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(The Sun)   Dogs given Prozac to stop them barking. Your dog wants to chill   (thesun.co.uk ) divider line 85
    More: Stupid, Prozac, hyperactivity, mutilations, Eli Lilly  
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3717 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jun 2012 at 4:02 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-24 04:03:42 PM  
Radiator fluid works.
 
2012-06-24 04:05:06 PM  
My dog's cool, but he smokes a bag a week.
 
2012-06-24 04:08:52 PM  
Dr Corridan warned there was a risk that reliance on drugs could mean the root causes of a dog's problems were not addressed.

I had a dog whose self-chewing was blamed on behavioral problems, until I stopped feeding him anything with soy in it.
 
2012-06-24 04:09:01 PM  

Whole Wheat: Radiator fluid works.


antifreeze works best.
 
2012-06-24 04:12:49 PM  
We are through the looking glass.
 
2012-06-24 04:17:41 PM  
No... My dog doesn't bark very often. Only when he's alerting us or is trying to scare off an animal (there is a raccoon in the area he dislikes a lot). He yips a bit if I get him excited about throwing the ball with the ball chucker (thanks ancient humans for that awesome invention). He doesn't bark because he's a happy dog and not filled with anxiety.

There is no way in hell I would dope my dog up with drugs... perhaps instead of giving the people a prescription for prozac, they should give them a prescription for a dog handling/training book.
 
2012-06-24 04:18:38 PM  

Whole Wheat: Radiator fluid works.


I put water in my radiator. Yep, just pure water, laced with strychnine.
 
2012-06-24 04:21:39 PM  
i487.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-24 04:22:00 PM  

JohnnyC: There is no way in hell I would dope my dog up with drugs... perhaps instead of giving the people a prescription for prozac, they should give them a prescription for a dog handling/training book.


I agree with you in principle, except I do occasionally drug my dogs. They are both absolutely terrified of thunderstorms -- which, in Florida, in the summertime, is a nightmare. They shake, shiver, drool pant, the whole nine. Pressure vests help, but basically if I don't catch the fact that there's a storm rolling in and they start to freak before I get the vests on them, they're boned. During the longer, more violent storms, I give them Benadryl because it helps them relax and lets them nap.
 
2012-06-24 04:22:28 PM  
Dogs, cats, etc are not furniture. You need to interact with them or don't get one.
Training is necessary for dogs. They need to know their status in the family.
Know what you are feeding them. Quality food is worth it and homemade pet food isn't hard to do either.

/soapbox
 
2012-06-24 04:24:00 PM  
see everybody SSRI means "loVE!!!"
 
2012-06-24 04:26:44 PM  
That would make for the worst Cujo sequel EVER.
 
2012-06-24 04:28:07 PM  

TommyymmoT: [i487.photobucket.com image 640x480]


The one on the right is fantastically derpy. I'm in love.
 
2012-06-24 04:28:09 PM  
FTFA
"The research has prompted warnings that owners
and the veterinary industry could be "medicalising"
normal animal behaviour and providing excuses for
bad ownership.
Drug Manufacturers and the type of Vet you shouldn't take your pet to are warning of similar behavioural problems emerging in cats, rabbits and even parrots.

Its not about treating the animal, it's about how much you'll pay to treat the symptoms.
 
2012-06-24 04:28:19 PM  

JohnnyC: No... My dog doesn't bark very often. Only when he's alerting us or is trying to scare off an animal (there is a raccoon in the area he dislikes a lot). He yips a bit if I get him excited about throwing the ball with the ball chucker (thanks ancient humans for that awesome invention). He doesn't bark because he's a happy dog and not filled with anxiety.

There is no way in hell I would dope my dog up with drugs... perhaps instead of giving the people a prescription for prozac, they should give them a prescription for a dog handling/training book.


If your dog was like my neighbors, who literally hasn't shut up for the last 8 hours solid, you might reconsider that stance.

