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(Jalopnik)   NASA has some of the most awesome vending machines ever   (jalopnik.com) divider line 32
    More: Cool, NASA, robotic spacecraft, Mars rovers, Jet Propulsion Laboratory  
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10852 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Jun 2012 at 12:52 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



32 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-06-20 01:04:09 PM
i hate it when my bit gets stuck.
 
2012-06-20 01:06:57 PM

asciibaron: i hate it when my bit gets stuck.


shake the machine, maybe a thread cutter will fall out as well
 
2012-06-20 01:08:17 PM
Damn, I needed this when I used to work in a tool crib

RFID'd hand tools
 
2012-06-20 01:32:58 PM
The hell? CribMaster machines are common in tons of major factories. I walk by at least 50-60 of them every day just to get to the cafeteria. Now, the multi-million dollar custom-designed drill machines that self-select a drill bit from a rack/bin, mounts the bit on a robotic arm, and then uses laser guides to project a coordinate system on a panel and proceed to drill according to a pre-engineered plan? That thing is *AWESOME* to watch. A single plan might include 50-125 drill bits and well over a 500 holes drilled at varying depths. Some of the IEs told me how fast it can drill but I've forgotten the statistics. I wish I could post some pics, but no picture taking is allowed on our facility.
 
2012-06-20 01:43:02 PM
Meh, not impressed.
 
2012-06-20 01:55:24 PM
Where's the one full of used schoolgirl panties?
 
2012-06-20 01:59:48 PM
whatever

Our Toolboss dispenser is better
 
2012-06-20 02:34:39 PM
I almost got a job doing support for the backed systems for similar tool vending machines. The actual jobs was admitedly out of my league and the lesser job I could have actually gotten was too "help desk".

/csb
 
2012-06-20 02:34:46 PM
Weeners on that article was more entertaining than the article itself.
 
2012-06-20 02:53:09 PM
www.delish.com
Anyone ever tried one of these?
 
2012-06-20 04:30:18 PM

PsyLord: [www.delish.com image 400x400]
Anyone ever tried one of these?


Way back in 1998 my call center had one of those. It's just microwave fries in an automated microwave cabinet.

I'd rather we had a pizza vending machine.
 
2012-06-20 04:31:35 PM
I don't get it. Why do these machines exist? is it for security reasons? Why not have this stuff in bins for people to use?
 
2012-06-20 04:37:55 PM

Maul555: I don't get it. Why do these machines exist? is it for security reasons? Why not have this stuff in bins for people to use?


It's inventory control & tracking, and theft prevention. Tooling can run in the hundreds of dollars, and scrap tooling is often stolen or collected and sold.

/when I ran a tool crib I had two 5 gallon buckets of carbide bits and HSS tools, I wish I'd have taken it before I left
 
2012-06-20 04:39:22 PM

Maul555: I don't get it. Why do these machines exist? is it for security reasons? Why not have this stuff in bins for people to use?


It is security. Dispensing the tooling ties to one employees number, and maybe to a specific project for billing purposes. One ten pack of lathe inserts can run anywhere from $120 to $1500 depending on geometry and coatings. It also keeps track of inventory levels automatically and any many cases, will order new inventory so that it doesn't run out. If the company is big enough, the vendor will frequently supply the machines and keep them stocked. The customer doesn't get a bill until the tooling is actually dispensed and used.

These machines haven't completely removed the need for a locking tooling room, with a FTE, who manually checks out tooling to employees and reorders new ones.
 
2012-06-20 04:41:10 PM

PsyLord: [www.delish.com image 400x400]
Anyone ever tried one of these?


I used to sell computer equipment to Ore-Ida Foods (now part of Heinz). They had one in the employee break room, that they had developed, that they were testing. They let me get some from it once. They were pretty good fries.
 
2012-06-20 05:03:51 PM
My company uses them (and had the candy-machine style up until last week). Very useful for dispensing tools but it has some drawbacks. Each 'transaction' takes longer and a tool can't be easily picked to check its geometry. Also those machines are rented, not owned and the rental costs of the service are exorbitant. Personally I prefer a person designated 'crib boss' who records transactions (in addition to his regular job).
 
