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(CBS News)   Acre of Genetically Modified Grass kills herd of cattle through the very unexpected synthesis of cyanide gas. Cow slaughter thought to be self-defense and USDA is now dissecting the grass looking for mutations and gas generating organs   (cbsnews.com) divider line 125
    More: Scary, farming, cow slaughter, Central Texas, herds, mutants, organs, cattle, grasshoppers  
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8519 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 Jun 2012 at 4:32 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-23 11:06:54 PM
goddamnit. i hate it when m. night shamylan is right.
 
2012-06-23 11:32:48 PM
Damn.
 
2012-06-23 11:35:13 PM
I'm no farmer but from what I've read Tifton 85 is actually just a breed of grass, not a genetically modified grass.
 
2012-06-24 12:26:05 AM
After being in the field for 15 years it suddenly releases large amounts of cyanide gas? Not going to say that's impossible, but it seems unlikely. At a minimum I would be looking for some radical change in conditions to begin to provide a rational explanation how plants could suddenly radically change their behavior. And I'd want to know how concentrations of cyanide gas high enough to kill 800lb cows somehow did not affect at all the people running around trying to help them.
 
2012-06-24 12:51:54 AM

vossiewulf: After being in the field for 15 years it suddenly releases large amounts of cyanide gas? Not going to say that's impossible, but it seems unlikely. At a minimum I would be looking for some radical change in conditions to begin to provide a rational explanation how plants could suddenly radically change their behavior. And I'd want to know how concentrations of cyanide gas high enough to kill 800lb cows somehow did not affect at all the people running around trying to help them.


Yeah, something is weird with this.
 
2012-06-24 12:59:00 AM

vossiewulf: After being in the field for 15 years it suddenly releases large amounts of cyanide gas? Not going to say that's impossible, but it seems unlikely. At a minimum I would be looking for some radical change in conditions to begin to provide a rational explanation how plants could suddenly radically change their behavior. And I'd want to know how concentrations of cyanide gas high enough to kill 800lb cows somehow did not affect at all the people running around trying to help them.


I'm not saying that something isn't off here, because it certainly sounds like it is. But cows eat the grass meaning they keep their faces and snouts basically in the grass. Humans don't tend to walk around with their noses in the grass.
 
2012-06-24 01:14:01 AM

WorldCitizen: vossiewulf: After being in the field for 15 years it suddenly releases large amounts of cyanide gas? Not going to say that's impossible, but it seems unlikely. At a minimum I would be looking for some radical change in conditions to begin to provide a rational explanation how plants could suddenly radically change their behavior. And I'd want to know how concentrations of cyanide gas high enough to kill 800lb cows somehow did not affect at all the people running around trying to help them.

I'm not saying that something isn't off here, because it certainly sounds like it is. But cows eat the grass meaning they keep their faces and snouts basically in the grass. Humans don't tend to walk around with their noses in the grass.


I'm going with "I'm not saying it's aliens, but it's aliens"
 
2012-06-24 01:17:20 AM

WorldCitizen: vossiewulf: After being in the field for 15 years it suddenly releases large amounts of cyanide gas? Not going to say that's impossible, but it seems unlikely. At a minimum I would be looking for some radical change in conditions to begin to provide a rational explanation how plants could suddenly radically change their behavior. And I'd want to know how concentrations of cyanide gas high enough to kill 800lb cows somehow did not affect at all the people running around trying to help them.

I'm not saying that something isn't off here, because it certainly sounds like it is. But cows eat the grass meaning they keep their faces and snouts basically in the grass. Humans don't tend to walk around with their noses in the grass.


I took it to mean the cyanide gas was concentrated in the stomachs of the cows -a process of their unique digestion.
 
2012-06-24 01:52:59 AM
I took it to mean the cyanide gas was concentrated in the stomachs of the cows -a process of their unique digestion.

Now that makes sense. Invoke google-fu:

"Prussic acid is formally known as hydrocyanic acid, and as the name implies, is a cyanide-containing compound. It is only produced by certain plants, but under conditions of plant stress, those plants can produce the problem. Cattle ingest the plant, and during the process of digestion the cyanide compound is released." Link
 
2012-06-24 01:56:57 AM
Thus, it begins.

www.therealstevegray.com
 
2012-06-24 02:13:37 AM

vossiewulf: I took it to mean the cyanide gas was concentrated in the stomachs of the cows -a process of their unique digestion.

