If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Atlantic)   "Hire good people and leave them alone"   (theatlantic.com) divider line 62
    More: Obvious  
•       •       •

5940 clicks; posted to Business » on 24 Jun 2012 at 4:16 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



62 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-06-24 04:29:14 PM  
I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

I get free lunches. It sounds great. In practice, I get crappy cafeteria food that probably costs my company $10 per day; and I get to spend my lunch talking about work with coworkers or sitting in front of my desk doing more work. Yippie!

And working on pet projects? Oh great - give me time to work on something I love *SO THAT YOU OWN IT*.

I can understand companies trying to get every cent they can from their employees - but I really don't understand why people seem to think it's working in their benefit. It's not. Companies are hiring smart people, letting them do million-dollar work while paying them 80k a year and owning everything they create. And if you really bust your ass - you might get a promotion into middle management or upper middle management.
 
2012-06-24 04:40:11 PM  
This was pretty much what Aramark did with the crew at Glendale Arena. We had a great crew, we weren't necessarily the clean cut folks that people imagine chefs to be, but we got things done, and we had a great time doing it, and came in under budget more times than not. Mind you, that was at Sports/Entertainment facility, as opposed to Corporate dining, and there is are certainly locations that are not as tightly run as that facility, but overall, my experience with the company was positive, because management didn't give a rat's butt HOW we did the job, just that it got done, and that we made our clients happy doing it.

That meant that we bent rules. That meant that we often pulled events off with more than what was required, and we managed to stay in budget, because we knew our inventory, we trusted the skill sets of the folks we had working, and we turned out amuse bouche and little extras out at the drop of a hat, that LOOKED complicated, but were actually pretty easy to produce, and we utilized what we had on hand pretty well.

Less about hiring introverts, than trusting your people to do their jobs. You hire folks you trust, and worry less about who gets credit, than looking at the clients' reactions. Ego IS an issue, but less about introverts and extroverts, than hiring folks who are effective. My chef at Aramark was an amazingly outgoing guy, but that was based on the fact that he KNEW that we had his back, and that he had ours.
 
2012-06-24 04:42:49 PM  
Our recent experience seems to confirm what the author in TFA is saying. We do a lot of business on a contract basis for a local non-profit. They've had several chief executives in the last few years. The best one was clearly an introvert and basically left her people to do their work. The worst, and current one, is a flaming extrovert. She insists on being the center of attention at every meeting and doesn't take well to sharing the spotlight with others. The only thing that's allowed us to keep working with this organization is that the board has given us permission to set up what amounts to a satellite operation off site so we don't have to deal with the "manager".
 
2012-06-24 04:43:38 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

I get free lunches. It sounds great. In practice, I get crappy cafeteria food that probably costs my company $10 per day; and I get to spend my lunch talking about work with coworkers or sitting in front of my desk doing more work. Yippie!

And working on pet projects? Oh great - give me time to work on something I love *SO THAT YOU OWN IT*.

I can understand companies trying to get every cent they can from their employees - but I really don't understand why people seem to think it's working in their benefit. It's not. Companies are hiring smart people, letting them do million-dollar work while paying them 80k a year and owning everything they create. And if you really bust your ass - you might get a promotion into middle management or upper middle management.


I may be wrong, but you sound like you are unhappy with your job. Have you tried applying at the local Whining factory? You sound qualified.
 
2012-06-24 04:46:33 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

I get free lunches. It sounds great. In practice, I get crappy cafeteria food that probably costs my company $10 per day; and I get to spend my lunch talking about work with coworkers or sitting in front of my desk doing more work. Yippie!

And working on pet projects? Oh great - give me time to work on something I love *SO THAT YOU OWN IT*.

I can understand companies trying to get every cent they can from their employees - but I really don't understand why people seem to think it's working in their benefit. It's not. Companies are hiring smart people, letting them do million-dollar work while paying them 80k a year and owning everything they create. And if you really bust your ass - you might get a promotion into middle management or upper middle management.


Depends on where you go.

