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(Some Joelogon)   The documentary about my dad, an RAF mechanic & Japanese POW during WWII, US Army Korean War vet and, finally US citizen and doctor, is online, free. Watch "Every Day Is a Holiday"   (everydayisaholiday.org) divider line 70
    More: Followup, Japanese POW, RAF, WWII, mechanic, checkout, documentary  
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3161 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Jun 2012 at 1:07 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-20 09:56:45 PM
I'd love to.
 
2012-06-20 10:02:46 PM
Subby, could you please link to the original thread?
/ I think I remember it as fascinating
 
2012-06-20 10:32:00 PM
Awesome thank you. I was pretty sad when I found it was not broadcast in my area.
 
2012-06-20 10:33:00 PM

AlwaysRightBoy: Subby, could you please link to the original thread?
/ I think I remember it as fascinating


I have it saved.
 
2012-06-20 10:37:22 PM
Thank you, subby!
 
2012-06-20 10:43:35 PM
I love your dad. Thanks for sharing.
 
2012-06-20 10:53:20 PM

violentsalvation: AlwaysRightBoy: Subby, could you please link to the original thread?
/ I think I remember it as fascinating

I have it saved.


Thanks.

Subby, thank you. My dad was also a US Army Korean War vet and it took him many years to tell me what he did before he died.

My fishing buddy and mentor, who is a Vietnam Veteran didn't take as long, he opened up after only 30 something years.
 
2012-06-20 10:58:54 PM
If he talked about it more than once he was probably lying.
 
2012-06-20 11:10:44 PM
Hey folks, thanks. The embedded video in the link above should work until July 7th (non-US farkers may not be able to view because of geo-filtering, sorry).

The original thread is here: http://www.fark.com/comments/7129105 (Correction to my original headline -- my father served one year in Korea, and just about two years total in the US Army)

NowhereMon: If he talked about it more than once he was probably lying.


Well, it took about 40 years for my sister to get the story out of him; he started opening up as more vets of his age started dying. (Also, when the UK paid out compensation to WWII POWs around 200).
 
2012-06-20 11:47:44 PM
Oh boo. Bad admin! Reconsider!
 
2012-06-21 12:54:15 AM
Oh yay. Good admin! thank you.

We have to get these stories out and written down before we lose them all, they are getting really old and dying too fast.
 
2012-06-21 01:12:06 AM

NewportBarGuy: I love your dad. Thanks for sharing.


Yes. No doubt. Thank you and your family ever so much.
 
2012-06-21 01:13:49 AM
It was great. Thanks for the link.
 
2012-06-21 01:13:56 AM
Just started watching.

Thanks, subby.
 
2012-06-21 01:23:43 AM
Bookmarked.
Thanks, subby.
 
2012-06-21 01:23:51 AM
Been waiting for this since the first thread was posted; thanks Subby, it's a fantastic story, and I'm glad to have heard it. Your father is a treasure, and his history deserves to be known.
 
2012-06-21 01:25:36 AM
Bookmarked.
 
2012-06-21 01:27:00 AM
Subby,
Just finished reading a biography of a US flier held captive in Japan ("Unbroken"). My God it was brutal. Your dad must have been one strong man.
 
2012-06-21 01:31:11 AM
had two door greeters at walmart. both were vets. one wouldnt say shiat for shiat about anything. the other spoke about it like it was the best thing ever. funny thing tho is that the one who spoke about it went through HELL. (yes, I believe what he said was true. he had his medals and everything) the one who wouldnt ... I cant imagine what he went through if he refused to talk about it.
 
2012-06-21 01:38:13 AM

llevrok: Subby,
Just finished reading a biography of a US flier held captive in Japan ("Unbroken"). My God it was brutal. Your dad must have been one strong man.


That was one of the most phenomenal books I've ever read. My grandfather-in-law is a WWII Pacific Theater vet and will very rarely, if ever, speak about what happened (he got shot twice in Okinawa, IIRC). The one thing he told me that I distinctly remember was that on the boat ride over, they had to sleep under the tracks of the tanks (that had been propped up on wooden beams). I would've peed myself ten times over.
 
