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(KATU)   School district doesn't allow kids to carry sunscreen without Doctor's note. Mom doesn't put sunscreen on kids before they go on field trip. Kids get sunburned. Cue parent outrage and lawyers. Tag is for everyone involved   (katu.com) divider line 85
    More: Dumbass, sunscreens, school districts  
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4919 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Jun 2012 at 8:49 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-21 05:34:16 AM
Taking your kids to hospital for a sunburn like that? Hysterical much?
 
2012-06-21 05:56:46 AM
A doctors note for sunscreen?


Yes, the ter'rists won. That is truly stupid.
 
2012-06-21 05:57:00 AM
TFA: Tacoma Public Schools policy prohibits teachers from putting sunscreen on students. Students can apply their own, but are required to have a doctor's note authorizing them to use it.

What. The. Fark?
 
2012-06-21 06:01:41 AM

AbbeySomeone: Taking your kids to hospital for a sunburn like that? Hysterical much?


FTA...One of her daughters has a documented type of albinism


In case you didn't already know this, the lack of skin pigmentation makes albinos more susceptible to sunburn and skin cancer.

And speaking from personal experience, I was hospitalized briefly for second-degree sunburn when I was 16 (I fell asleep in the sun). In my youth I had red hair & I've always been very fair-skinned. I would imagine that someone with albinism would burn even worse than I did.
 
2012-06-21 07:45:11 AM
FTA: "It was raining when the girls left for school Tuesday morning, but the sun came out midday and ended up burning Violet and Zoe so severely that their mother took them to Tacoma General Hospital that evening."

Yep... I mean, I guess mom should have been listening to the weather or something. I guess sunscreen should totally last more than a few hours in the rain when it's not needed.

You said the tag is for "everyone involved" subby. It appears you're involved now.
 
2012-06-21 07:59:00 AM

Bathia_Mapes: I had red hair & I've always been very fair-skinned.


How YOU doin'?
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-06-21 08:07:05 AM
District spokesman Dan Voelpel says the doctor's note policy is actually based on a statewide law, and is aimed at preventing kids from sharing sunscreen with someone who might have an allergy.

Next up: 17 children starve at summer camp after state law bans them from eating without a doctor's note authorizing the specific food to be consumed.
 
2012-06-21 08:42:28 AM

elffster: A doctors note for sunscreen?


Yes, the ter'rists won. That is truly stupid.


I guess I might as well explain this again:

That would be part of all inclusive measures designed to prevent lawsuits. While it can have annoying moments, it allows for clear policy and since it is clearly explained and all inclusive, prevents lawsuits and makes school cheaper. In other words, it's to save money.

Can it be stupid? Yes. Is it better overall? Probably.
 
2012-06-21 08:53:45 AM

elffster: A doctors note for sunscreen?


Yes, the ter'rists won. That is truly stupid.


This. Good lord have the times changed. In grade school, I used to get strep throat a lot. I brought my antibiotics and cough medicine in my bookbag, took them during lunch. In high school, someone brought in a practice grenade (real grenade, drilled out and firing mechanism/explosives removed), we were looking at it at lunch. A security guard took it, looked and said "Oh cool, one of those dummy grenades" and gave it back to the kid. And this wasn't THAT long ago, mid 1990s. No doubt you'd be arrested for something like that now.
 
2012-06-21 08:54:09 AM

GAT_00: That would be part of all inclusive measures designed to prevent lawsuits. While it can have annoying moments, it allows for clear policy and since it is clearly explained and all inclusive, prevents lawsuits and makes school cheaper. In other words, it's to save money.

Can it be stupid? Yes. Is it better overall? Probably.


Since that policy has now actually caused a lawsuit, please explain how it's better "overall" to regulate non-medical items, in this case sunscreen specifically.
 
2012-06-21 08:55:15 AM
Suing over sunburn? Seriously? This is why we can't have nice things, America

When I was a kid (this was 20ish years ago), we would go to a local amusement park at the end of the school year. Almost every kid got sunburned on those trips.
 
