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(Wired)   19 patents invented by ingenious celebrities. Of course Yakov Smirnoff made the list   (wired.com) divider line 60
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11473 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Jun 2012 at 12:27 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-26 10:28:57 AM  
In Corporate America, invention patents you!
 
2012-06-26 12:38:27 PM  
Went looking for Hedy Lamarr. While she is on there, she is really in a league by herself. Her patents were not only critical during the war, but are a foundation for telecommunications in general.
 
2012-06-26 12:41:04 PM  

madgonad: Went looking for Hedy Lamarr. While she is on there, she is really in a league by herself. Her patents were not only critical during the war, but are a foundation for telecommunications in general.


rashmanly.files.wordpress.com

"I am still in litigation with that plagarizing tramp, thank you very much."
 
2012-06-26 12:44:23 PM  
That was pretty fascinating.
 
2012-06-26 12:45:24 PM  

madgonad: Went looking for Hedy Lamarr. While she is on there, she is really in a league by herself. Her patents were not only critical during the war, but are a foundation for telecommunications in general.


This.

Also FTFA: Kurt Vonnegut's Easily Cleaned Tobacco Pipe

I've never needed to clean a bowl while there was tobacco in it.
 
2012-06-26 12:46:08 PM  
I'd have a drink with Smirnov.
 
2012-06-26 12:48:04 PM  

rjakobi: I'd have a drink with Smirnov.


I've met him. He's as friendly and patriotic as any red-blooded (no pun intended) American.
 
2012-06-26 01:03:29 PM  
Of course Neil Young, owner of Lionel Trains, has a patent related to model trains.

I had to go see the full Smirnov patent. It's a cleverly done stack of waterproof paper that might prevent water from getting between the sheets and growing mold.

List is missing Roald Dahl's brain drain patent.
 
2012-06-26 01:04:12 PM  
I would have a bath with Deborah Harry.
 
2012-06-26 01:11:27 PM  
Anyone else surprised that Penn's invention is sexual in nature?

/Me neither. The man is sex personified.
 
2012-06-26 01:13:36 PM  
Did he invent vodak?
 
2012-06-26 01:14:13 PM  

madgonad: Went looking for Hedy Lamarr. While she is on there, she is really in a league by herself. Her patents were not only critical during the war, but are a foundation for telecommunications in general.


1. No they weren't, and

2. No they aren't.

Her patent wasn't used during WWII. First, it's hard to radio control a torpedo. We don't even do that today (we use wire-guided ones), and second, no US torpedo or other guided weapon from WWII ever used something even remotely similar to that patent. It was filed and forgotten.

Modern telecommunications don't use piano rolls to control frequency hopping, which is what the patent is based upon: Switching crystals which control the frequency of the associated transmitter and receiver via the use of a perforated sheet and contacts similar to a player piano roll. The concept of frequency hopping itself was invented before she and her piano man came up with the idea.
 
2012-06-26 01:17:19 PM  

LaViergeNoire: Anyone else surprised that Penn's invention is sexual in nature?

/Me neither. The man is sex personified.


That's an interesting way of calling him a dick.
 
2012-06-26 01:18:51 PM  

xanadian: In Corporate America, invention patents you!


www.maniacworld.com
 
2012-06-26 01:26:42 PM  
did they mention Paul Winchell?
 
2012-06-26 01:33:44 PM  
Julie Newmar's Cheeky Derriere Relief is basically the beginning of SPANKS

I think she could make a serious patent infringement case.

The inventor of Spanks is a freakin' billionaire!

Link
 
2012-06-26 01:35:22 PM  
No love for Thomas Dolby & his mobile phone ringtone patents?
If you've owned a cellphone, you had Thoma Dolby-patented tech in your pocket!

/Science!
 
2012-06-26 01:43:21 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: Julie Newmar's Cheeky Derriere Relief is basically the beginning of SPANKS

I think she could make a serious patent infringement case.


Newmar's patent expired in 1992, so it's at most a prior art reference for Blakely's patent (which curiously doesn't cite the Newmar patent, but is nonetheless quite a bit different).
 
2012-06-26 01:45:15 PM  

madgonad: Went looking for Hedy Lamarr. While she is on there, she is really in a league by herself. Her patents were not only critical during the war, but are a foundation for telecommunications in general.


That's Hedley.
 
2012-06-26 01:47:10 PM  
Didn't Steve Allen have some medical patients regarding the heart. I also thought I heard that Jerry Lewis dabbled in some science or medical patents as well. However I might have gotten the two mixed up.
 
2012-06-26 01:52:01 PM  
I thought Yakov's invention would be the dinner tray with four magnets, the real attraction at his Branson dinner theater.
 