Now that makes sense. Invoke google-fu:

"Prussic acid is formally known as hydrocyanic acid, and as the name implies, is a cyanide-containing compound. It is only produced by certain plants, but under conditions of plant stress, those plants can produce the problem. Cattle ingest the plant, and during the process of digestion the cyanide compound is released." Link


Ah, yes, that makes even more sense.
 
2012-06-24 02:46:22 AM
Damn you all for being all rational and whatnot, I was looking for an excuse not to cut my grass tomorrow (err, later today).
 
2012-06-24 03:04:06 AM

WorldCitizen: vossiewulf: I took it to mean the cyanide gas was concentrated in the stomachs of the cows -a process of their unique digestion.

Now that makes sense. Invoke google-fu:

"Prussic acid is formally known as hydrocyanic acid, and as the name implies, is a cyanide-containing compound. It is only produced by certain plants, but under conditions of plant stress, those plants can produce the problem. Cattle ingest the plant, and during the process of digestion the cyanide compound is released." Link

Ah, yes, that makes even more sense.


But it doesn't answer an important question: why now? Why these cows? Why this field? Who knows, maybe the drought had something to do with it...
 
2012-06-24 03:24:20 AM
Follow up: hippies planted (no pun intended) the gas because:
1) discredit GMOs
2) poisoned cows means less people eating beef
 
2012-06-24 03:43:09 AM
images.icanhascheezburger.com
 
2012-06-24 04:01:56 AM

Paris1127: WorldCitizen: vossiewulf: I took it to mean the cyanide gas was concentrated in the stomachs of the cows -a process of their unique digestion.

Now that makes sense. Invoke google-fu:

"Prussic acid is formally known as hydrocyanic acid, and as the name implies, is a cyanide-containing compound. It is only produced by certain plants, but under conditions of plant stress, those plants can produce the problem. Cattle ingest the plant, and during the process of digestion the cyanide compound is released." Link

Ah, yes, that makes even more sense.

But it doesn't answer an important question: why now? Why these cows? Why this field? Who knows, maybe the drought had something to do with it...


Here's the thing about random chance: It doesn't care what you think is likely.

The basic proposal is that if something is possible, it either has happened or it will eventually happen - given enough time.

Roy Sullivan was struck by lightning 7 times. Weird stuff happens. Just because it's unlikely doesn't mean it aint gonna.

And yeah the drought probably had something to do with it.
 
2012-06-24 05:04:11 AM
Asa Phelps: Roy Sullivan was struck by lightning 7 times.

Did he really get struck by lightining, or did he really just get hit by the splash damage, IE, the lightning hits the ground near where he's standing. The lightning hits a tree and arcs to him, etc.
 
2012-06-24 05:36:16 AM

Krymson Tyde: WorldCitizen: vossiewulf: After being in the field for 15 years it suddenly releases large amounts of cyanide gas? Not going to say that's impossible, but it seems unlikely. At a minimum I would be looking for some radical change in conditions to begin to provide a rational explanation how plants could suddenly radically change their behavior. And I'd want to know how concentrations of cyanide gas high enough to kill 800lb cows somehow did not affect at all the people running around trying to help them.

I'm not saying that something isn't off here, because it certainly sounds like it is. But cows eat the grass meaning they keep their faces and snouts basically in the grass. Humans don't tend to walk around with their noses in the grass.

I'm going with "I'm not saying it's aliens, but it's aliens"


Nah... the cattle were still right side in.
 
2012-06-24 05:37:06 AM
This is exactly the sort of shiat I do not like to read first thing in the morning.
 
2012-06-24 05:48:33 AM
www.monologuedb.com

If there is one thing the history of evolution has taught us it's that life will not be contained. Life breaks free, expands to new territories, and crashes through barriers, painfully, maybe even dangerously, but, ah, well, there it is.

Oh, and copypaste that monologue about adaptation in the plant world.
 
2012-06-24 06:16:37 AM
FTA...

"The grasshoppers are enjoying it now," he said.
null null null

/lolwut?
 
2012-06-24 06:19:07 AM

jtown: [www.monologuedb.com image 150x150]

If there is one thing the history of evolution has taught us it's that life will not be contained. Life breaks free, expands to new territories, and crashes through barriers, painfully, maybe even dangerously, but, ah, well, there it is.

Oh, and copypaste that monologue about adaptation in the plant world.


Oh, don't be silly. There's no way that clever-ass Man could ever screw up messing around with shiat he doesn't understand.
 
2012-06-24 06:20:42 AM
FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:F W:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:
 
2012-06-24 06:27:20 AM
i'm surprised Monsanto permitted that article to be printed...
 