Albeit one of those shock collars that goes off when it detects the dog barking would probably do the trick in a couple weeks too. Always been more a fan of training bad behaviors away than resorting to direct restraint, chemical or otherwise. We used to train our dogs to stay away from the fence rather than tie them to a stake in the yard, too.


DrippinBalls: Anyone feeding a dog antifreeze or any poison should be shot & their worthless family should be made to watch.

/shoot them too, so they don't spawn. Better safe than sorry.


Yeah, if you need to kill an animal, just kill it. Shoot it with a gun, have a vet put it down, put it in a sack and throw it in a body of water (note: last one's more effective for cats than dogs). Something that will finish them fast. It's not like it's illegal to kill an animal and you have to fake another cause of death.
 
2012-06-24 04:30:44 PM  
My boyfriend's dog won't eat unless someone fights him for his food, and works him into a frenzy where he has this nonstop shrill bark. He's a Yorkie.

Seriously, I didn't know a dog could have such a farked up world view. He also wakes up from bad dreams lunging and biting anything or anyone around.

I would pay someone to give that dog Prozac if it made him act like a dog.


Also, it would be nice if it would help our terrified coonhound. She was abused by previous owners and is inappropriately scared of everything. A neighborhood dog bullies her (another female) and there's nothing we can do about it, short of giving our dog away. She gets so scared that she can't be left alone in bed or she pees where she sleeps. Everything online says that's basically a sign that she's scared to death and so insecure about her territory that it's a last ditch way of saying "please don't kill me while I sleep." (No urinary problems, had her completely checked out physically.)


That said, medicating normal or understandable behavior that isn't problematic for the pet is stupid and cruel. We have a deaf cat that was cranky as hell and the whole family told us to get rid of him, when really the problem was a combination of hairballs and just being deaf. The vet said deaf cats tend to be a lot more feral in nature because they're cut off socially so much more often. He really likes to be left alone and takes a very long time to warm to anyone new. My grandfather feeds all the animals when we're away from home and until recently, after years of doing this, he never even saw the cat when he visited. I'm also about the only person who can pick him up or hold him still without him freaking out, but even that has major limits.

Although I think if meds would work for him, we'd use them sometimes. Can't trim his claws. Even the vets office can't trim his nails to put on rubber tips without anesthesia, and they said anxiety meds can often have the opposite effect in cats. They know our cat by how much of a nightmare he was when we boarded him there in the past. Great vet, other pets have all been fine. Its just him.
 
2012-06-24 04:33:04 PM  

Jim_Callahan: Albeit one of those shock collars that goes off when it detects the dog barking would probably do the trick in a couple weeks too. Always been more a fan of training bad behaviors away than resorting to direct restraint, chemical or otherwise. We used to train our dogs to stay away from the fence rather than tie them to a stake in the yard, too.


One of my babies is a nuisance barker. I had to revoke his access to the screen porch because he would just sit out there and bark for hours at anything that moved. I feel a little guilty making him stay inside, but goddamn if I can stand hearing him bark constantly.

I bought one of those bark-off things -- it's a little plastic contraption that sits on the counter and supposedly emits an annoying noise that is something like the old school snow on a not-connected TV. (My brother and best friend swear they can hear it, but I can't.) Be damned if it did anything but make Simon bark more.
 
2012-06-24 04:34:34 PM  

pounddawg: Whole Wheat: Radiator fluid works.

antifreeze works best.


Meh. Use the old stuff when you change it out. Save the new stuff for the radiator.

/I keed/

However, after being kept up night after night be my dipshiat neighbor's dog, the thought has crossed my mind. But in the end, Mr. Yappy is just a dog with a dipshiat owner.
 
2012-06-24 04:35:05 PM  

doloresonthedottedline: A neighborhood dog bullies her (another female) and there's nothing we can do about it, short of giving our dog away.


Well there is something you could do. Not let your dog out of your house except on a leash, for example.
 