Aramark handed me a kitchen of my own, and let me do my thing. And paid bonuses for coming in under budget. And gave me better projects that got higher profile, and that carried with it, the eye of the Regional Chef. Most of the management team that handled regional were all working chefs who moved to the corporate level by way of being in the trenches.
 
2012-06-24 04:55:16 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

I get free lunches. It sounds great. In practice, I get crappy cafeteria food that probably costs my company $10 per day; and I get to spend my lunch talking about work with coworkers or sitting in front of my desk doing more work. Yippie!

And working on pet projects? Oh great - give me time to work on something I love *SO THAT YOU OWN IT*.

I can understand companies trying to get every cent they can from their employees - but I really don't understand why people seem to think it's working in their benefit. It's not. Companies are hiring smart people, letting them do million-dollar work while paying them 80k a year and owning everything they create. And if you really bust your ass - you might get a promotion into middle management or upper middle management.



You get to use company equipment, resources and the expertise from other employees of the company. Furthermore, you can always leave your company and go into your own business on your own ideas (see Intel story).
 
2012-06-24 04:57:43 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

I get free lunches. It sounds great. In practice, I get crappy cafeteria food that probably costs my company $10 per day; and I get to spend my lunch talking about work with coworkers or sitting in front of my desk doing more work. Yippie!

And working on pet projects? Oh great - give me time to work on something I love *SO THAT YOU OWN IT*.

I can understand companies trying to get every cent they can from their employees - but I really don't understand why people seem to think it's working in their benefit. It's not. Companies are hiring smart people, letting them do million-dollar work while paying them 80k a year and owning everything they create. And if you really bust your ass - you might get a promotion into middle management or upper middle management.


This is about the increasing realization that forcing people to be mindless, micromanaged cogs for 40/60/80 hours a week is not the most efficient way to get people to work. It's been shown repeatedly that working more than about 40 hours a week actually has a negative marginal productivity. And we all know that Bill Lumbergh and his negative effects weren't invented out of thin air.

In an environment where most employers still fail to recognize these things, yes it does work to your benefit to have an employer that does. If it helps them too, fine - why on earth are you biatching employers out for taking mutually beneficial courses of action?
 
2012-06-24 04:59:38 PM  
Pretty much. Tell me what you want and when you expect it, then GO AWAY. I'll come see you when I consider my work finished enough to show the customer OR if I need more information. Stop worrying, don't call me. Yes I know the deadline is coming up but your dumb managerial ass just drew my head out of the project so I could answer the phone and give you the answer you already know.
If you don't trust me enough to do the work and get it done on time, why am I in this position? You can't find anyone else who can do it better? Then GO AWAY.

\Human Machine Tool, reporting for duty
 
2012-06-24 05:20:09 PM  
FTA: " Warren Buffett is a self-described introvert who attributes his success to his temperament"

Yeah, that's bullshiat. His success is due to farking over other people then buying his way out of trouble when it happens. His name is never mentioned in the AIG scandal because he paid millions to make it go away, the problem is he made more than he paid out so its a net gain for him.
 
2012-06-24 05:27:49 PM  

Chevello: Pretty much. Tell me what you want and when you expect it, then GO AWAY. I'll come see you when I consider my work finished enough to show the customer OR if I need more information. Stop worrying, don't call me. Yes I know the deadline is coming up but your dumb managerial ass just drew my head out of the project so I could answer the phone and give you the answer you already know.
If you don't trust me enough to do the work and get it done on time, why am I in this position? You can't find anyone else who can do it better? Then GO AWAY.

\Human Machine Tool, reporting for duty


I used to hate this shiat when I was in the field, I would get called into the office for a half day meeting only to repeat what I said in emails. Usually would waste 2-3 days of work since I worked out of state most of the time.

When I finally blew up at one of the salesmen for promising something he knew we couldn't deliver the owner made it a policy not to call in field managers unless needed on another job and he fired the moronic salesman.
 
2012-06-24 05:37:35 PM  
 
2012-06-24 06:12:15 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches. It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.