2012-06-21 08:56:18 AM
The mom seems quite rational and her assessment is spot-on, the school's administrators are hiding behind a B.S. policy.
 
2012-06-21 08:57:56 AM

SkunkWerks: FTA: "It was raining when the girls left for school Tuesday morning, but the sun came out midday and ended up burning Violet and Zoe so severely that their mother took them to Tacoma General Hospital that evening."

Yep... I mean, I guess mom should have been listening to the weather or something. I guess sunscreen should totally last more than a few hours in the rain when it's not needed.

You said the tag is for "everyone involved" subby. It appears you're involved now.


If they're gingers and are, as Bathia_Mapes pointed out, borderline albino, not knowing the rules is pretty dumb. Of course, the doctor would have just rolled his/her eyes when they heard the request and written it anyway, but that's not the point. If there is something clinically wrong with your children, a parent is required by sheer common sense to tell everyone who might ever be responsible for them what it is. It's like going into a restaurant with an allergy and not telling anyone, then being SHOCKED when the allergen shows up.
 
2012-06-21 09:01:02 AM

machoprogrammer: Suing over sunburn? Seriously? This is why we can't have nice things, America

When I was a kid (this was 20ish years ago), we would go to a local amusement park at the end of the school year. Almost every kid got sunburned on those trips.


Did almost every kid have albinism and have to go to the hospital? It sounds like the girls were more than just sunburned. If they had fevers and chills, they probably got sun poisoning.

We can't have nice things because she couldn't send her girls to school with the sunscreen they would need in case the sun came out unless they had a doctor's note. And teacher's cannot apply sunblock? Are we really that afraid of pedo teachers?

Seriously, why didn't the parents or teachers at least get the girls in the shade? In the pictures in TFA, they look even redder than I do when I get a bad sunburn, which is pretty farking bad. I'm super pale and will fry if not careful.
 
2012-06-21 09:01:54 AM
If we would just homeschool all of our children like God intended none of this would happen. Right?
 
2012-06-21 09:02:13 AM

AbbeySomeone: Taking your kids to hospital for a sunburn like that? Hysterical much?


Apparently you're not familiar with sun poisoning.

/it's not fun
//it sucks big time
///being Irish is not all drunkeness and laughs
 
2012-06-21 09:02:19 AM

FriarReb98: SkunkWerks: FTA: "It was raining when the girls left for school Tuesday morning, but the sun came out midday and ended up burning Violet and Zoe so severely that their mother took them to Tacoma General Hospital that evening."

Yep... I mean, I guess mom should have been listening to the weather or something. I guess sunscreen should totally last more than a few hours in the rain when it's not needed.

You said the tag is for "everyone involved" subby. It appears you're involved now.

If they're gingers and are, as Bathia_Mapes pointed out, borderline albino, not knowing the rules is pretty dumb. Of course, the doctor would have just rolled his/her eyes when they heard the request and written it anyway, but that's not the point. If there is something clinically wrong with your children, a parent is required by sheer common sense to tell everyone who might ever be responsible for them what it is. It's like going into a restaurant with an allergy and not telling anyone, then being SHOCKED when the allergen shows up.


In TFA, it says that the school was aware of the girls condition.
 
2012-06-21 09:04:33 AM
Because of overly outraged and lawsuity parents schools have to go to absurd CYA measures which causes overly outraged and lawsuity parents so schools have to go to absurd CYA measures which causes overly outraged and lawsuity parents so schools have to go to absurd
 
2012-06-21 09:05:59 AM

ToxicMunkee: If we would just homeschool all of our children like God intended none of this would happen. Right?


Don't bring God into this. He expects kids who are allergic to peanuts or additives in suntan lotion to die off quickly, not to be protected by the state until they reach the age where they can reproduce.
 
