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(Talking Points Memo)   Leaving the solar system is Voyager I's crowning achievement, according to its creator. Starfleet Command has no comment at this time   (idealab.talkingpointsmemo.com) divider line 27
    More: Spiffy, Voyager I, Voyager, interstellar space, heliosphere, critical system, star systems, human languages, Ed Stone  
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1202 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 Jun 2012 at 12:04 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-06-22 09:33:55 AM  
Don't worry, Voyager will be back...in a few hundred years.
 
2012-06-22 10:01:32 AM  
images1.wikia.nocookie.net

Approves.
 
2012-06-22 12:15:48 PM  

Grand_Moff_Joseph: Don't worry, Voyager will be back...in a few hundred years.


And it will be angry.
 
2012-06-22 12:19:10 PM  
4.bp.blogspot.com

Kirk Unit, I'm a computer. Stop all the downloading.
 
2012-06-22 12:19:30 PM  
V'ger was actually Voyager VI, and we never got past II.
 
2012-06-22 12:27:17 PM  

Publikwerks: [4.bp.blogspot.com image 320x278]

Kirk Unit, I'm a computer. Stop all the downloading.


I'd stick my carbon nanotube in her USB 10 port, if you know what I mean, and I think you do.
 
2012-06-22 12:30:55 PM  

AcneVulgaris: Publikwerks: [4.bp.blogspot.com image 320x278]

Kirk Unit, I'm a computer. Stop all the downloading.

I'd stick my carbon nanotube in her USB 10 port, if you know what I mean, and I think you do.


So, you're a necrophiliac?
 
2012-06-22 12:33:55 PM  

AcneVulgaris: I'd stick my carbon nanotube in her USB 10 port, if you know what I mean, and I think you do.


You mean that your manhood is so small it can't be resolved without an electron microscope? Because that's what I'm hearing.
 
2012-06-22 12:35:56 PM  
Scoreboard of Human Evolution-

Post on landmark moment in human history = 7 comments

Post on Britney Spears showing her coont = 1000+ posts
 
2012-06-22 12:38:44 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: [images1.wikia.nocookie.net image 180x154]

Approves.


Not often that Dr. Roykirk gets Fark air time.
 
2012-06-22 12:57:08 PM  
Goddamn, Voyager is awesome. I just finished reading Cosmos and the way Sagan was talking about it 30 years ago in no way blunts how farking awesome the achievement is.

It's also sad how the DoD spends more in a year than has been spent on the entirety of NASA's budget since its inception.

// BWAAAAAAMMMMMM
 
2012-06-22 12:59:02 PM  

spudvol: Scoreboard of Human Evolution-

Post on landmark moment in human history = 7 comments

Post on Britney Spears showing her coont = 1000+ posts


welcome to erf
 
2012-06-22 01:22:09 PM  

AcneVulgaris: Publikwerks: [4.bp.blogspot.com image 320x278]

Kirk Unit, I'm a computer. Stop all the downloading.

I'd stick my carbon nanotube in her USB 10 port, if you know what I mean, and I think you do.


She's dead, Jim.
 
2012-06-22 01:26:14 PM  

AcneVulgaris: Publikwerks: [4.bp.blogspot.com image 320x278]

Kirk Unit, I'm a computer. Stop all the downloading.

I'd stick my carbon nanotube in her USB 10 port, if you know what I mean, and I think you do.


But then what if you were about to get with her and you flashed on Mister Clean...woof...

/+1 if you get the reference
 
2012-06-22 01:27:56 PM  
One can only hope maybe someday we can go find it (wherever it ends up) in person.
 
2012-06-22 01:30:45 PM  

UNC_Samurai: V'ger was actually Voyager VI, and we never got past II.


Even when the movie was written it would have possible to know there would never be a Voyager 6. They may have been thinking of the Mariner program going for 10 missions but the fact that Voyager 1 and 2 evolved from the cancelled Mariner 11 and 12 should have been a clue that the fourth mission after Voyager 2 would be called something besides Voyager 6. It could be that NASA, assisting with the film, requested a number high enough to be never used in reality.
 
2012-06-22 01:48:55 PM  
spudvol: Scoreboard of Human Evolution-

Post on landmark moment in human history = 7 comments

Post on Britney Spears showing her coont = 1000+ posts


Maybe we will find some intellegent life out there somewhere, because we sure haven't found it HERE
 
2012-06-22 02:26:16 PM  

Contribution Corsair: One can only hope maybe someday we can go find it (wherever it ends up) in person.


Indeed. For some nerdy perspective, if we ever invented FTL travel, we could catch up to it very quickly. Consider:

It's taken Voyager dozens of years to make it a far as it has. If the Star Trek warp factor charts were real, a ship traveling at full impulse (~.9 light speed), could cross the solar system in only 44 hours.

So, if we ever do travel that fast, I think we'll find it in short order. :)
 
2012-06-22 04:03:02 PM  

Grand_Moff_Joseph: Contribution Corsair: SNIP



One can hope...if we don't manage to destroy ourselves as a species or go through ANOTHER dark age of religion > science thinking. (which it is a shame how close we're getting to such in some places of the world again...)
 