2012-06-24 04:35:21 PM  
My vet gave antidepressant meds my 2 cats. FIrst one was aggressive and got a tricyclic antidepressant for a week and he was fixed from his dominating behavior. The 2nd was a ssri/snri for my cat with renal failure to increase his appetite. Each only needed 1 week or so to have their brain chemistry corrected and no more meds were needed.
 
2012-06-24 04:35:43 PM  

kellynoel: I agree with you in principle, except I do occasionally drug my dogs. They are both absolutely terrified of thunderstorms


My dog doesn't like storms either. He just hides under my desk or has to sit right next to me (as in touching my foot or something). I can completely understand how dogs could be upset by storms, probably some latent instinct thing to seek shelter or something.

I'm not even sure what a pressure vest is for a dog or what they do (I'll have to look that up), but if your dogs absolutely freak from storms, I could understand giving them a little something to calm them down temporarily. I think my statement was more about constant drugging of the dog instead of training the bad behavior away by replacing the response with a good behavior, not as much about a once in a while downer.

I mean... who couldn't use a downer once in a while (mmmm beer)? :)
 
2012-06-24 04:36:30 PM  

Whole Wheat: However, after being kept up night after night be my dipshiat neighbor's dog, the thought has crossed my mind. But in the end, Mr. Yappy is just a dog with a dipshiat owner.


My barker-jerk used to get going the instant the sun rose. I always felt awful for my neighbors. I am glad I got that sheet under control.
 
2012-06-24 04:38:34 PM  

DrippinBalls: Anyone feeding a dog antifreeze or any poison should be shot & their worthless family should be made to watch.

/shoot them too, so they don't spawn. Better safe than sorry.


Fine. Live next to my neighbor who leaves his dog out running loose all night long. Irresponsible dog owners should have their heads mounted on truncheons and whatever else you said.
 
2012-06-24 04:39:05 PM  

JohnnyC: My dog doesn't like storms either. He just hides under my desk or has to sit right next to me (as in touching my foot or something). I can completely understand how dogs could be upset by storms, probably some latent instinct thing to seek shelter or something.

I'm not even sure what a pressure vest is for a dog or what they do (I'll have to look that up), but if your dogs absolutely freak from storms, I could understand giving them a little something to calm them down temporarily. I think my statement was more about constant drugging of the dog instead of training the bad behavior away by replacing the response with a good behavior, not as much about a once in a while downer.

I mean... who couldn't use a downer once in a while (mmmm beer)? :)


Do look up the pressure vest. It might help your guy get through storms. However, my best friend's dogs (same breed as mine) are the same as mine in that if you wait too long to get them on (i.e. the barometric pressure has already changed), they don't work.

I really only give them Benadryl if it's going to be storming for longer than an hour or two. It just seems cruel to let them suffer like that, when a lick of chunky peanut butter with a pill slipped in can let them sleep through it.
 
2012-06-24 04:42:07 PM  

kellynoel: JohnnyC: There is no way in hell I would dope my dog up with drugs... perhaps instead of giving the people a prescription for prozac, they should give them a prescription for a dog handling/training book.

I agree with you in principle, except I do occasionally drug my dogs. They are both absolutely terrified of thunderstorms -- which, in Florida, in the summertime, is a nightmare. They shake, shiver, drool pant, the whole nine. Pressure vests help, but basically if I don't catch the fact that there's a storm rolling in and they start to freak before I get the vests on them, they're boned. During the longer, more violent storms, I give them Benadryl because it helps them relax and lets them nap.


I have a 13 year old basset/lab mix that is also absolutely terrified of thunderstorms. She trembles from head to toe, so much so that you can see her shaking from across the room. Of course, it got a lot worse after the tornadoes here in north Georgia last year. The vet gave me some Xanax to give her when we're likely to have severe storms. It really helps a lot.

I don't give it to her often but I can't stand to see her suffer so much. She's an old lady dog and who knows how much fear her heart can stand?