2012-06-21 09:09:09 AM
gregory311 Smartest
Funniest
2012-06-21 09:02:13 AM


AbbeySomeone: Taking your kids to hospital for a sunburn like that? Hysterical much?

Apparently you're not familiar with sun poisoning.

/it's not fun
//it sucks big time
///being Irish is not all drunkeness and laughs




Man up you farkin pansy
 
2012-06-21 09:09:25 AM
I just read TFA. Whar lawyer, subby? Whar?
 
2012-06-21 09:10:30 AM
That high-pitched sqealing noise you hear is Franz Kafka spinning in his grave.

Can you spell "doomed", America? You get a prize whatever the outcome, you nation of precious, litigious snowflakes.
 
2012-06-21 09:11:40 AM

GAT_00: elffster: A doctors note for sunscreen?


Yes, the ter'rists won. That is truly stupid.

I guess I might as well explain this again:

That would be part of all inclusive measures designed to prevent lawsuits. While it can have annoying moments, it allows for clear policy and since it is clearly explained and all inclusive, prevents lawsuits and makes school cheaper. In other words, it's to save money.

Can it be stupid? Yes. Is it better overall? Probably.


How about instead of that, you must provide your own sunscreen. So no sharing sunscreen to prevent allergy related risks. You bring your OWN sunscreen and you put it on when you need to. Leave a little bit of common sense in there for the teachers who will know if the kids are lying about bringing their own sunscreen.

After all, even with a Doctor's note, what's to keep you from putting an allergy reaction causing sunscreen on?
 
2012-06-21 09:11:55 AM

nekom: No doubt you'd be arrested for something like that now.


Better than arrested! "Detained".

/wants to bring a snorkel to the waterboarding.
 
2012-06-21 09:11:59 AM

Bathia_Mapes: AbbeySomeone: Taking your kids to hospital for a sunburn like that? Hysterical much?

FTA...One of her daughters has a documented type of albinism


In case you didn't already know this, the lack of skin pigmentation makes albinos more susceptible to sunburn and skin cancer.

And speaking from personal experience, I was hospitalized briefly for second-degree sunburn when I was 16 (I fell asleep in the sun). In my youth I had red hair & I've always been very fair-skinned. I would imagine that someone with albinism would burn even worse than I did.


red hair..fair skin and a user name that MIGHT be female?? you know I am clicking that profile!!!

/and leaving disappointed :(
 
2012-06-21 09:19:23 AM
In unrelated news, the Tacoma Public Schools combats cancer detractors by handing out free cancer sticks. A doctor's note is mandatory to opt out of participation.

i256.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-21 09:23:06 AM
I could see the rule for pre-school. But for kids older than 5, they are pretty good about understanding allergies and keeping away from what makes them allergic. I was allergic to milk and eggs, and the rest of the kids in the school didn't need a doctor's note to eat an omelet.
 
2012-06-21 09:24:52 AM

Dancin_In_Anson: TFA: Tacoma Public Schools policy prohibits teachers from putting sunscreen on students. Students can apply their own, but are required to have a doctor's note authorizing them to use it.


All of this kind of shiat happens because of parents like the parents in TFA.
 
2012-06-21 09:34:17 AM

doubled99: gregory311 Smartest
Funniest
2012-06-21 09:02:13 AM


AbbeySomeone: Taking your kids to hospital for a sunburn like that? Hysterical much?

Apparently you're not familiar with sun poisoning.

/it's not fun
//it sucks big time
///being Irish is not all drunkeness and laughs



Man up you farkin pansy


What exactly does that mean, Mr. Internet Tough-Dude?
 
2012-06-21 09:35:42 AM
For Pete's sake. The mom is the dumbass here. I don't care if it's a monsoon outside, if your kid is going on an outdoor field trip and he/she suffers from albinism, then it should be an automatic that you send sunscreen with them...WITH a doctor's note. No thought needed. In fact, you should treat it like any other disease where you have to take daily pills, or asthma, or peanut allergies. In those cases, the teacher is/should be alowed to hold an epi-pen or emergency inhaler for you. This case is no different and apparantly no less life threatening. The child's teacher should be made aware of it and given permission to administer the sunscreen. Big ol' dumbass tag for the mom.