OK, two things. First, if you AREN'T given time to work on other stuff, then you stagnate your skill set -- as most people lack the passion to try to learn more about their job while on the job. The people who get laid off by successful companies are the ones who flocked to a job because the company had already optimized the process to all hell to the point where it was almost automatic. Easy job = easy money. Then, once the process is fully automated and they're let go, they scream like they've just been forced to watch a Nicholas Cage movie. The people who succeed with the company take a job that was created and optimize it. But this is something you need to allocate time for outside the processed shiat, as something that isn't optimized is generally more time-intensive. See the vicious cycle? No, they're not doing you a favor, nor are they bleeding you dry. It's a very smart win-win -- the company saves money, you expand your skill set. Or are you the type that puts down "punched blue button six times a minute like a trained monkey" on your resume and then expect another company to fall over itself to hire you?

Second, most company policies regarding "we own it" generally only apply to A) time you spent on the job and B) stuff that is in direct relation to what the company does. Half the time this is really just a deterrent to prevent people like you from wasting company time or carefully plotting your betrayal; they don't like to invest their resources in your personal ambitions or in creating more competition. The other half is that they employ engineers so they'd be rightly pissed of the engineers tried to run off with the very technology they were hired to develop. Other than that? Whatever. If you write a pornographic vampire romance novel on your own time and you work for a phone company; unless they have a particularly stupid legal department, it's yours. But if you wrote the book on the clock like you're not supposed to, or use company equipment to develop better phone technology to sell yourself, yeah, they'll claim ownership. But most "pet projects" aren't necessarily that cure for cancer, anyway. It's usually a chunk of time where you're allowed to find ways to make your own job easier. If you're working 60 hours a week but you think you can find a way to cut that back to 40 without hiring more people, the company should be eager to block out the time for you to work on that solution. But most companies don't operate this way; they just crack the whip until morale improves.
 
2012-06-24 06:35:59 PM  

He_Hate_Me: The surprising truth about what motivates us (new page)


Thanks for that.
 
2012-06-24 06:45:27 PM  
If you are a sapient working on an assembly line, you are at best running in place. You can build thirty widgets one day, and your boss will ask, "Why not thirty-one widgets?" And if you do thirty-one, he wants to know why not thirty-two.

This is an awful place to be. First of all, the construction of the widgets is in itself a tiresome and boring project. To have the whipmaster peering over your shoulder every minute of the day makes it even worse. Why do we subject ourselves to this kind of nonsense?

You're probably a cockroach, except you're not as clean and you won't live as long. You will be stomped, though. It's the reason you wake up every morning.
 
2012-06-24 06:46:33 PM  
Money is not the only motivator. Autonomy, recognition, sense of accomplishment are some of the others. There's about eight.
 
2012-06-24 06:54:25 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

I get free lunches. It sounds great. In practice, I get crappy cafeteria food that probably costs my company $10 per day; and I get to spend my lunch talking about work with coworkers or sitting in front of my desk doing more work. Yippie!

And working on pet projects? Oh great - give me time to work on something I love *SO THAT YOU OWN IT*.

I can understand companies trying to get every cent they can from their employees - but I really don't understand why people seem to think it's working in their benefit. It's not. Companies are hiring smart people, letting them do million-dollar work while paying them 80k a year and owning everything they create. And if you really bust your ass - you might get a promotion into middle management or upper middle management.


Eh...your blog sucks.

I don't understand this mentality that people think they are so much more valuable than they really are. "Pet projects" is a way for a company to capitalize on human inginuity over the entire organization instead of having a short list of people make all the decisions for the everything. If you want to own your own work then start your own business. No one is FORCING you to work for a company. If you think your ideas and products are so farking brilliant and worth so much money, then market them yourself and see how well you do.
 
2012-06-24 06:54:51 PM  
I had to laugh at my boss because she told me straight out she doesn't believe people should be micromanaged, but she is the biggest meddler out there. She has to know everything that goes on and can never let you manage anything. I swear for my next performance review, under the "Things you accomplished" section, I want to write "followed my bosses' orders". She really acts as if she knows it all.
 