2012-06-20 05:06:32 PM

bemis23: The hell? CribMaster machines are common in tons of major factories. I walk by at least 50-60 of them every day just to get to the cafeteria. Now, the multi-million dollar custom-designed drill machines that self-select a drill bit from a rack/bin, mounts the bit on a robotic arm, and then uses laser guides to project a coordinate system on a panel and proceed to drill according to a pre-engineered plan? That thing is *AWESOME* to watch. A single plan might include 50-125 drill bits and well over a 500 holes drilled at varying depths. Some of the IEs told me how fast it can drill but I've forgotten the statistics. I wish I could post some pics, but no picture taking is allowed on our facility.


But here's the thing, most of the people reading gizmodo and boing boing don't work in factories; therefore if there some new tech innovation in the blue-collar field, nerds with desk jobs will look on in amazement and say "look at this cool think the Morlocks are using, why didn't they tell us?"
 
2012-06-20 05:07:08 PM

weiserfireman: Maul555: I don't get it. Why do these machines exist? is it for security reasons? Why not have this stuff in bins for people to use?

It is security. Dispensing the tooling ties to one employees number, and maybe to a specific project for billing purposes. One ten pack of lathe inserts can run anywhere from $120 to $1500 depending on geometry and coatings. It also keeps track of inventory levels automatically and any many cases, will order new inventory so that it doesn't run out. If the company is big enough, the vendor will frequently supply the machines and keep them stocked. The customer doesn't get a bill until the tooling is actually dispensed and used.

These machines haven't completely removed the need for a locking tooling room, with a FTE, who manually checks out tooling to employees and reorders new ones.


Actually the 'ten pack of inserts' is one of the failings of the system. Either you have to package the inserts to be dispensed individually (taking longer and requiring a *much* larger volume of system) or simply have a door that unlocks, trusting the employee to remove the number of inserts he/she requisitioned (and requiring a periodic physical recount to make sure that the quantity listed in-system is correct).
 
2012-06-20 05:42:50 PM

Maul555: I don't get it. Why do these machines exist? is it for security reasons? Why not have this stuff in bins for people to use?


I was going to make a parallel to the saying that NASA spent millions of dollars on a pen that would work in space, while the Russians just used a pencil, by saying instead of this the Russians would just use labeled drawers. But i don't think anyone would have gotten it without me explaining.

All that aside, it's probably easier for the company providing the tools to keep track electronically than it is to have some guy count how many are missing each day or week.
 
2012-06-20 06:04:45 PM
wow, that's a lot of informative answers... Thanks
 
2012-06-20 07:08:11 PM
J. Frank Parnell: I was going to make a parallel to the saying that NASA spent millions of dollars on a pen that would work in space, while the Russians just used a pencil

Well, except for the fact that NASA did no such thing (Fisher Pens developed the pen themselves, and gave/sold some to NASA). Here's an interesting site, which shows the writing instruments used on Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo flights (as well as some Shuttle flights). There's also some history on who used what.
 
2012-06-20 08:26:32 PM

Jim DiGriz: J. Frank Parnell: I was going to make a parallel to the saying that NASA spent millions of dollars on a pen that would work in space, while the Russians just used a pencil

Well, except for the fact that NASA did no such thing (Fisher Pens developed the pen themselves, and gave/sold some to NASA). Here's an interesting site, which shows the writing instruments used on Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo flights (as well as some Shuttle flights). There's also some history on who used what.


I used to have a "Space Pen. " They're pretty cool. Bought it when I was at the US Spaces Academy back around 1990/91. Sadly I lost it, but it was cool
 
2012-06-20 11:13:54 PM
Please tell me these machines don't take money.

/yeah boss I'll have those parts done as soon as I can afford those carbide end mills....
 
2012-06-21 12:15:33 AM
I have plenty of these. They've been around for a long time. It's a great way to keep inventory control folks from hindering production with excessive procedure.

Typically you enter your employee number and sometimes an authorization number. The vendor restocks it and tacks on a charge that's about equal to having it staffed on site. They'll charge you if you make them carry something that you don't use within six months or so.
 