Yeah, it's silly that kids can't apply their own sunscreen, but this district has probably had issues regarding allergic reactions before and is just covering their ass in case something happens again. I can't blame them.
 
2012-06-21 09:39:18 AM
I remember the days where I was told by my teacher to put sunscreen on to make sure my ginger self was not burned on field trips.
 
2012-06-21 09:40:12 AM

Wellon Dowd: ToxicMunkee: If we would just homeschool all of our children like God intended none of this would happen. Right?

Don't bring God into this. He expects kids who are allergic to peanuts or additives in suntan lotion to die off quickly, not to be protected by the state until they reach the age where they can reproduce.


Mysterious ways.

/but he loves you
 
2012-06-21 09:42:11 AM

nekom: elffster: A doctors note for sunscreen?


Yes, the ter'rists won. That is truly stupid.

This. Good lord have the times changed. In grade school, I used to get strep throat a lot. I brought my antibiotics and cough medicine in my bookbag, took them during lunch. In high school, someone brought in a practice grenade (real grenade, drilled out and firing mechanism/explosives removed), we were looking at it at lunch. A security guard took it, looked and said "Oh cool, one of those dummy grenades" and gave it back to the kid. And this wasn't THAT long ago, mid 1990s. No doubt you'd be arrested for something like that now.


Haha. Times have changed. There was a SECURITY GUARD at your High School!
 
2012-06-21 09:42:39 AM
It really seems like we're training people to avoid critical thinking at all costs.

What is the total economic cost of this policy? Across the school district thousands ( tens of thousands?) of kids need to make a visit to the doctor to be able to take sunscreen to school - presumeably every year. That must cost hundreds of thousands of dollars every year. Then there are costs associated with administering and policing the policy.

And for what? To avoid one kid in the school district getting a rash if they pinch somebody else's sunscreen?

I know it sounds tinfoil hatty, but the fact this pointless stuff happens all over te country and is so pervasive despite being so useless - it really looks like an effort to raise an unquestioning generation of children who are terrified of even the slightest hint of danger.
 
2012-06-21 09:43:28 AM
I live in Olympia, not far from Tacoma. And I used to live in Tacoma before my kids were born.

There were a lot of reasons for moving away from Tacoma before having kids. The completely useless idiots running the schools were one of them. Tacoma Public Schools are terrible in pretty much every respect, and this kind of dumbassery is just emblematic of that.
 
2012-06-21 09:44:53 AM

GAT_00: elffster: A doctors note for sunscreen?


Yes, the ter'rists won. That is truly stupid.

I guess I might as well explain this again:

That would be part of all inclusive measures designed to prevent lawsuits. While it can have annoying moments, it allows for clear policy and since it is clearly explained and all inclusive, prevents lawsuits and makes school cheaper. In other words, it's to save money.

Can it be stupid? Yes. Is it better overall? Probably.


Um...no.

It's not "better overall."

It's a dodge in which people whose job requires them to exercise sound, independent judgment in changing and individualized conditions dodge exercising that judgment. It's a dodge in which employers whose job requires them to hire people with sound judgment dodge the responsibility for hiring people with sound judgment and monitoring their employees and reviewing their performance to see that they actually do have sound judgment.

Catch-all, zero common sense policies are attempts by the districts involved to avoid doing their jobs. They are attempts to provide legal weasel-word excuses for cover when bad things happen to the people those districts are supposed to serve--the children--when those districts don't do their jobs.

Children got injured because the district didn't do its job.

The district is applying weasel wording to try to dodge.

It shouldn't be allowed to work. This kind of zero common sense policy should be actively discouraged every time it creates real world problems by clashing wildly with the district's responsibility to exercise good judgment in providing education services to the students in its care.