2012-06-21 01:47:48 AM
If ever I take this for granted. If ever I fail to be in awe of the sacrifices of others
 
2012-06-21 02:03:35 AM
Pass along my thanks for his sacrifices and his service. We need more like him in this country asthey are the ones that make the country strong.
 
2012-06-21 02:05:10 AM

universebetween: had two door greeters at walmart. both were vets. one wouldnt say shiat for shiat about anything. the other spoke about it like it was the best thing ever. funny thing tho is that the one who spoke about it went through HELL. (yes, I believe what he said was true. he had his medals and everything) the one who wouldnt ... I cant imagine what he went through if he refused to talk about it.


My Grandpa was in WWII and rarely talked about anything. He fought in the Chinese-Burma-india campaign as one of Merrill's Marauders. He had a bunch of medals but would never say what he got them for. We didn't even know any of that until my aunt stumbled onto some pictures of him from his old unit on the internet.

My dad was in Vietnam and talks about it a bit more. Mostly about his bar fights and his band that would play on leave. said he spent more time in the brig than fighting.

My roommate was in the first Gulf war and really doesn't talk about it much either. Just about his scars and talked about the guys getting shipments of booze disguised as Listerine bottles.

They have all said that unless you have been there you just can't understand. So I'm pretty sure why that is one of the reasons they are so reluctant to talk about it.

\thanks again subs...interesting video
 
2012-06-21 02:14:17 AM
Thanks to you and your dad.

Hero tag not big enough.
 
2012-06-21 02:22:44 AM
Having now watched the full documentary:

I hope that your father knows how much of an impact he has had on others, Joelogon. Thank you so much for this; I'm glad to have heard his story, and only wish that I had the opportunity to meet such a remarkable person.
 
2012-06-21 02:23:42 AM
very cool
 
2012-06-21 02:36:51 AM
pbs is streaming it right now. http://video.ket.org/video/2244997834/
 
2012-06-21 02:44:48 AM

Tellingthem: My Grandpa was in WWII and rarely talked about anything.


Subby doesn't share that trait. He tells us about his father constantly.
 
2012-06-21 02:56:17 AM
I certainly will. Thanks, subby.

/This is certainly a bookmark.
 
2012-06-21 03:28:40 AM
What a remarkable life.
 
2012-06-21 03:34:54 AM
just finished the full video. great job - tell your sister that.
makes my own life and troubles seem like weenie problems.
 
2012-06-21 03:42:42 AM
Thank you for sharing.
 
2012-06-21 03:48:51 AM
Thanks Subby. Major props to your dad.

farkityfarker: Tellingthem: My Grandpa was in WWII and rarely talked about anything.

Subby doesn't share that trait. He tells us about his father constantly.


You know how I know you're an ass?
 
2012-06-21 03:57:04 AM
I actually saw this on my local PBS station late one night.

It was such an incredible story. Your Dad is an incredible man. I'm glad that your sister and he saw fit to share his story with the rest of us.
 
2012-06-21 04:41:44 AM
I'm looking forward to watching it.



Thanks, subby.
 
2012-06-21 04:41:57 AM

Joelogon: Hey folks, thanks. The embedded video in the link above should work until July 7th (non-US farkers may not be able to view because of geo-filtering, sorry).

The original thread is here: http://www.fark.com/comments/7129105 (Correction to my original headline -- my father served one year in Korea, and just about two years total in the US Army)

NowhereMon: If he talked about it more than once he was probably lying.

Well, it took about 40 years for my sister to get the story out of him; he started opening up as more vets of his age started dying. (Also, when the UK paid out compensation to WWII POWs around 200).


Thanks for the link Joelogon, and please thank your dad and your sister for me too.

Oh and just FYI, the link does work in Canada. :)
 
2012-06-21 06:05:57 AM
Simply an amazing story. I live for this kind of stuff. Thank you for sharing this story, subby, please tell him that (and I'm sure anyone from Chattanooga or anywhere for that matter will say the same) his lesson on living life as a holiday everyday will be taken with the greatest of format of listening, emulating it to the best that one can.
 
2012-06-21 06:19:29 AM
Thanks
 
2012-06-21 06:42:29 AM
20 min clip? THAT'S IT?! Oh, you've got to click on this other link to get the full hour!