2012-06-26 01:56:28 PM  

jimw: I also thought I heard that Jerry Lewis dabbled in some science or medical patents as well.


www.jonathanrosenbaum.com
 
2012-06-26 02:00:53 PM  

Theaetetus: SmellsLikePoo: Julie Newmar's Cheeky Derriere Relief is basically the beginning of SPANKS

I think she could make a serious patent infringement case.

Newmar's patent expired in 1992, so it's at most a prior art reference for Blakely's patent (which curiously doesn't cite the Newmar patent, but is nonetheless quite a bit different).


You clearly know much more about patent law than me. I fail to see how spanks are patentable though.
 
2012-06-26 02:06:52 PM  
While not a celebrity, a relative of mine invented the tool used to safely open the chamber on an air brake.
 
2012-06-26 02:08:32 PM  
Really needs one of the best inventors Les Paul who is in the inventors hall of fame. Link Also as an aside Eddie Van Halen, has two patents (US 7,183,475 and US 4,656,917)
 
2012-06-26 02:10:34 PM  
And the list neglected Gary Burghoff's sensational fish attractor.

C'mon! with an alter-ego by the name of "Radar," the guy just has to be a tinkerer in some way.
 
2012-06-26 02:14:54 PM  

jimw: Didn't Steve Allen have some medical patients regarding the heart. I also thought I heard that Jerry Lewis dabbled in some science or medical patents as well. However I might have gotten the two mixed up.


Don't know about Steve Allen, but Jerry Lewis pioneered on-set video playback for directors and actors to
supplement/replace the daily rushes. Don't know if was patented, though.
 
2012-06-26 02:15:06 PM  

E_Henry_Thripshaws_Disease: did they mention Paul Winchell?


Negative. List, useless, etc etc.

Paul Winchell and the Artificial Heart
 
2012-06-26 02:20:37 PM  
Christie Brinkley's Educational Toy

Or a tube sock to the rest of us.
 
2012-06-26 02:21:10 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: Theaetetus: SmellsLikePoo: Julie Newmar's Cheeky Derriere Relief is basically the beginning of SPANKS

I think she could make a serious patent infringement case.

Newmar's patent expired in 1992, so it's at most a prior art reference for Blakely's patent (which curiously doesn't cite the Newmar patent, but is nonetheless quite a bit different).

You clearly know much more about patent law than me. I fail to see how spanks are patentable though.


Well, they're patent-eligible subject matter as an article of manufacture under 35 USC 101. For novelty and obviousness (35 USC 102 and 103 respectively), you have to look at the claims and find one or more prior art references that, alone or in combination, teach or suggest each and every element of the claims. In other words, if you claim A+B+C+D+E, the Examiner has to find a reference that includes, say, A+B, and another that includes C+D+E and say why they're combinable.
I haven't looked at the prosecution history, but if the Examiner couldn't find an element in the references, then the claims are patentable.

Additionally, look at how quickly they took off commercially. That's usually evidence that there wasn't anything in the market that served that need, and since it's clearly commercially valuable, it must not be an obvious idea or someone would have done it.
 
2012-06-26 02:30:32 PM  

Theaetetus: SmellsLikePoo: Theaetetus: SmellsLikePoo: Julie Newmar's Cheeky Derriere Relief is basically the beginning of SPANKS

I think she could make a serious patent infringement case.

Newmar's patent expired in 1992, so it's at most a prior art reference for Blakely's patent (which curiously doesn't cite the Newmar patent, but is nonetheless quite a bit different).

You clearly know much more about patent law than me. I fail to see how spanks are patentable though.

Well, they're patent-eligible subject matter as an article of manufacture under 35 USC 101. For novelty and obviousness (35 USC 102 and 103 respectively), you have to look at the claims and find one or more prior art references that, alone or in combination, teach or suggest each and every element of the claims. In other words, if you claim A+B+C+D+E, the Examiner has to find a reference that includes, say, A+B, and another that includes C+D+E and say why they're combinable.
I haven't looked at the prosecution history, but if the Examiner couldn't find an element in the references, then the claims are patentable.

Additionally, look at how quickly they took off commercially. That's usually evidence that there wasn't anything in the market that served that need, and since it's clearly commercially valuable, it must not be an obvious idea or someone would have done it.


Am I correct that you studied engineering of some type?

I studied civil engineering and have played with the idea of patent law...
 
2012-06-26 02:33:41 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: Am I correct that you studied engineering of some type?

I studied civil engineering and have played with the idea of patent law...


Yep. Audio, broadcast, and electrical. And patent law is hella-awesome, if you're an engineer and a pedant who loves to argue.
 
2012-06-26 02:36:21 PM  

Theaetetus: SmellsLikePoo: Am I correct that you studied engineering of some type?