2012-06-24 07:02:46 PM  
They seem to follow this policy at my local McDonalds. In fact, I've never once seen a managerial act there.

They might have farked up the first part, though.
 
2012-06-24 07:04:00 PM  

He_Hate_Me: The surprising truth about what motivates us (new page)


I was expecting a different video.
 
2012-06-24 07:16:51 PM  
problem I've seen working exclusively at startups is their plan is:

1) Hire willing to learn self starter bad ass
2) After he becomes a bad ass and wants more money say "adios"
3) Go to step 1
4) Don't profit

Hiring is an investment. If you screw over your people then they are going to leave and you are never going to go anywhere, but who the fark cares about that shiat you're the CEO you made 30 mil even though you bankrupted the company
 
2012-06-24 07:30:56 PM  

He_Hate_Me: The surprising truth about what motivates us (new page)


Great video!
 
2012-06-24 07:58:49 PM  

Dear Jerk: Money is not the only motivator. Autonomy, recognition, sense of accomplishment are some of the others. There's about eight.


Pussy... You forgot to list pussy as a motivator.
 
2012-06-24 08:06:12 PM  

He_Hate_Me: The surprising truth about what motivates us (new page)


Pretty much.

Aramark made us feel appreciated for our work. Valued for it. Not a top down sort of model, but talent was given a task, and how you accomplished it, and how you presented it, that was entirely up to you. Which, for a chef, was amazingly gratifying. I turned an action station which served hot dogs and pizza, and ran with it, and by the middle of the season, I was making our own gardinera from scratch, we were doing house made sesame flat bread, braised lamb chops, and when I ran the whole club, I was given free rein to make the clubs banquets my own. Pure and simple. We went from just doing carved roasts, and set menu items, to playing with presentation, our own flourishes for every item, and a whole raft of "secret" menu items that the clubs never published, and that worked for us. We got a chance to show off a bit. Do our own food. Do our own thing, and make the club our own.

That meant a lot. That made the job, not just slinging food, but a chance to really shine. Bonuses were nice for coming in under budget, but more importantly, we got do stuff that was our own, that challenged us, that pushed us, that made us better chefs. Give folks a stake, and let them be involved, and be engaged and folks take pride in what they do. They enjoy the work more. They respect you more, because their input matters.
 
2012-06-24 08:07:45 PM  

He_Hate_Me: The surprising truth about what motivates us (new page)


This is the basis of Self-Determination Theory. I've been doing a lot of practical work with this, lately.
 
2012-06-24 08:44:13 PM  
Fark_Guy_Rob: and I get to spend my lunch talking about work with coworkers or sitting in front of my desk doing more work. Yippie!


In Theory: This is illegal in California. You can't discuss work during your mandated 30 minute lunch (or two 15 minute breaks).

In Practice: How the hell do you enforce this?

// offer not valid for salaried employees, and employees in certain fields.
 
2012-06-24 08:44:33 PM  
I'm just happy that I'm currently working at a job where I've never been screamed at.

/ then again, my boss isn't a extrovert
// ...or a sociopath
/// have worked for both of those personality types before, and those jobs were damaging to my soul....
 
2012-06-24 08:51:33 PM  
Also, I have a few pet projects, but they're so specific to how the company I work for works, that they would be useless and unmarketable outside of the company.

// building a centralized calendar, since we have locations all over the world now, different locations take different holidays. The data was all out there, you just had to check each calendar separately. When I'm done, it will all be in a data warehouse.

// and it's useless to anyone else, unless you use the same holidays (and days of observance) that we do.

// India has a ton of holidays that differ by region. It's not like the US where a holiday is basically a holiday everywhere.
 
2012-06-24 09:32:09 PM  
This is how I prefer to work. Give me my stuff, and let me finish it. I go weeks without seeing or talking to my boss, except for an email here and there. I'm happier and more productive because of it. I don't need someone holding my hand.
 
jgi
2012-06-24 10:05:16 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.