As for sedating a dog to get it to stop barking, that's just lazy.
 
2012-06-24 04:42:23 PM  

kellynoel: doloresonthedottedline: A neighborhood dog bullies her (another female) and there's nothing we can do about it, short of giving our dog away.

Well there is something you could do. Not let your dog out of your house except on a leash, for example.


Dude. Shes a coonhound. There are no dog parks in Appalachia. She'd chew the house down.

When she's outside, she runs the full length of the street full speed in laps for hours straight. That dog has more energy than any creature I've seen in my life.

And the neighbors dog would still come after her while she was on a leash because there's no way to make the neighbors dog stay away from our property.


But I am totally open to any advice for a super antisocial deaf cat who we'd love to keep rubber claw tips on, or for an absolutely terrified but otherwise happy, very high energy Walker coonhound.
 
2012-06-24 04:43:21 PM  

DrippinBalls: Anyone feeding a dog antifreeze or any poison should be shot & their worthless family should be made to watch.

/shoot them too, so they don't spawn. Better safe than sorry.


This. The neighbor's dog barks all the time, but I would never poison or torture it.
 
2012-06-24 04:46:05 PM  

kellynoel:
I really only give them Benadryl if it's going to be storming for longer than an hour or two. It just seems cruel to let them suffer like that, when a lick of chunky peanut butter with a pill slipped in can let them sleep through it.


According to my dog's vet, benadryl has limited effectiveness in dogs (at least for allergies - the reason we asked).
 
2012-06-24 04:46:43 PM  

notyomama: I have a 13 year old basset/lab mix that is also absolutely terrified of thunderstorms. She trembles from head to toe, so much so that you can see her shaking from across the room. Of course, it got a lot worse after the tornadoes here in north Georgia last year. The vet gave me some Xanax to give her when we're likely to have severe storms. It really helps a lot.

I don't give it to her often but I can't stand to see her suffer so much. She's an old lady dog and who knows how much fear her heart can stand?

As for sedating a dog to get it to stop barking, that's just lazy.


I tried Xanax for them. It worked, of course, but they were a bit dopey long after I felt like it should have worn off. With the Benadryl, they aren't out of it for nearly as long.
 
2012-06-24 04:47:48 PM  
My dog was jumped by another dog when she was at the pound. According to her vet she was a very sweet girl towards everyone before she was surrendered. Now she is afraid of big dogs and people she doesnt know/

Turns out she has a bladder problem and low thyroid. The meds make her more nervous She is also on a anti anxiety pill. it was getting to the point where I was going to have to put her down
 
2012-06-24 04:48:41 PM  

Tentacle: According to my dog's vet, benadryl has limited effectiveness in dogs (at least for allergies - the reason we asked).


Yeah, they don't take it for allergies. Just to help them relax. The youngest one -- the barker, in fact -- has allergies. The only thing that helps him is Prednisone.
 
2012-06-24 04:48:56 PM  

kellynoel: Jim_Callahan: Albeit one of those shock collars that goes off when it detects the dog barking would probably do the trick in a couple weeks too. Always been more a fan of training bad behaviors away than resorting to direct restraint, chemical or otherwise. We used to train our dogs to stay away from the fence rather than tie them to a stake in the yard, too.

One of my babies is a nuisance barker. I had to revoke his access to the screen porch because he would just sit out there and bark for hours at anything that moved. I feel a little guilty making him stay inside, but goddamn if I can stand hearing him bark constantly.

I bought one of those bark-off things -- it's a little plastic contraption that sits on the counter and supposedly emits an annoying noise that is something like the old school snow on a not-connected TV. (My brother and best friend swear they can hear it, but I can't.) Be damned if it did anything but make Simon bark more.


Muzzle it -
www.all-about-pitbull-dog-breed.com

Oops, my bad. I meant on of these -
www.dogsupplies.com

Every time the dog is on the porch, warn the dog once when it first barks. After the second bark the muzzle stays on till its time to go back inside.