I studied civil engineering and have played with the idea of patent law...

Yep. Audio, broadcast, and electrical. And patent law is hella-awesome, if you're an engineer and a pedant who loves to argue.


That is probably the most attractive description of patent law I've ever heard.

Did you go straight undergrad to law?

/yeah, I'm thread jacking...
 
2012-06-26 02:45:57 PM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

Hello Patent Office? How's that application for Jane Russell's bra coming?
 
2012-06-26 03:02:11 PM  

Theaetetus: if you're an engineer and a pedant who loves to argue


This redundant message brought to you by the Redundat Agency of Redundancy.
 
2012-06-26 03:11:38 PM  

Theaetetus: And patent law is hella-awesome, if you're an engineer and a pedant who loves to argue.


You're on Fark, you've got that last bit covered.
 
2012-06-26 03:20:33 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: Theaetetus: SmellsLikePoo: Am I correct that you studied engineering of some type?

I studied civil engineering and have played with the idea of patent law...

Yep. Audio, broadcast, and electrical. And patent law is hella-awesome, if you're an engineer and a pedant who loves to argue.

That is probably the most attractive description of patent law I've ever heard.

Did you go straight undergrad to law?

/yeah, I'm thread jacking...


Oh, hell no, and I wouldn't want to hire anyone that did. I was a working engineer for 8 years and got bored.

Look up patent agent or technical specialist programs... You work at a firm writing and prosecuting patents, earn a nice salary, get experience, get law school paid for, and get a pretty-much guaranteed job afterwards.
 
2012-06-26 03:22:24 PM  
Also, look for an evening law school. You don't need the big ivy-league name on your diploma if you've already got a job at a law firm - your professional experience is worth much more in that regard - and it's easier to fit around a full-time work schedule and preferred by the firms.
 
2012-06-26 03:32:43 PM  

Theaetetus: Also, look for an evening law school. You don't need the big ivy-league name on your diploma if you've already got a job at a law firm - your professional experience is worth much more in that regard - and it's easier to fit around a full-time work schedule and preferred by the firms.


Thanks for the input.

I've been working as a project manager in the construction field for 4 years and I feel the boredom creeping in. With the engineering degree and my love of all things science I always considered this path. The patent agent option sounds interesting.
 
2012-06-26 03:35:23 PM  
No prob. The nice part about going the agent/technical specialist route is that you can look for the job now without having to (a) leave your current job; (b) apply to law school; and (c) gamble a bunch of money and debt on an unknown.
 
2012-06-26 03:37:26 PM  
Yes precisely.

I've been playing with the idea of switching fields but the prospect is daunting, what with a new house purchase, possible kids coming in the near future, etc...

Thanks again.
 
2012-06-26 03:37:32 PM  
24.media.tumblr.com

I'd patent her assets
 
2012-06-26 03:47:15 PM  

Theaetetus: Also, look for an evening law school. You don't need the big ivy-league name on your diploma if you've already got a job at a law firm - your professional experience is worth much more in that regard - and it's easier to fit around a full-time work schedule and preferred by the firms.


Another option to gain patent experience is working for the Patent Office as an examiner. I don't know if they still do this but they pay for either all of law school or a substantial portion of it. The DC area has several night law schools and now the PTO is or is about to open a satellite office in Detroit. If you complete four years at the PTO you may get the exam requirement waived.
 
2012-06-26 03:57:31 PM  
Theaetetus:

sdd2000:


And this is why I keep coming back to the Fark forums. Thanks.
 
mhd
2012-06-26 04:07:54 PM  

sdd2000: Really needs one of the best inventors Les Paul who is in the inventors hall of fame. Link Also as an aside Eddie Van Halen, has two patents (US 7,183,475 and US 4,656,917)


If we're talking guitar players, we have to mention Tom Scholz. He's been inventing for a long time.
 
2012-06-26 04:11:10 PM  

Iblis824: Do Russians have "In Capitalist America" jokes?


So apparently not, then.
 
2012-06-26 04:22:38 PM  
Pffft, amateurs.

I have the patent on a real-life Voltron.


/kinda do, actually
//has to do with multiple, independent space craft connecting together into a single craft and then flying as a combined unit.
///close enough that I'm claiming Voltron.
 
2012-06-26 05:00:24 PM  

DontMakeMeComeBackThere:
//has to do with multiple, independent space craft connecting together into a single craft and then flying as a combined unit.


F6?

--Carlos V.
 
2012-06-26 05:19:52 PM  
Neil Young's Controller For a Model Train Toy Set

Sample and Hold?
 
2012-06-26 06:07:23 PM  
I am not famous, but I have a patent

While working at Micron Technology, I invented this:

Method for Measuring a Thickness of a Printed Circuit Board, 5,212,540
 
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