2012-06-24 06:32:39 AM
I wanted to submit this earlier, but damn it, sometimes we're so hung up on funny headlines that serious stuff doesn't get through all that often.

BTW, 70% of our food is GMO. In Europe, less than 05% (and after they get a load of this, that'll go down to zero).
 
2012-06-24 06:40:56 AM
And the rest of the world was derided for being suspicious of frankenfood. Apparently americans are to be the guinea pigs in the experiments.
 
2012-06-24 06:47:32 AM

Weaver95: i'm surprised Monsanto permitted that article to be printed...


Monsanto doesn't have anything to do with the grass in question.

aearra: And the rest of the world was derided for being suspicious of frankenfood.


The grass in question is no different from many other varieties of grass where two varieties are crossed by natural means. It's just a straight up hybrid of two existing grass varieties.
 
2012-06-24 06:50:57 AM

Coelacanth: (and after they get a load of this, that'll go down to zero)


A little googling found something interesting, the grass in question is part Bermuda grass and Bermuda grass is high in hydrocyanic acid. Given the recent drought in Texas it may have had a higher than normal amount of the acid, and when the grass got in the cows' stomachs say good night Gracie.
 
2012-06-24 07:23:51 AM

WhyteRaven74: Coelacanth: (and after they get a load of this, that'll go down to zero)

A little googling found something interesting, the grass in question is part Bermuda grass and Bermuda grass is high in hydrocyanic acid. Given the recent drought in Texas it may have had a higher than normal amount of the acid, and when the grass got in the cows' stomachs say good night Gracie.


I grew up in east Texas - my family raised beef cattle. We fed both fresh and dry alfalfa, bermuda, and love grass, at all seasons, and thoughout the drought of the fifties. I have never heard of anything like this happening.
Google shows no incidents other than this one. Bullshiat. I am calling it.
 
2012-06-24 07:25:58 AM

vossiewulf: After being in the field for 15 years it suddenly releases large amounts of cyanide gas? Not going to say that's impossible, but it seems unlikely. At a minimum I would be looking for some radical change in conditions to begin to provide a rational explanation how plants could suddenly radically change their behavior. And I'd want to know how concentrations of cyanide gas high enough to kill 800lb cows somehow did not affect at all the people running around trying to help them.


This.

But it will now be forever spread as truth in anti-GM-Foods hysteria, no matter what the outcome of this, if it is even reported.

Story done, time for the next chicken little. GM of course.
 
2012-06-24 07:33:42 AM

WhyteRaven74: Coelacanth: (and after they get a load of this, that'll go down to zero)

A little googling found something interesting, the grass in question is part Bermuda grass and Bermuda grass is high in hydrocyanic acid. Given the recent drought in Texas it may have had a higher than normal amount of the acid, and when the grass got in the cows' stomachs say good night Gracie.


One of my brothers and his family lives in Texas. I just left him a message not to let the kids play in the grass until a few more voices pipe in on this I hope he doesn't freak.

The big problem here is that GMOs hybridize like crazy according to my sources. In Mexico, Monsanto had some fields of some variety of Biocorn. The Mexican army had to go with flamethrowers to get rid of the stuff because the pollen was endangering Monarch butterflies and that heirloom corn crops were becoming Biocorn crops.

I'm still looking for a mention of the flamethrowers online. About five or six years ago, the story was all over the place, but now *shrugs*.

One concern of mine is that GMO corporations like to use the same patented genes over and over again. Today it's grass. Tomorrow will it be tomatoes or strawberries? And the whole country is in a drought condition. What's next? Farm workers keeling over in the fields?
 
2012-06-24 07:35:05 AM

jso2897: I grew up in east Texas - my family raised beef cattle. We fed both fresh and dry alfalfa, bermuda, and love grass, at all seasons, and thoughout the drought of the fifties. I have never heard of anything like this happening.
Google shows no incidents other than this one. Bullshiat. I am calling it.


Where did you get your grass?
 
2012-06-24 07:35:12 AM
This is NOT a genetically modified grass!!!!

http://www.examiner.com/article/gmo-food-hybrid-poison-grass-that-kil l s-texas-cattle-not-genetically-modified
 
2012-06-24 07:41:37 AM

Coelacanth: The big problem here is that GMOs hybridize like crazy according to my sources.


The grass in question is sterile, and isn't a GMO it's just a regular hybrid.
 