My mutt goes to work with me so manners/good behavior are mandatory.
 
2012-06-24 04:50:34 PM  

Boatmech: Muzzle it -
www.all-about-pitbull-dog-breed.com

Oops, my bad. I meant on of these -
www.dogsupplies.com

Every time the dog is on the porch, warn the dog once when it first barks. After the second bark the muzzle stays on till its time to go back inside.

My mutt goes to work with me so manners/good behavior are mandatory.


I have one of those -- the latter, not the former, which grosses me the fark out -- but we try not to use it. I guess I feel better about keeping him inside than I do about keeping him muzzled.
 
2012-06-24 04:51:03 PM  
Yes, you should stop them barking.
 
2012-06-24 04:53:56 PM  

kellynoel: doloresonthedottedline: A neighborhood dog bullies her (another female) and there's nothing we can do about it, short of giving our dog away.

Well there is something you could do. Not let your dog out of your house except on a leash, for example.


Breed description, exercise needs, from Wikipedia:

"Treeing Walker Coonhounds are not for owners without substantial time for exercise and training. If the hound is kept as a pet and not been trained for hunting, even the most loving, well-behaved Walker cannot be allowed off-leash in an area without a high fence. Their "treeing" behavior makes them capable of scaling fences in excess of 6 feet (1.8 m). A secure yard alone will not provide the long walks, intense exercise, and "adventures" they require. Their nature is to run freely and for great distances, and they are oblivious to commands when trailing a scent, much like a beagle or basset hound. Chasing after them provokes the pack-hunting response, and faster running. Strays are often found to have wandered as much as 50 miles from home in a relatively short time. On-leash hikes in a variety of settings are needed for a Walker kept as a pet, as well as the opportunity to run hard off-leash in a confined space."

I'm fairly certain she's purebred--regardless, she's dead on for the breed descriptions I've read. And we didn't chose to own her, really, she adopted us and we're crazy about her now. That said, if we knew someone who could provide for her better and more safely, we would strongly consider it, but back home the only people with enough land for her to run without packs of dogs for her to deal with usually live near a busy highway.
 
2012-06-24 04:54:28 PM  
This dog needs Zanax.

http://youtu.be/9fIyW6qPMRA
 
2012-06-24 04:56:17 PM  

kellynoel: Do look up the pressure vest. It might help your guy get through storms.


Those are cool and it makes some good sense. Interesting too.

Jeb, my husky/golden lab mutt, doesn't really get that bad. He doesn't shake or anything, mostly he just pants and wants to hang out under the desk. It was worse at our last place which had a metal roof that really carried the sound of the rain. But even then it was still just the hide under the desk (I'm at my computer a lot), or he makes sure he's touching me.
 
2012-06-24 04:57:49 PM  
hotoffpress.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-06-24 05:00:06 PM  

Boatmech: My mutt goes to work with me so manners/good behavior are mandatory.


That's very cool that you are able to take your dog to work with you. I bet you and your dog have a really tight bond. :)

I work from home, so I'm around my dog a whole lot too.
 
2012-06-24 05:00:51 PM  

doloresonthedottedline: My boyfriend's dog won't eat unless someone fights him for his food, and works him into a frenzy where he has this nonstop shrill bark. He's a Yorkie.


Sounds like a problem that will take care of itself. If the dog is too stupid to eat I'm not gonna force him.
 
2012-06-24 05:02:39 PM  
My family used to have a cat who was on anti-depressants. My mom was always embarrassed when picking up the prescription.
 
2012-06-24 05:07:42 PM  

kellynoel: JohnnyC: There is no way in hell I would dope my dog up with drugs... perhaps instead of giving the people a prescription for prozac, they should give them a prescription for a dog handling/training book.

