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(LA Times)   World War II vet, 92, wins PTSD disability benefits from stress caused by war, economy, Social Security, Medicare   (articles.latimes.com) divider line 19
    More: Followup, World War II, PTSD, social security, Persian Gulf War, chronic stress, Army Air Corps  
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511 clicks; posted to Politics » on 19 Jun 2012 at 9:12 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-19 09:17:41 AM  
Better late than never.

And the headline is 4 words too long.
 
2012-06-19 09:18:34 AM  
The VA deserves a big one finger salute!
 
2012-06-19 09:19:51 AM  
I didn't realize there were any WW2 vets still kicking around
 
2012-06-19 09:24:42 AM  
Lost Thought 00


I didn't realize there were any WW2 vets still kicking around


Was thinking the same thing so I googled it:

16,112,566 individuals were members of the United States armed forces during World War II. There were 291,557 battle deaths, 113,842 other deaths in service (non-theater), and 670,846 non-mortal woundings. In November 2011, the Department of Veterans Affairs estimated that approximately 1,711,000 American veterans were still living.[1]

.
 
2012-06-19 09:26:27 AM  
Approves:

content7.flixster.com
 
2012-06-19 09:27:39 AM  
Not PTSD. Battle Fatigue.
 
2012-06-19 09:28:37 AM  
Shell shock.

Bet the lawyers aren't finished taking their cut before he goes.
 
2012-06-19 09:28:59 AM  

Lost Thought 00: I didn't realize there were any WW2 vets still kicking around


What are you talking about? It ended in '45 so the youngest vets are still only 85. I have two ww2 vets as neighbors and I live in a regular residential neighborhood.

Are you thinking of WW1?
 
2012-06-19 09:30:46 AM  
Glad the VA got right on that one.

/read where back in WWII and Korean war, the number of disabilities claimed by solders averaged about two
//today's soldiers claim 7-8
///of course more are surviving their wounds
 
2012-06-19 09:37:11 AM  

Debeo Summa Credo: Lost Thought 00: I didn't realize there were any WW2 vets still kicking around

What are you talking about? It ended in '45 so the youngest vets are still only 85. I have two ww2 vets as neighbors and I live in a regular residential neighborhood.

Are you thinking of WW1?


Probably, but 85 isn't exactly young
 
2012-06-19 09:37:19 AM  
How would you like to be the guy whose job it is to accuse veterans of faking PTSD in order to add a few bucks to the federal coffer?
 
2012-06-19 09:43:32 AM  
Uncle Sam would probably rather give the guy a bottle of booze and tell him to go deal with it elsewhere.



/over the weekend I learned more about what my Grandpa's tasks were while he was serving in WWII...disturbing.
 
2012-06-19 09:49:20 AM  
Not for nothin', but I can see why it took so long. It's not a matter of accusing Vets of faking PTSD, the trick is getting the paperwork to verify the Vet's service and to back up the traumatic event(s). The current Vet generation has it a bit easier in proving the events, as they are still fresh, and the records are easily obtainable. The WWII guys not so much. With the extended amount of time, there are multiple possibilities of traumatic events that may not be service-related (i.e. this guy's service as a firefighter.) To further complicate things, there is the matter of the records. In 1973, there was a fire in St. Louis where a great many of the WWII/Korean War/some Vietnam War veterans records went up in smoke, making the verification of service that much more difficult, especially if the Vet is unable to provide proof of service (a DD-214). Still, I love hearing stuff like this.
 
2012-06-19 09:54:59 AM  

I'm an Egyptian!: Not for nothin', but I can see why it took so long. It's not a matter of accusing Vets of faking PTSD, the trick is getting the paperwork to verify the Vet's service and to back up the traumatic event(s). The current Vet generation has it a bit easier in proving the events, as they are still fresh, and the records are easily obtainable. The WWII guys not so much. With the extended amount of time, there are multiple possibilities of traumatic events that may not be service-related (i.e. this guy's service as a firefighter.) To further complicate things, there is the matter of the records. In 1973, there was a fire in St. Louis where a great many of the WWII/Korean War/some Vietnam War veterans records went up in smoke, making the verification of service that much more difficult, especially if the Vet is unable to provide proof of service (a DD-214). Still, I love hearing stuff like this.