2012-06-24 07:47:37 AM

Krymson Tyde: WorldCitizen: vossiewulf: After being in the field for 15 years it suddenly releases large amounts of cyanide gas? Not going to say that's impossible, but it seems unlikely. At a minimum I would be looking for some radical change in conditions to begin to provide a rational explanation how plants could suddenly radically change their behavior. And I'd want to know how concentrations of cyanide gas high enough to kill 800lb cows somehow did not affect at all the people running around trying to help them.

I'm not saying that something isn't off here, because it certainly sounds like it is. But cows eat the grass meaning they keep their faces and snouts basically in the grass. Humans don't tend to walk around with their noses in the grass.

I'm going with "I'm not saying it's aliens chupacabra farts, but it's aliens chupacabra farts"

 
2012-06-24 07:59:39 AM

Coelacanth: The big problem here is that GMOs hybridize like crazy according to my sources.


The anti-GMO movement is often motivated by fear, informed by fallacy, and driven by hysteria. More at 11.
 
2012-06-24 08:08:48 AM
Many plants can produce cyanide-containing compounds. Link but the animals are poisoned when they eat the plant, not by release of cyanide gas. Even the original, poorly written article acknowledges that the cows were poisoned by eating the grass but somehow that turns into release of cyanide gas by the end of the article.
 
2012-06-24 08:10:30 AM

jso2897:
I grew up in east Texas - my family raised beef cattle. We fed both fresh and dry alfalfa, bermuda, and love grass, at all seasons, and thoughout the drought of the fifties. I have never heard of anything like this happening.
Google shows no incidents other than this one. Bullshiat. I am calling it.


Prussic acid poisoning with forage plants



Plants with Cyanogenic Potential
------------------------------------------------
Apple Johnsongrass
Apricot Lima bean
Arrow Grass Peach
Birdsfoot trefoil Poison suckleya
Cherry Sudangrass hybrids
Elderberry Sorghum-sudangrass hybrids
Flax Shattercane
Forage Sorghums Velvet grass
Grain Sorghums Vetch seed
Hydrangea White Clover
Indiangrass


I wouldn't rule that (or another plant) out just yet.
 
2012-06-24 08:19:18 AM

ZipSplat: Coelacanth: The big problem here is that GMOs hybridize like crazy according to my sources.

The anti-GMO movement is often motivated by fear, informed by fallacy, and driven by hysteria. More at 11.


PLONK

And the pro-GMO suits are motivated by profits.
 
2012-06-24 08:21:56 AM
Texas extension service report on forage problems seems to suggest nitrate poisoning is possible in a drought:

"Normally, plants reduce nitrates to ammonium ions
and then assimilate them into amino acids and other proteins.
This process, called nitrate reductase, occurs in the
roots of some grasses such as bermudagrass, and in the
leaves, stems and stalks of plants such as corn or sorghum.
When plants are stressed (for example, by drought) this
process slows or stops, allowing nitrates to accumulate."

Seeing as how the TFA got the GMO claim wrong, I see plenty of reason to be skeptical here ... and the vet in TFA suggested multiple factors may be at work.

The Merck vet manual points out cattle are particularly susceptible to nitrite poisoning:
"Many species are susceptible to nitrate and nitrite poisoning, but cattle are affected most frequently. ... Drought conditions, particularly if occurring when plants are immature, may leave the vegetation with high nitrate content. ... Affected animals may die suddenly without appearing ill, in terminal anoxic convulsions within 1 hr, or after a clinical course of 12-24 hr or longer."

'Course, if a particular breed of grass is more likely to kill cattle because of nitrates instead of cyanide, it's still a problem.

Still, this may give me an excuse not to mow the lawn, so there's that.
 
2012-06-24 08:37:27 AM

WhyteRaven74: Weaver95: i'm surprised Monsanto permitted that article to be printed...

Monsanto doesn't have anything to do with the grass in question.

aearra: And the rest of the world was derided for being suspicious of frankenfood.

The grass in question is no different from many other varieties of grass where two varieties are crossed by natural means. It's just a straight up hybrid of two existing grass varieties.


WhyteRaven74: Coelacanth: (and after they get a load of this, that'll go down to zero)

A little googling found something interesting, the grass in question is part Bermuda grass and Bermuda grass is high in hydrocyanic acid. Given the recent drought in Texas it may have had a higher than normal amount of the acid, and when the grass got in the cows' stomachs say good night Gracie.


WhyteRaven74: Coelacanth: The big problem here is that GMOs hybridize like crazy according to my sources.

