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(Slate)   Contrary to popular opinion, the out-of-date, 10-year-old clothes you put in the Goodwill bin don't all end up in Alabama   (slate.com) divider line 12
    More: Interesting, good wills, Salvation Army, Alabama, binoculars, doomsday scenarios, hangers  
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4089 clicks; posted to Business » on 21 Jun 2012 at 9:34 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-21 12:30:40 PM  
2 votes:

ajgeek: dumbobruni: these are clothing items that are given away FOR FREE, then sold in developing nations.

You didn't just reference clothing. If we're giving away cars and selling them to people in countries around the world, we have other problems going on. So again, how do these people afford the stuff?


cars might be donated, ever see those cars4kids ads?

and electronics....when you drop those off at "recycling centers" or when your used appliances are taken away when new ones are delivered, they are not necessarily broken down into pieces. often, they are repackaged and shipped overseas.

same with furniture donations (just not as often)

for the demand side, for cars especially: African consumers do have money. The whole continent is poor overall, but the middle class is growing.

as it is, Africa has a bigger middle class than India. in places like Nigeria and South Africa, more than 20% of the population is middle class (a share that has doubled in 15 years) and the populations of these countries are expected to double by 2040.

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2012-06-21 10:21:36 AM  
2 votes:

ajgeek: dumbobruni: second hand clothing exports have done done a great job of farking up native textile industries in sub-Saharan Africa.

the few companies that survived from the used clothes onslaught were taken out by Chinese competition.

repeat this for many other industries: automotive, electronics, furniture, etc.

The way you say that makes it sound almost like we did too good a job at producing and everyone else suffered. My thoughts then turn to costs. How, if we're the richest country and have to pay the most, did lower-currency countries pay for our stuff? Logically this is disconnected.


what part of second hand do you not understand?

these are clothing items that are given away FOR FREE, then sold in developing nations.
2012-06-21 09:41:55 AM  
2 votes:
second hand clothing exports have done done a great job of farking up native textile industries in sub-Saharan Africa.

the few companies that survived from the used clothes onslaught were taken out by Chinese competition.

repeat this for many other industries: automotive, electronics, furniture, etc.
2012-06-21 11:29:55 PM  
1 votes:
I stopped buying new clothes about 8 years ago because I can't afford upscale design shops and everything else is the SOS with different labels. Now I go on treasure hunts through all the resale shops for high-quality, unique clothes.

It's fun, I can afford anything I want, I have an interesting wardrobe, it's recycling and the bad karma from buying sweat-shop clothes has already rubbed off on the first buyer. Plus, I buy new coats every winter, give the old ones to charity drives and I also get to spend my savings on extra-lovely undergarments.

WTF kind of people are we that we buy so many clothes we can't give them all away?
2012-06-21 04:17:49 PM  
1 votes:
Here in Nova Scotia, there's a huge industry built around selling used clothing. Most of it comes from Boston and the surrounding areas.

It's awesome for buying baby clothes - most of it tends to be almost new, and at a fraction of the retil price.
2012-06-21 03:29:23 PM  
1 votes:
csb: I was sitting in the local UU church one Sunday a few years ago, and realized that the person sitting in front of me was wearing a wool jacket that I'd given to Goodwill at least 15 years earlier.

It had a very distinctive stain on the back. I was riding with a friend of mine when he rolled the car. I happened to be drinking a chocolate milkshake at the time.....
2012-06-21 01:24:41 PM  
1 votes:
I already assumed everything I threw away went to Africa.
2012-06-21 01:06:39 PM  
1 votes:
Vaguely related, but it bothers me how so many stores will "kindly" use the money you donate to those boxes they have out so they can get a tax break.

If you're in a giving mood, donate directly and bypass these pricks who use your donation as if it were their own.
2012-06-21 12:06:37 PM  
1 votes:

dumbobruni: these are clothing items that are given away FOR FREE, then sold in developing nations.


You didn't just reference clothing. If we're giving away cars and selling them to people in countries around the world, we have other problems going on. So again, how do these people afford the stuff?
2012-06-21 11:57:15 AM  
1 votes:

Devolving_Spud: There are collection boxes all over south Florida that say only "DONATION BOX". They are clearly not related to any known charity. I suspect the clothing that gets dropped in them is only making money for the person responsible for the box, and nothing ever actually gets to a charity.


In my area, huge red trash containers saying "CLOTHING DONATION BOX" popped up all over the area in an extremely short period of time. People began dropping off their bags of clothes pretty regularly until the local newspaper did an investigative story half a year later that showed the containers were all owned by a local company that re-sold the more stylish donations. When people wrote in saying someone should prosecute, the editors pointed out that there was no basis for any type of prosecution for selling donated items. The containers are still there but only people new to the area seem to use them with any frequency now.
2012-06-21 11:47:43 AM  
1 votes:
Being a stereotypical male, I tend to wear clothing beyond its useful life and into shredded-rag form. I only retire it if my junk/ass is visible through the holes & rips.
I'm a bad consumer - and Africa suffers because of it.
2012-06-21 11:21:09 AM  
1 votes:
There are collection boxes all over south Florida that say only "DONATION BOX". They are clearly not related to any known charity. I suspect the clothing that gets dropped in them is only making money for the person responsible for the box, and nothing ever actually gets to a charity.
 
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