2012-06-22 05:16:40 PM  

Grand_Moff_Joseph: So, if we ever do travel that fast, I think we'll find it in short order. :)


If it's still working. If not, then we're kinda farked, unless we have Star Trek sensors to go with our Star Trek 0.9c impulse drive. If Voyager 1 stops broadcasting radio signals, then it becomes a small cold dark lump of very mildly radioactive metal. In terms of its distance and vector from the Earth, we can calculate its location to the micrometer and micro-radian just from extrapolation of its last known position. But the difference between that and being able to shine a flashlight on it so that your robotic arm can grab it is huge.

Also, from what I understand, its course and speed will be nontrivially altered by the change in space-weather as it goes through the front edge of the heliopause. So if we don't have the Enterprise standing by to go get it the minute we lose radio contact, I don't love our chances.

/On the plus side, it'll make some alien a trillionaire on the alien equivalent of eBay.
 
2012-06-22 05:24:33 PM  
Nem Wan
2012-06-22 01:30:45 PM

UNC_Samurai: V'ger was actually Voyager VI, and we never got past II.

Even when the movie was written it would have possible to know there would never be a Voyager 6. They may have been thinking of the Mariner program going for 10 missions but the fact that Voyager 1 and 2 evolved from the cancelled Mariner 11 and 12 should have been a clue that the fourth mission after Voyager 2 would be called something besides Voyager 6. It could be that NASA, assisting with the film, requested a number high enough to be never used in reality.


Sorry trek kids, but TMP wasn't written. It went into production half-assed and finished the same
G.R. was a great ideas guy but like G.L (George lucas) a crappy writer.
 
2012-06-22 05:40:17 PM  

semiotix: Grand_Moff_Joseph: So, if we ever do travel that fast, I think we'll find it in short order. :)

If it's still working. If not, then we're kinda farked, unless we have Star Trek sensors to go with our Star Trek 0.9c impulse drive. If Voyager 1 stops broadcasting radio signals, then it becomes a small cold dark lump of very mildly radioactive metal. In terms of its distance and vector from the Earth, we can calculate its location to the micrometer and micro-radian just from extrapolation of its last known position. But the difference between that and being able to shine a flashlight on it so that your robotic arm can grab it is huge.

Also, from what I understand, its course and speed will be nontrivially altered by the change in space-weather as it goes through the front edge of the heliopause. So if we don't have the Enterprise standing by to go get it the minute we lose radio contact, I don't love our chances.

/On the plus side, it'll make some alien a trillionaire on the alien equivalent of eBay.




At the same time though by that point in time if we do have Impulse equivalent or whatever, we should also be able to pass through that area, take readings/data on how it impacts craft and make a reasonable hypothesis on HOW and WHERE it went.

Unless of course some sort of celestial body decides to smash into it in the process....which is decent odds in the intervening time period too.
 
2012-06-22 06:03:52 PM  

Contribution Corsair: At the same time though by that point in time if we do have Impulse equivalent or whatever, we should also be able to pass through that area, take readings/data on how it impacts craft and make a reasonable hypothesis on HOW and WHERE it went.


It all comes down to how precise our imaginary sensors are. My imaginary sensors suck, and don't work much better than the naked eye would (if the naked eye could illuminate everything out there in space so that the darkness wasn't an issue). So we never find it, because the area defined by the (admittedly very tiny!) error bars in our projection of where Voyager is, is still WAY WAY FARKING BIGGER than the reliable radius of our sensors. Like, the difference in magnitude between the volume of the Superdome and the volume of a BB.

In fact, after a sufficiently long period of time, the zone where Voyager might be gets bigger faster than the fastest rate at which we can rule places out, and then it's not even a matter of patience, but dumb luck. (That's true regardless of whose imaginary sensors we're using.)

Your imaginary sensors might make the sensor-radius-to-area estimate more like a basketball vs. a living room, in which case it would just be a question of doing the finite and manageable number of trips until you finally found it.

But we're both kind of missing the point, which is that we know where it is NOW and we have the technology RIGHT NOW to send a faster, bigger thing out there to go get it. And by "get it" I mean "grab it with a robot arm and then keep on flying away from earth" because I'm not sure a return trip from that far away, that fast, is within our means. And by "we have the technology RIGHT NOW" I mean we'd have to buy the plutonium from Russia because we stopped making the right kind of isotopes. But still, why wait for those smug pricks at Starfleet to handle it?
 
2012-06-22 06:38:53 PM  
The live page brings some perspective to them.
 
2012-06-22 07:43:44 PM  

semiotix: Contribution Corsair: Snip



I'd rather we also just work on inner system development more then getting it myself. We got the tech and all to likely get to work on moon and probably Mars but hell, we're still screwing around with relatively small probes. Why can't we land a robotic builder or something on one of those and get to some REAL freakin work.

Or some heavier duty probes with higher resolution cameras, better data gathering instruments and the whole nine yards. I'd love to see a close up of say Io or something in full freaking like full 3d panoramic amazing awesome lifelike quality that I can almost TASTE the matter.
 
2012-06-22 08:18:18 PM  
I feel like this thing's been leaving the Solar System for about 10 years now.
 
2012-06-22 11:34:01 PM  

LDM90: I feel like this thing's been leaving the Solar System for about 10 years now.


To begin to quote a highly regarded bit of science fiction, space is Big. Really, mind-bogglingly Big...
 
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