I think I heard about that fire. After the fact, I was 2 years old in 1973. But I can see the Records Center from home, in the winter. Too many leafy trees now.
 
2012-06-19 09:55:49 AM  
70%? I got 80%! This guy should be getting 100% with 60 years of back pay if only for the trouble they put him through due to sloppy records.
 
2012-06-19 09:58:23 AM  

Alphax: I'm an Egyptian!: Not for nothin', but I can see why it took so long. It's not a matter of accusing Vets of faking PTSD, the trick is getting the paperwork to verify the Vet's service and to back up the traumatic event(s). The current Vet generation has it a bit easier in proving the events, as they are still fresh, and the records are easily obtainable. The WWII guys not so much. With the extended amount of time, there are multiple possibilities of traumatic events that may not be service-related (i.e. this guy's service as a firefighter.) To further complicate things, there is the matter of the records. In 1973, there was a fire in St. Louis where a great many of the WWII/Korean War/some Vietnam War veterans records went up in smoke, making the verification of service that much more difficult, especially if the Vet is unable to provide proof of service (a DD-214). Still, I love hearing stuff like this.

I think I heard about that fire. After the fact, I was 2 years old in 1973. But I can see the Records Center from home, in the winter. Too many leafy trees now.


That fire has made life difficult for a bunch of pre-'73 veterans in terms of verifying service. If they don't have a copy of their discharge paperwork, in many cases, they have to resort to the kind of detective work described in the article to verify service. Frankly, it sucks. Hopefully, this won't happen to a lot of the newer Vets. Most of the medical paperwork and discharge paperwork is stored on servers. Granted if the servers go out, that's a problem.
 
2012-06-19 10:07:13 AM  

imontheinternet: How would you like to be the guy whose job it is to accuse veterans of faking PTSD in order to add a few bucks to the federal coffer?


Considering my friend had to sit through a group therapy session a few years back with one person that had PTSD because their Drill SGT yelled at them too much and another one because a mortar round landed within 500 meters of them on an Airfield, I would not mind that job too much at all. (my friend was 33 years old waling with a cane and learning how to write with his left hand thanks to his vehicle being blown up)

Plus their is a small fraction of veterans today that believe PTSD disability checks is free money and they they are entitled to it because everyone else is getting it. Even though them taking that money takes away from an already underfunded system

I really won't mind being that person at all.

An Honorable Discharge does not make them an Honorable person.

/ Veteran
// Currently Finishing my Masters of Social Work and will work for the VA
 
2012-06-19 10:23:14 AM  
3.bp.blogspot.com

A bit long but worth it.

Audie Murphy was reportedly plagued by insomnia, bouts of depression, and nightmares related to his numerous battles throughout his life. When Murphy did sleep it was with a loaded pistol under his pillow. For a time during the mid-1960s, he became dependent on doctor-prescribed sleeping pills called Placidyl. When he recognized that he had become addicted to the drug, he locked himself in a motel room where he took himself off the pills, going through withdrawal for a week.
Always an advocate of the needs of America's military veterans, Murphy eventually broke the taboo about publicly discussing war-related mental conditions. In an effort to draw attention to the problems of returning Korean and Vietnam War veterans, Murphy spoke out candidly about his own problems with PTSD, known then and during World War II as "battle fatigue". He called on the United States government to give increased consideration and study to the emotional impact that combat experiences have on veterans, and to extend health care benefits to address PTSD and other mental-health problems suffered by returning war veterans.
 
2012-06-19 12:57:55 PM  
joeyjoejoeshabado


imontheinternet: How would you like to be the guy whose job it is to accuse veterans of faking PTSD in order to add a few bucks to the federal coffer?

Considering my friend had to sit through a group therapy session a few years back with one person that had PTSD because their Drill SGT yelled at them too much and another one because a mortar round landed within 500 meters of them on an Airfield, I would not mind that job too much at all. (my friend was 33 years old waling with a cane and learning how to write with his left hand thanks to his vehicle being blown up)

Plus their is a small fraction of veterans today that believe PTSD disability checks is free money and they they are entitled to it because everyone else is getting it. Even though them taking that money takes away from an already underfunded system

I really won't mind being that person at all.

An Honorable Discharge does not make them an Honorable person.

/ Veteran
// Currently Finishing my Masters of Social Work and will work for the VA



Good for you - this country needs more government social workers.
 
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