If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Blisstree)   How will you spend the millions you'll save by clicking on this exclusive link? Hurry, it's yours free, but it will only be available on the business tab for a few short days   (openforum.com) divider line 20
    More: Obvious, emotional pain  
•       •       •

2420 clicks; posted to Business » on 22 Jun 2012 at 2:36 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



20 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-06-22 02:12:06 PM

And to add to it, I'll re-post something I posted not too long ago. I wrote it in regards to a political promise, but the basic concept is applicable to all types of marketing.

ManateeGag: [Romney] has no idea about how much of the budget "discretionary spending" is. he just knows it sounds bad.

Actually, I'm sure he knows how much it is. He's counting on John Q. Average Voter to hear "slashing discretionary non-defense spending by 5%" and parse it as "SLASHING discretionary non-defense SPENDING BY 5%."

It's a standard marketing/messaging tactic. People hear and parse keywords, and generally ignore everything else. Think back to the run-up to the Iraq War. The administration was careful, but deliberate, in its wording -- pairing "Iraq" with all manner of phrases invoking the 9/11 attacks, but not actually saying the two were connected. Pretty soon, a large percentage of the population actually believed Iraq caused the 9/11 attacks. The messages were specifically crafted to be technically true, but incredibly misleading.

Any time someone is selling something -- a car, a product on TV, themselves for political office, anything -- think like a lawyer. Every word the seller is saying has a specific meaning. Parse each phrase down to its most basic, technical truth. Then, compare that technical truth with what the person is trying to get you to believe is true. The gap between the technical truth and the fairy-tale you're being sold is the precise amount of bullshiat you're being fed at that moment.


In the case of more deceptive tactics, some of the promises are, naturally, outright lies. Good rule of thumb: If someone is guaranteeing outcomes beyond "Spend $X and you will receive Product Y," the promise is bunk. This counts triple if the sales rep is pushy. It's the difference between "you could get [something amazing]" and "you will get [something amazing]."
 
2012-06-22 02:24:51 PM
I hate that this shiat works on people.
 
2012-06-22 03:14:26 PM

jaylectricity: I hate that this shiat works on people.


They're all valid sales tactics, they all represent something in the legitimate world of sales, holiday weekend car/mattress sales, Act now, supplies are selling fast!, etc... The problem is when the product is a P.O.S., or isn't worth the amount you spent, let alone the "comparison" prices. It the main reason that I don't buy 'As seen on TV' stuff. I wait until it shows up on store shelves, and some reviews have started floating around, some of those particular products are halfway decent.

Don't think I'd trust something like this for real estate certification, or something like that, though. Quality investments should be a little more low key, and a little less 'Grab everyone who walks by'...
 
2012-06-22 05:15:32 PM

Mikey1969: jaylectricity: I hate that this shiat works on people.

They're all valid sales tactics, they all represent something in the legitimate world of sales, holiday weekend car/mattress sales, Act now, supplies are selling fast!, etc... The problem is when the product is a P.O.S., or isn't worth the amount you spent, let alone the "comparison" prices. It the main reason that I don't buy 'As seen on TV' stuff. I wait until it shows up on store shelves, and some reviews have started floating around, some of those particular products are halfway decent.

Don't think I'd trust something like this for real estate certification, or something like that, though. Quality investments should be a little more low key, and a little less 'Grab everyone who walks by'...


Well, I get what you're saying. But what bothers me is that we have developed a way to "sell" people. I don't want to come off as some Bill Hicks "marketing department should shoot themselves." I mean, I'm in business for myself and I was starting to wonder if I could apply these things to my sales techniques.

For instance:

1. Exclusivity You can be the only one on your block whose landscape lighting turns on every evening at sundown and turn off after most people go to bed. Your house can be the one that lights up the morning of somebody who has to wake up before the sun comes up to go to work.

I can make that happen.

2. Comparison Your neighbors turn on their lights whenever they remember, or they have timers that need to be reset every few weeks as the days get longer and short over the course of a year.

I don't want to convince people to "Keep up with the Joneses."

3. Urgency I can offer this price for the next two weeks before I'll get bogged down with summer construction projects!

And who knows if I'll ever have enough time to do this sort of thing again.

4. Specificity. Most people that can afford this type of service think nothing of the ten thousand dollars it will cost to be the coolest house on the block. But I can do this for your home (calling the building a home instead of a house or property) for $2855!

I could probably do it for $1500.

