are just a likely to be infected.)

The dates on eggs are not the date they 'go bad,' or even close to it. That's the prime freshness date only. You can eat them long after that.

The main thing you notice about very fresh eggs is that they rise more when cooked and the yolks are brighter yellow. The yolks darken over time due mostly to water loss, and they won't rise as high. But if it doesn't scare you when you crack it, it's almost certainly good to eat.

Bear in mind that eggs are a kind of produce, and it's hard to control that. Any *given* egg can be bad, no matter how old it is.
 
2012-06-26 09:01:20 PM

RoxtarRyan: some_beer_drinker: trippdogg: What he failed to mention was this only works in the Northern Hemisphere - it's exactly the opposite south of the equator.

riiiiiiiiight.

Gravity is backwards there. South of the equator, people have to secure their utensils when they are on the table with magnets in case they all into the sky, and people have rails on their shoes to help them stay on the ground via use of tracks going every which way.

It is generally recommended that people stay on a strict diet when down south... the larger one gets, the more "pull" they have towards space. If you're skinny, you don't so much fall at first, it is more of a float, so you have a small amount of time to grab hold of something and bring yourself back down to Earth. If you're huge, though... best not to leave your compound, lest you become victim of anti-Newtonian physics.

How they manage down there is just beyond me.


Does this have anything to do with why they talk backwards? I've always wondered about that.
 
2012-06-26 09:06:56 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: RoxtarRyan: some_beer_drinker: trippdogg: What he failed to mention was this only works in the Northern Hemisphere - it's exactly the opposite south of the equator.

riiiiiiiiight.

Gravity is backwards there. South of the equator, people have to secure their utensils when they are on the table with magnets in case they all into the sky, and people have rails on their shoes to help them stay on the ground via use of tracks going every which way.

It is generally recommended that people stay on a strict diet when down south... the larger one gets, the more "pull" they have towards space. If you're skinny, you don't so much fall at first, it is more of a float, so you have a small amount of time to grab hold of something and bring yourself back down to Earth. If you're huge, though... best not to leave your compound, lest you become victim of anti-Newtonian physics.

How they manage down there is just beyond me.

Does this have anything to do with why they talk backwards? I've always wondered about that.


.skcender kcom ew woh ekil fo dniK .snrettap hceeps rieht tuoba evitisnes yrev er'yeht ....hcum oot meht gnikcom trats t'nod ,yeH
 
2012-06-26 11:31:15 PM
Sylvia_Bandersnatch: We're the only country in the world that even bothers to refrigerate them.
Here you have to refrigerate them, because USDA forces pasteurization on the egg producers. That kills all the bacteria good and bad. Most of the world does not, and therefore you should not refrigerate those eggs, and the good bacteria keeps the bad bacteria at bay longer, or something like that.
Also, if you find lumps or tenderness that's bad too.
 
2012-06-26 11:51:12 PM

ShoeKing: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: We're the only country in the world that even bothers to refrigerate them.
Here you have to refrigerate them, because USDA forces pasteurization on the egg producers. That kills all the bacteria good and bad. Most of the world does not, and therefore you should not refrigerate those eggs, and the good bacteria keeps the bad bacteria at bay longer, or something like that.
Also, if you find lumps or tenderness that's bad too.


I've never looked into pasteurization of eggs and the specifics behind it. I have looked into milk, and I lol at people who complain about the process. Should I feel the same way about eggs, or differently?

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Does this have anything to do with why they talk backwards? I've always wondered about that.



Are you a broom?

/obscure? (of course not, its fark)
//single character challenge is the only way to go.
 
2012-06-27 12:14:03 AM

ShoeKing: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: We're the only country in the world that even bothers to refrigerate them.
Here you have to refrigerate them, because USDA forces pasteurization on the egg producers. That kills all the bacteria good and bad. Most of the world does not, and therefore you should not refrigerate those eggs, and the good bacteria keeps the bad bacteria at bay longer, or something like that.
Also, if you find lumps or tenderness that's bad too.


I thought it was because the government made egg producers wash the eggs. Doing so removes some sort of protective film which the egg producers replace with a thin oil but doesn't work as well as keeping the eggs fresh or something like that.

/if only there was somebody here with 30+ years in the industry who could set the record straight.
 
2012-06-27 12:42:24 AM
As long as I don't have to stop eating cookie dough, I don't really care what reality is regarding egg safety.
 
2012-06-27 12:48:02 AM

relaxitsjustme: ShoeKing: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: We're the only country in the world that even bothers to refrigerate them.
Here you have to refrigerate them, because USDA forces pasteurization on the egg producers. That kills all the bacteria good and bad. Most of the world does not, and therefore you should not refrigerate those eggs, and the good bacteria keeps the bad bacteria at bay longer, or something like that.
Also, if you find lumps or tenderness that's bad too.

I thought it was because the government made egg producers wash the eggs. Doing so removes some sort of protective film which the egg producers replace with a thin oil but doesn't work as well as keeping the eggs fresh or something like that.

/if only there was somebody here with 30+ years in the industry who could set the record straight.


I don't have time to research this in depth right now, but a cursory search suggests to me that the main issue is a fairly recent one, historically speaking: salmonella. Specifically, stronger strains that have arisen in recent decades. Even the USDA egg safety guidelines I read (remote-cited, so not linking, as it's not an 'original source' in that context) specified Salmonella as the agent of concern, and also said "today" in a context suggesting that it's a recent issue. Those same guidelines did not indicate that other agents were of concern, but did not that dairy is subject to spoilage the same as any other produce.
 
2012-06-27 04:56:26 PM

some_beer_drinker: trippdogg: What he failed to mention was this only works in the Northern Hemisphere - it's exactly the opposite south of the equator.

riiiiiiiiight.


After further research it turns out it 's not eggs but toilets that function differently in the Southern Hemisphere - which would explain why people always say my omelettes taste a little strange...
 
2012-06-27 06:58:30 PM
I raise chickens and I sell farm fresh eggs. Well, I don't sell them - I 'request a donation' - so FDA stay away.

Most people don't know this, but eggs that you buy in a supermarket are 3-4 months old on average before you buy them.

I could go on and on about all the BS labeling on them ('free-range', all vegetarian fed, etc.) but I won't.

Buy directly from a farmer if you can! You'll never go back to store-bought eggs again.
 
2012-06-27 07:04:04 PM

baldylox: I raise chickens and I sell farm fresh eggs. Well, I don't sell them - I 'request a donation' - so FDA stay away.

Most people don't know this, but eggs that you buy in a supermarket are 3-4 months old on average before you buy them.

I could go on and on about all the BS labeling on them ('free-range', all vegetarian fed, etc.) but I won't.

Buy directly from a farmer if you can! You'll never go back to store-bought eggs again.


You are so full of shiat I can smell it here in Indiana.
 
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