You're getting a lot of criticism in this thread about your opinion. I used to think the ideas in the article were true. And I think they are true for some people, company men. Maybe you work for Google and you're looking to go to the top in the organization and the way to do it is by innovating and letting the company have your ideas. But me, I'm tired of making other people rich.

I'm with you, Fark_Guy_Rob. Most of us don't work for Google and our innovative ideas aren't going to reward us with millions and a corner office. Most of us work for some mediocre company and if they offer us "flex time" to work on our projects, they're just going to steal the idea, give us an inflation raise, and that's it.

If you've truly got a good idea, even if it relates somehow to something your company does, work on it in your own time and do your own farkin' thing. A good lawyer will get you out of any non-compete contract. The way to true wealth is to do your own thing and you're not going to get there by giving your creativity to somebody else.
 
2012-06-24 10:12:22 PM  
It's amazing what people can accomplish when you GET THE HELL OUT OF MY WAY!

/also, not making a mess in my work area helps too.
 
2012-06-24 10:25:32 PM  
here's some food for thought. 70 per cent of American workers do not like their jobs. how's that for the "greatest country on earth"!
 
2012-06-24 10:26:14 PM  

skinink: I had to laugh at my boss because she told me straight out she doesn't believe people should be micromanaged, but she is the biggest meddler out there. She has to know everything that goes on and can never let you manage anything. I swear for my next performance review, under the "Things you accomplished" section, I want to write "followed my bosses' orders". She really acts as if she knows it all.


Every boss I hear say that makes me want to run away. They always micromanage.
 
2012-06-24 10:28:44 PM  

skinink: I had to laugh at my boss because she told me straight out she doesn't believe people should be micromanaged, but she is the biggest meddler out there. She has to know everything that goes on and can never let you manage anything. I swear for my next performance review, under the "Things you accomplished" section, I want to write "followed my bosses' orders". She really acts as if she knows it all.



i don't know if managers know it all, but Owners most certainly know it all.
 
2012-06-24 10:31:28 PM  

jgi: Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

You're getting a lot of criticism in this thread about your opinion. I used to think the ideas in the article were true. And I think they are true for some people, company men. Maybe you work for Google and you're looking to go to the top in the organization and the way to do it is by innovating and letting the company have your ideas. But me, I'm tired of making other people rich.

I'm with you, Fark_Guy_Rob. Most of us don't work for Google and our innovative ideas aren't going to reward us with millions and a corner office. Most of us work for some mediocre company and if they offer us "flex time" to work on our projects, they're just going to steal the idea, give us an inflation raise, and that's it.

If you've truly got a good idea, even if it relates somehow to something your company does, work on it in your own time and do your own farkin' thing. A good lawyer will get you out of any non-compete contract. The way to true wealth is to do your own thing and you're not going to get there by giving your creativity to somebody else.


true. if the company gets a chance to steal your ideas and then ram it up your poop shoot, they'll do it without a second thought: you are an employee.
 
2012-06-24 10:35:08 PM  

Fark Me To Tears: Dear Jerk: Money is not the only motivator. Autonomy, recognition, sense of accomplishment are some of the others. There's about eight.

Pussy... You forgot to list pussy as a motivator.


yep, chics have all the pussy and half the money. i was wondering when someone would bring that one up.
 
2012-06-24 10:37:28 PM  

hubiestubert: This was pretty much what Aramark did with the crew at Glendale Arena. We had a great crew, we weren't necessarily the clean cut folks that people imagine chefs to be, but we got things done, and we had a great time doing it, and came in under budget more times than not. Mind you, that was at Sports/Entertainment facility, as opposed to Corporate dining, and there is are certainly locations that are not as tightly run as that facility, but overall, my experience with the company was positive, because management didn't give a rat's butt HOW we did the job, just that it got done, and that we made our clients happy doing it.

That meant that we bent rules. That meant that we often pulled events off with more than what was required, and we managed to stay in budget, because we knew our inventory, we trusted the skill sets of the folks we had working, and we turned out amuse bouche and little extras out at the drop of a hat, that LOOKED complicated, but were actually pretty easy to produce, and we utilized what we had on hand pretty well.