------------

Et cetera. I wish I could sit here and type out examples for the rest, but I need to get back to arranging our mini-birthday party for my girlfriend.
 
2012-06-22 05:27:04 PM

jaylectricity: Mikey1969: jaylectricity: I hate that this shiat works on people.

They're all valid sales tactics, they all represent something in the legitimate world of sales, holiday weekend car/mattress sales, Act now, supplies are selling fast!, etc... The problem is when the product is a P.O.S., or isn't worth the amount you spent, let alone the "comparison" prices. It the main reason that I don't buy 'As seen on TV' stuff. I wait until it shows up on store shelves, and some reviews have started floating around, some of those particular products are halfway decent.

Don't think I'd trust something like this for real estate certification, or something like that, though. Quality investments should be a little more low key, and a little less 'Grab everyone who walks by'...

Well, I get what you're saying. But what bothers me is that we have developed a way to "sell" people. I don't want to come off as some Bill Hicks "marketing department should shoot themselves." I mean, I'm in business for myself and I was starting to wonder if I could apply these things to my sales techniques.

For instance:

1. Exclusivity You can be the only one on your block whose landscape lighting turns on every evening at sundown and turn off after most people go to bed. Your house can be the one that lights up the morning of somebody who has to wake up before the sun comes up to go to work.

I can make that happen.

2. Comparison Your neighbors turn on their lights whenever they remember, or they have timers that need to be reset every few weeks as the days get longer and short over the course of a year.

I don't want to convince people to "Keep up with the Joneses."

3. Urgency I can offer this price for the next two weeks before I'll get bogged down with summer construction projects!

And who knows if I'll ever have enough time to do this sort of thing again.

4. Specificity. Most people that can afford this type of service think nothing of the ten thousand dollars it will cost to be the coolest house on the block. But I can do this for your home (calling the building a home instead of a house or property) for $2855!

I could probably do it for $1500.

------------

Et cetera. I wish I could sit here and type out examples for the rest, but I need to get back to arranging our mini-birthday party for my girlfriend.


That's a great example of how these are legitimate tools, and it's a perfectly acceptable use of the same. It's not the tools that are "slimy", as the link claims, it's how they are employed.
 
2012-06-22 05:32:25 PM

Mikey1969: That's a great example of how these are legitimate tools, and it's a perfectly acceptable use of the same. It's not the tools that are "slimy", as the link claims, it's how they are employed.


Right, and my examples are slimey because I probably don't have anything else going on in two weeks, and I could do the work for nearly half of what I quoted.

/Ok, I'm out for real this time. I'll maybe see this thread one more time before I leave my house for a week.
 
das
2012-06-22 05:52:43 PM
P.T. Barnum was right.
 
2012-06-22 06:00:31 PM

jaylectricity: Right, and my examples are slimey because I probably don't have anything else going on in two weeks, and I could do the work for nearly half of what I quoted.

/Ok, I'm out for real this time. I'll maybe see this thread one more time before I leave my house for a week.


If you are providing a comparable value to what you charge and are standing behind everything you state, then it's not "slimy", and your prices are fair. Besides, 100% markup is pretty average, people have to make money somehow. Restaurants have like a 26% food cost and 22% liquor cost if they want to be profitable at all.
 
2012-06-22 06:52:48 PM

das: P.T. Barnum was right.


"More persons, on the whole, are humbugged by believing in nothing, than by believing too much."

?
 
2012-06-22 08:20:55 PM
Bookmarked and will probably use eight
 
2012-06-22 09:46:09 PM
All the marketers use the exact same tactics repeatedly. How can people be exposed to this same-old same-old so ridiculously often and still fall for it? Or are there enough newly-employed 20-somethings who were born yesterday to provide a continuous feed of customers?
 
2012-06-22 10:06:07 PM
The one I have noticed a lot recently is "Try this one [adjective] trick to [verb]".

Try this one ancient trick to lose 10 pounds in a week.
Try this one neat trick to save money on your car insurance.
Try this one easy trick the IRS doesn't want you to know.
 
2012-06-22 10:38:25 PM

nytmare: All the marketers use the exact same tactics repeatedly. How can people be exposed to this same-old same-old so ridiculously often and still fall for it? Or are there enough newly-employed 20-somethings who were born yesterday to provide a continuous feed of customers?