Let's say I pay eighty-five cents for a glass of milk, instead of a dollar. Now let's say half of that "glass of milk" is milk and half of it is water I could have gotten for free. I've gotten a full glass to drink for eighty-five cents. I haven't saved fifteen cents; I've been cheated out of thirty-five cents. If I don't normally overeat, I have to make up those calories and that nutrition with food I pay for somewhere else.

The people selling me milk aren't delivering me "milk that costs less." They're cheating bastards who aren't doing their job. (This actually happened when I was a kid--the dairy got caught watering down the milk and selling it at full price.)

The parents here aren't saving money on education. They're having to spend extra money to deal with needless injuries to their students because the school isn't applying common sense.

Let's ignore the mother in TFA for a minute. Sunscreen has to be reapplied at midday. For every kid with an afternoon gym class, the parents are either out of pocket for a completely unnecessary doctor visit for the note for the sunscreen, or they're out of pocket for after-sunburn products when their kid comes home sunburned because the school is too stupid to pull a burning kid into the shade.

This isn't "saving money on education." This is, like the watered down milk, cheating people out of what they already paid for and transferring the costs of what you're cheating them out of back onto them.

Given that districts like this always but always have more than one zero common sense policy--as avoiding the exercise of good judgment in favor of legal weasel words is an operational strategy, not a one-off--there are usually lots of various hidden costs being transferred back onto the parents by the school's refusal to exercise judgment.
 
2012-06-21 09:46:44 AM
So glad my kid goes to a daycare with a reasonable policy.

At the start of the warm months each parent is given a form to sign. Option 1 is we give permission for our kid to use the school provided sunscreen. Option 2 is we want our kid to use sunscreen we provide to the school. We don't sign and our kid doesn't get outside play time. Form is good for the entire spring/summer/fall. If the weather is nice enough for outdoor play, my son gets sunscreen applied to him. (They are too young to not have it applied by the teacher.) That means he wears sunscreen practically every day, not just on field trip days.

I can understand the not having teachers apply it (cross contamination) but that just means Little Kid A will ask Little Kid B to help, which would be even more likely to cause the problem. A teacher aware of a kid having an allergy would likely take care of the allergic kids first, or give her hands a good scrubbing before applying lotion.

When I was in high school and junior high we ate lunch outside every day. Which meant with my Scottish heritage, I slathered on sunscreen before lunch. It was that or burn.

Doctor's note only makes sense if your kid needed a prescription sunscreen, and I'm not even sure those exist.
 
2012-06-21 09:51:40 AM
Dumbass trophies all around.

But as someone who turns into a lobster at the first sight of a sunbeam...I look at those pictures and cringe. Throw me some SPF45 and a parasol, thanks.
 
2012-06-21 09:57:12 AM

AbbeySomeone: Taking your kids to hospital for a sunburn like that? Hysterical much?


Abbey, usually your comments aren't this ignorant. Sun poisoning is real and isn't much fun. You must be brown or black not to know this.
 
2012-06-21 10:04:33 AM
What about those antibiotic hand cleaners that every teacher seems to squirt at any excuse?
Need a permission slip for that?
 
2012-06-21 10:11:24 AM

elffster: A doctors note for sunscreen?


Yes, the ter'rists won. That is truly stupid.


Yeah. That's the real stupid here.

GAT_00: elffster: A doctors note for sunscreen?


Yes, the ter'rists won. That is truly stupid.

I guess I might as well explain this again:

That would be part of all inclusive measures designed to prevent lawsuits. While it can have annoying moments, it allows for clear policy and since it is clearly explained and all inclusive, prevents lawsuits and makes school cheaper. In other words, it's to save money.

Can it be stupid? Yes. Is it better overall? Probably.


It's stupid, period. It's about lawsuits, not about helping the kids.

machoprogrammer: Suing over sunburn? Seriously? This is why we can't have nice things, America

When I was a kid (this was 20ish years ago), we would go to a local amusement park at the end of the school year. Almost every kid got sunburned on those trips.