Less about hiring introverts, than trusting your people to do their jobs. You hire folks you trust, and worry less about who gets credit, than looking at the clients' reactions. Ego IS an issue, but less about introverts and extroverts, than hiring folks who are effective. My chef at Aramark was an amazingly outgoing guy, but that was based on the fact that he KNEW that we had his back, and that he had ours.



as long as no one sh*t in the chili its all good.
 
2012-06-24 10:50:25 PM  

Balchinian: I may be wrong, but you sound like you are unhappy with your job. Have you tried applying at the local Whining factory? You sound qualified.


Your profile says you're a 'retired social psychologist'. Are you sure you don't mean FIRED? 'Cause I'm having a little trouble wrapping my head around the idea of professional psychologist who seems to be pathologically aggressive. You wouldn't be the first psychologist to end up on TruTV in an orange jumpsuit and blurry travel photos.
 
2012-06-24 10:51:59 PM  
I work for a tech company, we probably are providing you internet to your home now, yet we are the most backward environment you could imagine. Our managers have pissing matches, they micromanage and they are all fans of drama. The internal infrastructure is so bad HR and a lot of top tier executives are now called to the mad because of such bad employee reviews and the fact things have gotten so bad.

Fortunately for me I'm at a position in the company where people leave me alone, my boss and his boss, and their boss all know me directly, all know what I can do and they just leave me the fark alone because I get the job done. Not only that but I have made them look very good in the process and I continue to do that with some of the advances I have forced down everyone's throats. Our company is very very very old school and our mindset reflects that. In fact our lack of invention and creativity is about as advanced as a brain damaged victim. To me it infuriates me beyond belief because we have the chance to really move forward but no one wants to. I hate to leave the company because I have worked myself into almost a dream job situation with what I can do, people don't micromanage me, and I have your typical giant office that not many people are given, it's literally all I could want except I feel like I'm grinding myself into the ground because no one wants to create or invent or push yourself to 110%, no one wants to go beyond what they are assigned.

/sorry for the rant
//I agree with this article, leave people alone let them breathe.
 
2012-06-24 10:53:45 PM  

Linux_Yes: jgi: Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

You're getting a lot of criticism in this thread about your opinion. I used to think the ideas in the article were true. And I think they are true for some people, company men. Maybe you work for Google and you're looking to go to the top in the organization and the way to do it is by innovating and letting the company have your ideas. But me, I'm tired of making other people rich.

I'm with you, Fark_Guy_Rob. Most of us don't work for Google and our innovative ideas aren't going to reward us with millions and a corner office. Most of us work for some mediocre company and if they offer us "flex time" to work on our projects, they're just going to steal the idea, give us an inflation raise, and that's it.

If you've truly got a good idea, even if it relates somehow to something your company does, work on it in your own time and do your own farkin' thing. A good lawyer will get you out of any non-compete contract. The way to true wealth is to do your own thing and you're not going to get there by giving your creativity to somebody else.

true. if the company gets a chance to steal your ideas and then ram it up your poop shoot, they'll do it without a second thought: you are an employee.


depends what company you work for and what contracts you sign. Ours has a clause for new tech and patented items and how you can share the proceeds and money.
 
2012-06-24 11:04:47 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

I get free lunches. It sounds great. In practice, I get crappy cafeteria food that probably costs my company $10 per day; and I get to spend my lunch talking about work with coworkers or sitting in front of my desk doing more work. Yippie!

And working on pet projects? Oh great - give me time to work on something I love *SO THAT YOU OWN IT*.

I can understand companies trying to get every cent they can from their employees - but I really don't understand why people seem to think it's working in their benefit. It's not. Companies are hiring smart people, letting them do million-dollar work while paying them 80k a year and owning everything they create. And if you really bust your ass - you might get a promotion into middle management or upper middle management.




... and get shown the door when you turn 40.
 