/Gramps (RIP) used to talk very fondly of his time stationed in Kawaii before December 10th (I think he was supposed to be discharged the 12th or something). His pacific theater time... NOT SO MUCH.
//He kinda lost his isht from seeing all his friends die around him, wasn't fit for combat anymore.
 
2012-06-21 06:45:32 AM

mekkab: KawaiiKauai




/zomg, what a terrible, terrible mistake!
 
2012-06-21 06:48:46 AM

mekkab: 20 min clip? THAT'S IT?! Oh, you've got to click on this other link to get the full hour!


/Gramps (RIP) used to talk very fondly of his time stationed in Kawaii before December 10th (I think he was supposed to be discharged the 12th or something). His pacific theater time... NOT SO MUCH.
//He kinda lost his isht from seeing all his friends die around him, wasn't fit for combat anymore.


Cute.

:-/
 
2012-06-21 07:05:11 AM
tl/dw

/j/k
//I love shiat like that, I'll have to try to find some time to watch it.
 
2012-06-21 07:21:05 AM
What an incredible life your father has led. I was moved to tears so often in this story. I was not only moved by his strength, but also was struck by his immovable will, and never failing faith that one day things would be better, and his ability to laugh at every obstacle that the japanese threw at him, and sadly, even with all he had been through, America did as well. I think that you are singularly very lucky to have such a shining soul for a father and a role model.

This was an amazing tale of such a full life, with so many places seen, friends made, lost, and a incredible story of one man's path through a life that most of us can't even imagine.

Please tell your father thank and God bless you, from my family to him and his, for all of our freedoms that we so enjoy, and that sadly most take for granted. Some of us know the price that was paid for it.
 
2012-06-21 07:26:31 AM
My grandfather said "Everyday is a holiday" from the time he retired right up until he died a few months ago.
 
2012-06-21 07:30:16 AM
I was a bit afraid that the link might not be working here in the UK. But i was able to watch the documentary! Very touching.

Great job Theresa.
Great life Paul.


Cheers!
 
2012-06-21 08:05:28 AM
Bookmark.
 
2012-06-21 08:14:37 AM

farkityfarker: Tellingthem: My Grandpa was in WWII and rarely talked about anything.

Subby doesn't share that trait. He tells us about his father constantly.


Look everyone, a douche. Is he such a miserable farktard because he is unable to feel proud of his father? Is he just such a scumbag that, as an adult, gets off on pissing on everyones parade? What motivates such an unhappy person to lash out on random strangers on the internet? Nature versus nurture? Borderline personality disorder? I'll explore this and more in my next PBS documentary.
 
2012-06-21 08:23:42 AM
Korean War vet and a doctor, is this a M*A*S*Hup?
 
2012-06-21 08:47:19 AM

mekkab: 20 min clip? THAT'S IT?! Oh, you've got to click on this other link to get the full hour!


Argh. Sorry, I thought the embedded video was playing the full 56 minutes as of last week.

We're checking to see what's going on with the PBS player -- in the meantime, you can see the full 56 minute video by going directly to the KET site: http://video.ket.org/video/2244997834
 
2012-06-21 09:16:22 AM

dstanley:, AlwaysRightBoy, violentsalvation, eltejon, JustinCase, NewportBarGuy,
Mr. Potatoass, Albino Squid, aevert:


Thanks, folks. Thanks to the admins too for greenlighting. Note to all, as mekkab discovered, the embedded video right now shows the first 20 minutes, then picks up on the KET site... if this will bug you and we can't embed the full version, you can see the full 56 minutes by going directly to the KET site: http://video.ket.org/video/2244997834

(incidentally, my sister was able to partner with KET, Kentucky Educational Television, on production because my dad did his basic training and Armor school at Fort Knox)

llevrok: Subby,
Just finished reading a biography of a US flier held captive in Japan ("Unbroken"). My God it was brutal. Your dad must have been one strong man.

He is. I haven't heard of that biography, I'll check it out and let my dad know too, thanks. (I see the title of the book almost gets second billing to 'Seabiscuit').

Thanks, everyone else for your kind words for my father. Just like I did for the last thread, I'll show this to him; it means a lot to him.
 
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