I agree with you in principle, except I do occasionally drug my dogs. They are both absolutely terrified of thunderstorms -- which, in Florida, in the summertime, is a nightmare. They shake, shiver, drool pant, the whole nine. Pressure vests help, but basically if I don't catch the fact that there's a storm rolling in and they start to freak before I get the vests on them, they're boned. During the longer, more violent storms, I give them Benadryl because it helps them relax and lets them nap.


I am thinking of trying on of these this July 4th.

Same thing with Suzy. We don't get a lot of thunder storms here but we are surrounded by folks that light off fireworks. I have tried tryptophane (sp?) but it didn't do anything. The reviews I've seen have been very mixed.

How much of a difference does it make?
 
2012-06-24 05:08:42 PM  
Dr Corridan warned there was a risk that reliance on drugs could mean the root causes of a dog's problems were not addressed.

Huh...could that not also apply to people? It's shocking how overprescrived anti-depressants are.
 
2012-06-24 05:09:52 PM  

doloresonthedottedline: kellynoel: doloresonthedottedline: A neighborhood dog bullies her (another female) and there's nothing we can do about it, short of giving our dog away.

Well there is something you could do. Not let your dog out of your house except on a leash, for example.


Wish people with kids would follow this advice as well.
r27.imgfast.net

Dude. She's a coonhound. There are no dog parks in Appalachia. She'd chew the house down.

When she's outside, she runs the full length of the street full speed in laps for hours straight. That dog has more energy than any creature I've seen in my life.

And the neighbors dog would still come after her while she was on a leash because there's no way to make the neighbors dog stay away from our property.


But I am totally open to any advice for a super antisocial deaf cat who we'd love to keep rubber claw tips on, or for an absolutely terrified but otherwise happy, very high energy Walker coonhound.


If you're crazy enough you can try the Alpha Dog Thing.
When the neighbours dog starts going after your dog run up an scare/beat/whatever the hell out of the neighbors dog.
/if it doesn't work it will at least give the other neighbors something to talk about
;=)
 
2012-06-24 05:14:33 PM  

kellynoel: Boatmech: Muzzle it -
www.all-about-pitbull-dog-breed.com

Oops, my bad. I meant on of these -
www.dogsupplies.com

Every time the dog is on the porch, warn the dog once when it first barks. After the second bark the muzzle stays on till its time to go back inside.

My mutt goes to work with me so manners/good behavior are mandatory.

I have one of those -- the latter, not the former, which grosses me the fark out -- but we try not to use it. I guess I feel better about keeping him inside than I do about keeping him muzzled.


.......no bad dogs, just bad owners.....
.
.
.
/truely crazy dogs excepted
 
2012-06-24 05:15:03 PM  

Salem Witch: I am thinking of trying on of these this July 4th.

Same thing with Suzy. We don't get a lot of thunder storms here but we are surrounded by folks that light off fireworks. I have tried tryptophane (sp?) but it didn't do anything. The reviews I've seen have been very mixed.

How much of a difference does it make?


Fireworks are a nightmare for my babies too. The pressure vests help a lot, particularly with the shaking and panting. The drooling, not so much. When they wear the vests for storms, they generally just lay down and close their eyes. I paid about 30 bucks for each vest, and it was worth every penny the very first time I used them.
 
2012-06-24 05:17:46 PM  

Boatmech: doloresonthedottedline: kellynoel: doloresonthedottedline: A neighborhood dog bullies her (another female) and there's nothing we can do about it, short of giving our dog away.

Well there is something you could do. Not let your dog out of your house except on a leash, for example.

Wish people with kids would follow this advice as well.


Dude. She's a coonhound. There are no dog parks in Appalachia. She'd chew the house down.

When she's outside, she runs the full length of the street full speed in laps for hours straight. That dog has more energy than any creature I've seen in my life.

And the neighbors dog would still come after her while she was on a leash because there's no way to make the neighbors dog stay away from our property.


But I am totally open to any advice for a super antisocial deaf cat who we'd love to keep rubber claw tips on, or for an absolutely terrified but otherwise happy, very high energy Walker coonhound.