2012-06-21 02:57:14 AM
The aviation side of the Navy/Marine Corps actually does something that's not this cool, but actually does something very similar. The replacement tools are locked away in a small room, ready to be issued with approval from Quality Assurance if the tool is broken/worn, or from the Maintenance Officer if the tool is missing.

The most important thing is making sure people don't steal the tools, the second most important thing is making sure they're not stuck inside an engine or something.
 
2012-06-21 03:10:33 AM
We had something similar at a place I used to work. It was controlled by a PC and you entered your ID number and what you needed. A little drawer would pop open and you could take the tool or bit or whatever. Problem was, the drawer had a plastic insert that you could pull out and take all of the bits out of that drawer. They got rid of it pretty quickly because of this, IIRC. Caused all kinds of headaches for both the line workers that didnt get the parts they need and the people trying to track inventory.
 
2012-06-21 08:32:20 AM
Doesn't get the crib part? He's never heard of a tool crib? Is he 12?
 
2012-06-21 10:13:18 AM

Maul555: I don't get it. Why do these machines exist? is it for security reasons? Why not have this stuff in bins for people to use?


The machines automatically order more stuff so you never run out. And it makes it really easy to ad the cost of tooling to the job. Security is a concern when you are dealing with a lot of small cutting tools that range in price from ten to several hundred dollars. And when you do it through a supply company you can keep tooling in the shop without paying for it till you need it, which is handy for odd tools you don't use often.
 
2012-06-21 10:42:33 AM

J. Frank Parnell: Maul555: I don't get it. Why do these machines exist? is it for security reasons? Why not have this stuff in bins for people to use?

I was going to make a parallel to the saying that NASA spent millions of dollars on a pen that would work in space, while the Russians just used a pencil, by saying instead of this the Russians would just use labeled drawers. But i don't think anyone would have gotten it without me explaining.

All that aside, it's probably easier for the company providing the tools to keep track electronically than it is to have some guy count how many are missing each day or week.


And that's an urban legend, anyway. The space pen was a purely private thing, NASA jumped at them when they saw them. Pencils in zero-g are a bad idea.

jclaggett: I used to have a "Space Pen. " They're pretty cool. Bought it when I was at the US Spaces Academy back around 1990/91. Sadly I lost it, but it was cool


Yeah, they make such a good pen, why can't they make some way to keep it from getting lost? <G>

abhorrent1: Doesn't get the crib part? He's never heard of a tool crib? Is he 12?


Many of us haven't worked in fields where we encountered them. This is the first time I ever heard of a tool *crib*. In my experience it was always the tool room. (The sort of stuff we dealt with was bigger, little of it would work in a vending machine.)
 
2012-06-21 03:27:07 PM
I sell similar equipment, but on a larger scale. The units can be up to 42' high and up to 22' wide on the trays themselves.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5oNHo_LPfg
 
2012-06-21 03:47:50 PM
From the comments:

"So then I walk up and I'm like 'G7 - 13mm carbide forstner bit' and I put my $419 using all ones and fives and half those bills got washed last week so they're all crumply, and the bastard gets stuck on the way out. So I stand there for like 15 minutes until Joe from liquid fuel research walks up and I'm like 'Hey Joe you don't happen to need that forstner in G7 do you?' and he's like 'As if!' and hits G8 just to fark with me. That's the Hydrogen Peroxide stabilizer solution that I know for a fact he already has at his desk, but whatev. Then I start shaking the machine and that big fat lady from security comes out of nowhere and tells me to chill. I told her what happened and she just said I needed to write a letter to CribMaster and wait for my refund. So I just gave up and went back to my desk. Then about 2 hours later I come by for a Mountain Dew Redzone and I look over and the thing is gone!! Somebody just scored that bit BOGO and now they're ALL gone. Should I send an 'all employees' email or just post an angry rant on my facebook page? I swear some of these people. They may be rocket scientists, but they act like a bunch of brain surgeons."
 
2012-06-23 12:35:12 AM
This week on MTV Tool Cribs: RFID'd tools and RFID'd employees means you just walk in and take what you want.
 
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