2012-06-24 11:21:43 PM  
Also, I have a few pet projects, but they're so specific to how the company I work for works, that they would be useless and unmarketable outside of the company.
// building a centralized calendar, since we have locations all over the world now, different locations take different holidays. The data was all out there, you just had to check each calendar separately. When I'm done, it will all be in a data warehouse
// and it's useless to anyone else, unless you use the same holidays (and days of observance) that we do.
// India has a ton of holidays that differ by region. It's not like the US where a holiday is basically a holiday everywhere.


Really?
You don't think any other multinational company, or company with foreign clients would want a calender telling them what days various offices would be offline? If you make it into something where you can click on the various countries to toggle include them, this could be very useful for other people.
 
2012-06-24 11:24:31 PM  

He_Hate_Me: The surprising truth about what motivates us (new page)


Holy fark, YES. That's all I ever wanted from any job, ever:
1) Give me a reason, beyond survival
2) Make it worth my while, but not just with money, because..
3) Money is not enough, and never can be
 
2012-06-25 01:08:36 AM  

He_Hate_Me: The surprising truth about what motivates us (new page)


Thank You!!!

/enjoyed watching
//so true
 
2012-06-25 01:41:20 AM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: He_Hate_Me: The surprising truth about what motivates us (new page)

Holy fark, YES. That's all I ever wanted from any job, ever:
1) Give me a reason, beyond survival
2) Make it worth my while, but not just with money, because..
3) Money is not enough, and never can be


That guy put it much more clearly than I ever could. Made me realize that my current job gives me all that stuff... which is 'prolly why I am happy there.

/Also why I was willing to take a break from Fark to login remotely to check something on a Sunday night
 
2012-06-25 02:42:01 AM  

Linux_Yes: here's some food for thought. 70 per cent of American workers do not like their jobs. how's that for the "greatest country on earth"!


I think that's the same everywhere. I know it is a similar percentage in Australia and the UK.
 
2012-06-25 02:45:00 AM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really hate how some people seem to think their employers are doing them a favour when they allow them to work on 'pet projects' or provide perks like dry cleaning or free lunches.

It's just ANOTHER way for them to bleed you dry.

I get free lunches. It sounds great. In practice, I get crappy cafeteria food that probably costs my company $10 per day; and I get to spend my lunch talking about work with coworkers or sitting in front of my desk doing more work. Yippie!

And working on pet projects? Oh great - give me time to work on something I love *SO THAT YOU OWN IT*.

I can understand companies trying to get every cent they can from their employees - but I really don't understand why people seem to think it's working in their benefit. It's not. Companies are hiring smart people, letting them do million-dollar work while paying them 80k a year and owning everything they create. And if you really bust your ass - you might get a promotion into middle management or upper middle management.


80k what?
I've been beating this drum for less than 50k.

Sigh

/btw, you can get a seller's permit in Ca 24/7.
//'unavailable from sunday at 7pm to Monday at 5am'
 
2012-06-25 03:20:10 AM  

Forbidden Doughnut: /// have worked for both of those personality types before, and those jobs were damaging to my soul....


Yep. I worked for a tyrannical shrew of a boss that knew nothing about the day-to-day. I was fired and told that my job was redundant, then it went to three different people that take twice as long.

But I guess it was worth it to the company to not pay that juicy salary of $32K a year so that things could be run even more inefficiently.

/Been out of work for almost 9 months
//Being smart and proactive means so little to the job market and even worse, I'm never aware as to why I'm not hired
///Going stir crazy...no job and no activity makes me something something
 
2012-06-25 03:31:45 AM  
Hiring good people and leaving them alone works well so long as you only hire introverts. If you leave an extrovert alone, they'll just stomp all over your introvert employees, taking advantage of the lack of supervision to take over their projects and funding.

Proper management isn't just about telling smart people what to do, it's about telling stupid people what not to mess with.
 
2012-06-25 06:22:52 AM  
Very interesting. Thanks Subby.
 
2012-06-25 06:25:42 AM  

He_Hate_Me: The surprising truth about what motivates us (new page)


Even more interesting. Thanks HHM.
 
Displayed 50 of 62 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report