I think the parents were right to sue. The school sat by and let the problem grow worse because they didn't want to get involved.

LaraAmber: So glad my kid goes to a daycare with a reasonable policy.

At the start of the warm months each parent is given a form to sign. Option 1 is we give permission for our kid to use the school provided sunscreen. Option 2 is we want our kid to use sunscreen we provide to the school. We don't sign and our kid doesn't get outside play time. Form is good for the entire spring/summer/fall. If the weather is nice enough for outdoor play, my son gets sunscreen applied to him. (They are too young to not have it applied by the teacher.) That means he wears sunscreen practically every day, not just on field trip days.


Yup. That's an example of a reasonable way to handle it.
 
2012-06-21 10:12:22 AM

LittleMissStubborn: Dumbass trophies all around.

But as someone who turns into a lobster at the first sight of a sunbeam...I look at those pictures and cringe. Throw me some SPF45 and a parasol, thanks.


You do have a doctor's note for that parasol, right?
 
2012-06-21 10:12:50 AM
GAT_00 I guess I might as well explain this again:

That would be part of all inclusive measures designed to prevent lawsuits.


More support for zero tolerance and zero intelligence.
 
2012-06-21 10:17:08 AM

turboke: LittleMissStubborn: Dumbass trophies all around.

But as someone who turns into a lobster at the first sight of a sunbeam...I look at those pictures and cringe. Throw me some SPF45 and a parasol, thanks.

You do have a doctor's note for that parasol, right?


Aww crap.
 
2012-06-21 10:22:13 AM
If the kid has Albinism they should be able to get a doctor's note, right?
 
2012-06-21 10:23:21 AM

Julie Cochrane: It's a dodge in which people whose job requires them to exercise sound, independent judgment in changing and individualized conditions dodge exercising that judgment. It's a dodge in which employers whose job requires them to hire people with sound judgment dodge the responsibility for hiring people with sound judgment and monitoring their employees and reviewing their performance to see that they actually do have sound judgment.


If a person was capable of sound, independent judgment, they wouldn't a teacher in today's climate. Requires a college degree (sometimes with a dual major), comes with surprise layoffs, asinine bureaucracy, low starting pay, the potential for that pay to not increase for years at a time, the potential for a professionally destructive accusation of pedophilia, helicopter parents, zero-tolerance policies AND having to deal with children? You'd have to be crazy or incompetent to take that deal.
 
2012-06-21 10:24:33 AM

doubled99: gregory311 Smartest
Funniest
2012-06-21 09:02:13 AM


AbbeySomeone: Taking your kids to hospital for a sunburn like that? Hysterical much?

Apparently you're not familiar with sun poisoning.

/it's not fun
//it sucks big time
///being Irish is not all drunkeness and laughs



Man up you farkin pansy


Useful post is usefulless.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-06-21 10:33:27 AM
This actually happened when I was a kid--the dairy got caught watering down the milk and selling it at full price.

Some farmers decided to make a few bucks by diluting milk and adding salt to restore flavor. In due course they got caught. The Court of Appeals had to decide how big the fraud was. The decision was, they had contaminated everything their illegal milk touched in the course of processing. The legal term for improperly prepared or altered food is "adulterated." Adulteration is homeopathic. (Court case link (PDF))
 
2012-06-21 10:34:13 AM

Loren: machoprogrammer: Suing over sunburn? Seriously? This is why we can't have nice things, America

When I was a kid (this was 20ish years ago), we would go to a local amusement park at the end of the school year. Almost every kid got sunburned on those trips.

I think the parents were right to sue. The school sat by and let the problem grow worse because they didn't want to get involved.



I didn't see anything in the article about the parents suing.
 
2012-06-21 10:47:21 AM
Easy fix. Grab their lawyer by the gonads with a pair of pliers and say "do you need a doctors note?" No woman with children would make a policy like that.
 
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