If you're crazy enough you can try the Alpha Dog Thing.
When the neighbours dog starts going after your dog run up an scare/beat/whatever the hell out of the neighbors dog.
/if it doesn't work it will at least give the other neighbors something to talk about
;=)


This sort of happened on its own once. Our treeing walker treed herself chasing a cat downhill--lept into a tree with the cat and then was too scared to jump down. Was in a tree on the border of the other dog's property for hours crying, middle of the night. Had to have a cousin come cut his way to her and lift her down. As soon as she was on the ground, the other dog came out of nowhere and fought to kill.

I've since read up on ways to diffuse a dog fight like that, but at the time I didn't even know what I was doing. Apparently I just started beating and kicking and pulling and hitting her with the hoe my cousin had used, and telling him to do the same, and screaming. This seriously wasn't a dominance fight. She had her throat and was trying to grab and shake. Broke the hoe over the other dog's back. A cop we'd called because we had to technically trespass (neighbor wasn't home, guy is kinda crazy) came running and was beating the other dog with his flashlight.

Took FOREVER but the other dog finally ran home with her tail between her legs and wouldn't come toward our house for a long time. She's super sweet toward people though and was almost like our dog before the fight, though (very likely the problem), and I can't keep my Mom from still petting her sometimes. Having to be mean and chase her off all the time is even hard on me, though. They haven't fought quite like that since, and our hound has had more confidence in chasing her off, but I'm fairly certain if she's ever weakened again, the situation will repeat.
 
2012-06-24 05:21:36 PM  
We had to have our dog on Reconcile for a period of time because of separation anxiety. Say what you will, but I have absolutely no qualms about using a medicine at my disposal to help her have some improved quality of life until we worked past her problem.

The results from training don't just happen over night.

We had a lot of issues with her, but we do everything humanly possible to work with her. Unfortunately, that meant having her on basket case dog drugs for a while. It's just important to exhaust your other options first, and to use it as a temporary symptom reliever, instead of a permanent or easy solution. I have the feeling not many other people do that.

We got a dog because we wanted a dog, and getting rid of her is not an option.
 
2012-06-24 05:21:58 PM  

astouffer: doloresonthedottedline: My boyfriend's dog won't eat unless someone fights him for his food, and works him into a frenzy where he has this nonstop shrill bark. He's a Yorkie.

Sounds like a problem that will take care of itself. If the dog is too stupid to eat I'm not gonna force him.


My thoughts exactly. But obviously since they let the dog develop into this screwed up mess, they aren't willing to do that. I think his mom thinks it's cute. The dog freaks out if anyone has food near him, they buy him fortune cookies to use as toys and no one else can eat them without him having a fit, and he freaks when the boyfriend is called to eat.

If I ever end up having to take care of it, the dog will go hungry for awhile and probably be on Benadryl or something stronger, though.
 
2012-06-24 05:22:56 PM  

kellynoel: I agree with you in principle, except I do occasionally drug my dogs. They are both absolutely terrified of thunderstorms -- which, in Florida, in the summertime, is a nightmare. They shake, shiver, drool pant, the whole nine. Pressure vests help, but basically if I don't catch the fact that there's a storm rolling in and they start to freak before I get the vests on them, they're boned. During the longer, more violent storms, I give them Benadryl because it helps them relax and lets them nap.


This. Our rescue dog is prescribed an anti-anxiety med, which she gets as needed during storm and fireworks season. It doesn't knock her out, but it's generally more effective than the Benadryl, which just doesn't last that long with her. She really freaks out when it comes to loud, booming noises. If she has a human friend with her it helps, but alone (if everyone is off at work, say) she can be destructive and self-destructive trying to escape. (She has lost teeth trying to gnaw her way out of the garage, which the dogs used to get full run of when not in the house, until they finished off the old garage door. And then there was the kitchen incident...)

The meds have definitely helped. I'll look into pressure vests, too.
 
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