The grass in question is sterile, and isn't a GMO it's just a regular hybrid.


Monsantapolgist!


/not really
//the word popped into my head, and I figured I should use it before the beer took over
 
2012-06-24 08:45:55 AM

Mr.Tangent: FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW: F W:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:


Oh god so much this. I can't wait until this is all Obama's fault because the jack-booted thugs at the FDA forced Monsanto to use a bunch of experimental chemicals from George Soros' plants.
 
2012-06-24 08:53:49 AM
WHY DO THOSE COWS HATE SCIENCE!!!
www.joeydevilla.com

If they don't like it, they can damn well move and get the fark out of the way of scientific progress!
 
2012-06-24 09:11:46 AM

Weaver95: i'm surprised Monsanto permitted that article to be printed...


Qft.
 
2012-06-24 09:27:43 AM
This will be touted by the anti GM crowd until the end of time, even after it's determined to NOT be the cause.
 
2012-06-24 09:31:00 AM

Coelacanth: WhyteRaven74: Coelacanth: (and after they get a load of this, that'll go down to zero)

A little googling found something interesting, the grass in question is part Bermuda grass and Bermuda grass is high in hydrocyanic acid. Given the recent drought in Texas it may have had a higher than normal amount of the acid, and when the grass got in the cows' stomachs say good night Gracie.

One of my brothers and his family lives in Texas. I just left him a message not to let the kids play in the grass until a few more voices pipe in on this I hope he doesn't freak.

The big problem here is that GMOs hybridize like crazy according to my sources. In Mexico, Monsanto had some fields of some variety of Biocorn. The Mexican army had to go with flamethrowers to get rid of the stuff because the pollen was endangering Monarch butterflies and that heirloom corn crops were becoming Biocorn crops.

I'm still looking for a mention of the flamethrowers online. About five or six years ago, the story was all over the place, but now *shrugs*.

One concern of mine is that GMO corporations like to use the same patented genes over and over again. Today it's grass. Tomorrow will it be tomatoes or strawberries? And the whole country is in a drought condition. What's next? Farm workers keeling over in the fields?


Did they ever solve the mystery of "lateral gene transference"? Jeez, it's been about ten years, but I remember that was one of the biggest concerns about GM crops. (IYDK, lateral gene transfer is the phenomenon by which plants in the same vicinity "pick up" genes from neighboring plants, including resistance genes.
 
2012-06-24 09:52:53 AM
Since some people are apparently slow on the uptake:

This was conventional hybrid grass. It's not a GMO.

This was conventional hybrid grass. It's not a GMO.

This was conventional hybrid grass. It's not a GMO.


born_yesterday: Did they ever solve the mystery of "lateral gene transference"? Jeez, it's been about ten years, but I remember that was one of the biggest concerns about GM crops. (IYDK, lateral gene transfer is the phenomenon by which plants in the same vicinity "pick up" genes from neighboring plants, including resistance genes.


That's an excellent and insightful question. Let me break it down a little further.

Lateral (horizontal) gene transfer is common among lower organisms (bacteria and such), rare among higher organisms (multicellular plants and animals).

Anti-GMO folks believe that GM is fundamentally unnatural and dangerous because it involves this lateral transfer, which otherwise wouldn't happen.

They then try to claim that GMOs will spread their evil artificial genes wantonly throughout the biosphere, because this lateral transfer naturally happens all the time.

See the problem here?

What does happen is conventional crossing between GMOs and related species. So, for example, GM corn can cross with unmodified corn nearby. Both the GM industry and anti-GM groups are focusing a lot of attention on this problem. But it is not horizontal gene transfer.
 
2012-06-24 09:54:11 AM

Coelacanth: WhyteRaven74: Coelacanth: (and after they get a load of this, that'll go down to zero)

One of my brothers and his family lives in Texas. I just left him a message not to let the kids play in the grass until a few more voices pipe in on this I hope he doesn't freak.


Sigh. Its assholes like you who propagated the "VACCINES CAUSE AUTISM!!11" bullshiat through their hysterical knee-jerk reactions.

Kids aren't going to start keeling over because of this. Not only is this type of grass not the same as the one found on playgrounds and other places frequented by kids, the reaction is clearly caused in the cattle's stomachs.
 
Ask
2012-06-24 09:57:33 AM
GMO is the new nuclear. People throw away all critical thinking when it's mentioned.
 
2012-06-24 10:16:26 AM
mr. obama has his head too far up his butt to be able to smell repooblican bs
 
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