Email scams are stupid for a reason ... scammers only want stupid people to respond to them

Thread: http://www.fark.com/comments/7176065
 
2012-06-22 10:51:56 PM
It goes both ways, though. I have a customer who repeatedly pretends she doesn't know what's going on, even though there's an email record of everything.

Once she owed me $275, but she sent me a check for $125. Then she said she thought that she had the right total, even though I made the amount due clear in the email. The email she sent me had the quoted invoice, yet she said, "Oh, I thought it was less."

Then recently I fixed a bath fan in an apartment she rents out. She was out of town. I emailed her later and said, "If you want, you can just pay me the $100 when we do that other work. Give me a call whenever you're back in town." So she replies, "Just got back from a work week out of town and trying to recoup. Thank you for taking care of the fan. I expect to be in Hull this week and will call but in the meantime I would just like to pay you for the fan. So please send me the bill to [redacted] or email me your address because I can't seem to find it and I'll send the $100 now."

OK, great. I email her the address and who to make the check out to. A week goes by (we live within 10-15 miles of each other) and no check. So I send her an email: "I haven't seen the check, was wondering if you had sent it. I'm going away Saturday afternoon, I'll be back next Friday, although I don't know if I'll be doing any work until the following week."

So she writes back: "I am back in town. Had my grandchildren all week which did not allow me any time for work. since you had offered to add it into to next job I assumed (which I should never do) that you were not in a hurry for it. I mailed the check today. Thank you for taking care of the job and your patience. This week being a scorcher, I did have the children at the beach so didn't call about work. I am hoping to be in [the town where the house is] next Tues/Wed. I am not sure if this is an electricians task or heating professional but I would like to get an estimate from you to work on the thermostats. They don't seem to work properly. And to separate existing electric installed to two walls that are charged to the wrong unit that I would like to fix. In addition, I would like to add a few outlets to the living room. If you happen to be in the area next week on those days, give me a call to come by to talk about it."

#1 She insisted on paying me right away for the work I did, but then later assumed I didn't care when I got it.

#2 I specifically said I was going to be away next week and she asks if I can come look at a job next week.
 
2012-06-22 11:59:52 PM
Easier than shootin' fish in a barrel.
 
2012-06-23 12:04:16 AM
I've been listening to some old Joe Rogan podcasts. I find it amusing how many times stories get rehashed.
 
2012-06-23 01:39:05 AM
My personal favorite is value attribution.

I'll use Invicta watches as an example. They come with a tag that says MSRP $500, but you wind up being able to get them for $129.99 all week long, and then they show up for $79.99 as a deal somewhere. But it's a $500 watch, right?

I recently bought a Stuhrling automatic a few weeks ago for $69.99. MSRP around $400. I think I got a good value because I'd been wanting a completely mechanical watch for a while, and $70 sounded like a good price. And for $70 I got a watch that has a lot more going for it than a quartz driven Invicta. .

Oh, and the discount furniture store "The Dump" is really hardcore about using this flaw. How often do people go shopping for furniture? The average person doesn't know what a good price on furniture is, so they slap a "Previously sold for $4500, now $1500" on something that didn't sell for $1500 originally. They made the mistake of putting "Was $300, now $100" on a lamp that had a model number I could look up and see the MSRP was $99.99.
 
2012-06-23 01:55:08 AM
Bookmarked, printed, read.
And the bottom link to the pumpkin story.


/about a month away from opening my own business
//with a decade in the planning
 
2012-06-23 03:47:54 AM
I took a psych class on persuasion in college, and a lot of these fall under Cialdini's principles of persuasion, if anyone wants to read up on /why/ they work. It was a really interesting class overall, and clearly showed (with journal articles!) how easy it is to get someone to do/think what you want, as long as you know a little about them.
 
2012-06-23 04:01:06 AM
wildcardjack : My personal favorite is value attribution.

I'm too logical for any of this stuff, my mind works more like a computer. I buy things based on a semi fixed set of rules.

A) Everything has an intrinsic value (the cost of the materials, the labor to make it, the cost to ship it).

B) Throw in a little bit for profit.

C) Throw in a little bit for style/support/quality.

If B + C is to much higher than A, I don't buy it.

// I recently bought a Sturhling watch for ~$230 (MSRP ~$750). When I did my comparison shopping, it was essentially the same price everywhere. Normally I spend less on watches, but this one got some bonus money due to style. (I bought it primarily because it reminded me of pocket watches).

ec2.images-amazon.com
 
Displayed 20 of 20 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report